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Found 20 results

  1. Police officers are trained to hide evidence that would undermine their investigations in court, a damning dossier reveals. Full Story - Daily Mail
  2. A rather bizarre case, his intentions seemed to be good but ultimately led to the death of a completely innocent man.
  3. Has anyone experienced being called to court for a job that they were involved with as special (or regular) but you no longer hold the Office of Constable? If so, how does it differ? Are you just treated as a civilian witness or are you still identified as a police officer - such as when saying rank/collar number/station at the start of giving evidence would you say this as it was at the time of the incident? I ask because, although I am still a Special Constable at the minute, I will start as a regular in April and I have been warned to attend court four days later!! So I will have resigned as a special but not yet been sworn in as a regular (that comes during the second week of training I have been told) That leads me onto my second question... despite having all of the uniform etc. would I just wear shirt/tie to court or could I still wear the uniform? I'm so confused what I'm going to do I imagine that it happens a fair few times, either with retired regulars or specials that have resigned but I think my situation will be quite unique/unlucky!
  4. A notorious gang of YouTube pranksters are behind bars today for staging a ‘terrifying’ fake art heist in the National Portrait Gallery. One woman passed out as dozens of terrified art lovers fled from the the Wolfson Gallery during the stunt. Daniel Jarvis, 27, Ebenezer Mensah, 29, and Helder Gomes, 23, pulled full-length tights over their heads and shouted ‘let’s get the paintings’ last July 5. The trio had smuggled ‘ridiculous’ paintings into the BP Portrait Award Exhibition in bin bags and then pretended they were robbing high-value artworks as they ran amok during the ‘immature’ stunt. Endrit Ferizolli, 20, took a speaker system into the Wolfson Gallery which let off alarm sounds as Dahn Van Le, 31, filmed patrons panicking for his YouTube channel Trollstation. The gallery pranks – which it is understood he filmed – saw fake raiders with tights over their faces run into the galleries with paintings in a mock heist. Later that day the pranksters, who have 718,000 subscribers, staged another fake robbery after Van Le carried fake paintings into the Tate Britain gallery, in Millbank, central London, with an unknown female who was thought to be in on the ‘warped’ joke. Gomes ran into the gallery and dragged the woman out in a headlock as Jarvis and Mensah grabbed the paintings for another viral video. The men were arrested later that day after the incidents – which a judge noted came just nine days after 39 people were massacred by an IS terrorist with an AK47 on a beach in Sousse, Tunisia. Today Jarvis, Mensah, Ferizolli, and Gomes admitted two counts of using threatening or abusive words and behaviour causing fear of unlawful violence at City of London Magistrates’ Court. Sentencing the men, District Judge Mike Snow said: ‘The defendants in this case are part of a group called TrollStation, a group that believes it is amusing to film acts impacting on the public and then upload those onto the internet, specifically YouTube. ‘On Sunday 5 July the group planned two acts to take place in the National Portrait Gallery and the Tate Britain Gallery. ‘Those acts involved attending with a speaker which could be activated to sound an alarm, the use of tights as masks, and the carrying of paintings as a pose for a robbery.’ He continued: ‘Their sense of humour is warped and immature. ‘It was quite foreseeable that those attending the gallery not being in on the joke and being familiar with the recent scenes of people running for their lives from terrorist acts would be terrified.’ Judge Snow said the men had caused ‘high levels of fear of violence’, a ‘risk of death or injury’ during the stampede from the National Portrait Gallery, and sought to ‘humiliate’ the victims ‘by ‘recording their terrified reactions to upload onto the internet’. Jarvis, of Turner House, Whitehill Road, Gravesend, Kent, was jailed for 20 weeks, while Ferizolli, of Wakemans Hill Avenue, Colindale, northwest London, was jailed for 16 weeks. Gomes, of Pinter House, Grantham Road, Stockwell, southwest London, and Mensah, of Sumner Road, Peckham, southeast London, were each jailed for 18 weeks. Metro.co.ukhttp://metro.co.uk/2016/05/16/four-members-of-trollstation-jailed-for-national-portrait-gallery-prank-5885469/#ixzz48uPOQwft
  5. maccalen999

    Police & Court Imposed Condition

    Hi, I'm a new PC and am looking for a little clarification. I'm wondering what the difference is between court imposed and Police imposed bail conditions and how & why we treat them differently. I understand that Police imposed are issued whilst on bail, awaiting further enquiries etc, and understand the sort of things they may be...however, I've heard other officers say things like 'they're Police imposed, we won't arrest for them' and similar...so, what's your views and reasoning behind this?
  6. https://www.westmercia.police.uk/article/13498/Image-released-of-man-wanted-after-failing-to-appear-at-court
  7. A Serco custody officer has died after being viciously attacked by a prisoner outside Blackfriars crown court in London. Lorraine Barwell, 54, was seriously assaulted as she escorted a male prisoner from the court to a van at around 1.35pm on Monday 29 June. The attack was so severe that London air ambulance was called to treat Barwell at the scene. She was flown to an east London hospital in a critical condition. Scotland Yard announced on Friday that Barwell had died of her injuries. Humphrey Burke, 22, has been charged with her assault. He appeared at Camberwell Green magistrates court on Wednesday accused of grievous bodily harm. Burke, of no fixed abode, is due to appear at the Old Bailey on 15 June. Fellow prison officers paid tribute to Barwell on staff forums. A Facebook campaign launched by a serving prison officer to highlight the daily risks faced by jail staff changed its picture to a half-mast union flag, with the words: “Lorraine Barwell 1960-2015.” A statement posted on the Know the Danger page said: “The response from shocked and saddened people to this murder is overwhelming and reminds us that our petty differences are inconsequential in comparison to the horror of this incident! “Private or public we are united in our anger that this ladies (sic) premature death has been allowed to happen and we must unite to ensure all of us are safe and protected when carrying out our difficult roles.” A Serco custody officer has died after being viciously attacked by a prisoner outside Blackfriars crown court in London. Lorraine Barwell, 54, was seriously assaulted as she escorted a male prisoner from the court to a van at around 1.35pm on Monday 29 June. The attack was so severe that London air ambulance was called to treat Barwell at the scene. She was flown to an east London hospital in a critical condition. Scotland Yard announced on Friday that Barwell had died of her injuries. Humphrey Burke, 22, has been charged with her assault. He appeared at Camberwell Green magistrates court on Wednesday accused of grievous bodily harm. Burke, of no fixed abode, is due to appear at the Old Bailey on 15 June. Fellow prison officers paid tribute to Barwell on staff forums. A Facebook campaign launched by a serving prison officer to highlight the daily risks faced by jail staff changed its picture to a half-mast union flag, with the words: “Lorraine Barwell 1960-2015.” A statement posted on the Know the Danger page said: “The response from shocked and saddened people to this murder is overwhelming and reminds us that our petty differences are inconsequential in comparison to the horror of this incident! “Private or public we are united in our anger that this ladies (sic) premature death has been allowed to happen and we must unite to ensure all of us are safe and protected when carrying out our difficult roles.” http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jul/03/female-security-guard-lorraine-barwell-dies-assault
  8. One for the legal beagles amongst us... A question I've wondered for a while is whether a court which felt someone had been inappropriately charged or their conduct fell short of the offence they had been charged with but met another, can convict them of that alternative offence for which they haven't been charged or not? A bit of research tells me that a jury can by virtue of S6(3) Criminal Law Act 1967, but how about a magistrates' court trying purely summary offences - can they decide that the defendant isn't guilty of using violence to secure entry but is guilty of being found on enclosed premises, or that his conduct falls short of causing harassment, alarm or distress but that he was certainly drunk and disorderly? If it is permitted, has anyone ever heard of it happening?
  9. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-32757633 Manu Tuilagi admits assaulting police officer · 22 minutes ago · From the sectionLeicester Manu Tuilagi has played for England since 2011 England rugby player Manu Tuilagi will not play in this year's World Cup after admitting assaulting a police officer, head coach Stuart Lancaster has said. Tuilagi, 23, who plays for Leicester Tigers, was fined £6,205 when he appeared before magistrates. He had been charged with two counts of assaulting a police officer, assault by beating and causing criminal damage, the Crown Prosecution Service said. Lancaster said he would not be considered for England until 2016. The court heard Tuilagi assaulted the officer in the early hours of 26 April. He had missed most of the season after suffering a groin injury but had hoped to return to the national side. 'Role model' "As role models and ambassadors for the game, the highest standards of behaviour are expected from every England player both on and off the field," Lancaster said. "Having spoken to Manu, he understands and accepts both the seriousness of the offences to which he has pleaded guilty and the consequences of his behaviour to his club, country and the game as a whole." Tuilagi's misdemeanours § Tuilagi was warned by police and fined £3,000 by England rugby officials for jumping from a ferry in Auckland in 2011 during the World Cup § He was fined £4,800 by the International Rugby Board for wearing an unapproved mouthguard carrying the name of a sponsor § The Leicester centre was also banned for five weeks in May 2011 for punching Northampton's Chris Ashton Tuilagi said: "I take full responsibility for my actions and unreservedly apologise to all those involved in the incident, Leicester Tigers and England. "It is something I deeply regret and I totally accept the sentence given by the court. The club and Stuart have been very supportive and I understand their sanctions too. "I know, as an England player, the need to conduct myself as a good role model for the game. I am very disappointed because my actions have let so many people down and I can only hope for a future chance to prove myself again." Two things from me.. 1) I really hope I never get assaulted by an international-standard rugby player, ouch! 2) Good to see decisive action from the English rugby team, that's a bit more than a one or two match ban that a football player would get, missing the World Cup can ruin someone's career.
  10. HampshireSaint

    Court Dress

    Have to attend a court case in July. This will be my first attendance and I am the only officer called. What's the process when you get there and what is the dress code? Do I need tunic?
  11. source I'm all for diversity and freedom to observe religious customs, but in court the jury need to be able to see the facial expressions of someone to decide the truth of what they are saying. There is also the question of identity.
  12. Sir Penguin

    Filming in a court

    Nothing massively interesting here, just thought that I'd share it having come across it on youtube. Would any officers have considered a different approach?
  13. Is it time we looked at this antiquated and most often utterly worthless piece of legislation??   There seems to be some sort of delusion by the courts that breach of bail is seen as something that matters in the slightest for anything short of murder.    We arrest, build a huge file and put the person before the courts and nothing changes. Then we do it again. We are doing it half a dozen times for the same person for the same case and nothing changes. How can the court think that its making any difference.    How about we do one of 2 things: 1, Make it an actual offence?  2, Instead of arresting, send a report to the courts about what happened and if they want the person actually brought in, we do it. Rather than waste staggering amounts of time and money for a worthless paperwork exercise.    Just thinking 
  14. Something that cropped up recently which I've not managed to find a suitable answer for. Some of the family law act and housing act injunctions have conditional powers of arrest attached to them. My thoughts with these was that they are taken by us in front of the next available local demand court who then process them to the issuing county court however some people have suggested we take them straight to the county court or 'charge' and bail them to a mags court. Has anyone dealt with one of these and had some sort of definitive answer?
  15. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30992608   Victims in England and Wales are still being let down by the justice system, according to an independent review. Baroness Newlove, the Victims' Commissioner, said many people who raised concerns about their treatment were left feeling ignored. Helen Newlove came to prominence after her husband was killed by a gang of youths outside their home in 2007. This is her first major review since being appointed as a commissioner in 2012. The report looked at the experiences of more than 200 victims who had complained about how they were dealt with by services including the police, probation and the courts system. 'Dismissed and confused' Almost 75% of those consulted said they were unhappy with the response they received and more than 50% found the relevant agency's complaints process difficult to use. She told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that victims need time, understanding and compassion. "Victims will only be at the heart of the criminal justice system if you allow them to understand the journey they are going through," she said. Baroness Newlove said it was clear many victims were still not getting the service they deserved and there was a gap between what criminal justice agencies described and the victim's experience. "All it takes is basic human decency to explain to a victim, in a sensitive and timely way, why something has gone wrong and what they can do about it." she said. "It is shocking how many victims told me how ignored, dismissed and confused they felt when they tried to raise concerns about their treatment." One victim said the complaints process was so daunting that it "was almost worse than the actual journey of being a victim". Another told the review: "I'm just frightened. I think they will harass me if I complain about the way they have treated me and my daughter." The commissioner has laid out a new set of standards which she expects the government and agencies to adopt when responding to concerns from victims. Victims' Commissioner's Standards Clear information for victims to support them in raising a concern or making a complaint about the service they have received Information on what to do if they are not happy with the response they receive Agencies commit to mandatory training for all staff who deal with victims' complaints Agencies publish information showing how complaints from victims have led to improvements in services. Victims' rights campaigner Maggie Hughes, whose son Robert was left in a coma after being attacked, said: "We victims are not just complainers. "If anything, we are thrown into a new world of rules and regulations and then into a dark labyrinth of the unknown. "This important report shows just how crucial it is to listen to victims. If we feel that we are not satisfied with a service, then we should be able to get clear guidelines on how to complain, regular updates and a full explanation of the outcome." Victims' minister Mike Penning said the government had already committed to giving victims legal rights, and strengthening victims' entitlements through the Victims' Code, and was reviewing whether new powers are needed "so that they can better hold the system to account." He said: "I welcome Baroness Newlove's dedication and hard work supporting my goal to make the system better for victims. "She recommends many sensible new standards in this important report, which I will carefully consider."     We get loads of input about the victim code and what should happen and by and large it does, we update them frequently that we haven't been able to progress the matter due to staff shortages (without using those bad words of course). We do our best with our limited resources, arbitrary time limits and massive bureaucratic processes that slow things down and then inform them we have looked into the matter in the appropriate way and the case is going to be closed.  Or worse, its not going to be closed and they have a 6-12 month wait for a court date, during which there is almost nothing we can do to prevent them being intimidated, other than a pointless arrest for breach of bail. The trial will possibly then go ahead, assuming its not been double or triple booked, the suspect actually arrives along with all the witness, some of whom wont have been called at all.  Assuming it does go ahead it will be prosecuted by a cps lawyer who has just seen the file and going against a defence solicitor who has had months to pick the file apart.  If all that works out and a guilty verdict is reached, the sentence will be 10% of what you expected, with fines that dont need to be paid, community services that doesnt need to be done. Or 50% off any sentence just because why not. 
  16. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-30945505   A senior judge has set out plans to "streamline" the "inefficient, time consuming and... very expensive" justice system in England and Wales. Among Lord Justice Leveson's ideas are more use of evidence from cameras worn by police, and flexible court hours. The BBC's Clive Coleman says parts of the report could "dramatically change the criminal justice system", affecting the right to opt for trial by jury. The government said it wanted to work with judges to improve the system. It has already announced a £160m scheme to replace courts' "outdated paper-based system" with "digital courtrooms". Lord Justice Leveson, the third most senior judge in England and Wales, said the criminal justice system must expect "diminished resources for years to come" and needs to be efficient. His report, commissioned by the Lord Chief Justice, also calls for government money to fund the changes. His recommendations, which he said would not require legislation, include: more use of technology to allow "remote hearings" "tighter case management" by judges, including, in appropriate cases, the provision of timetables for evidence and speeches more "high-quality equipment" in courts to ensure footage from police body-worn cameras can be shown "flexible opening hours" in magistrates' courts to accommodate those who cannot attend during normal working hours contracts requiring "greater efficiency" from those who deliver prisoners to courts, to avoid delays Analysis By Clive Coleman, BBC legal affairs correspondent Lord Justice Leveson has made recommendations largely about technology and procedures, that don't require legislation. However, in Part 10 of his report he covers potentially radical changes - many of which have been discussed for years - that could dramatically change the criminal justice system. Such changes would be for parliament to decide, but Leveson is nudging it to look at these. One is the defendant's right to choose jury trial for offences that can be tried either in the magistrates or crown court. Many who Lord Justice Leveson consulted wanted the court rather than the defendant to have the power to decide whether trial was to be in the magistrates court or in crown court - where trials are far longer and more expensive. The right to jury trial began in the 19th Century, at a time when defendants had much less legal protection. Is it still right that a defendant can decide to have a jury trial for stealing a newspaper from a shop? Or should that now be decided by an independent judge? The judge, who previously led the inquiry into the culture, practice and ethics of the press, said the government should make money available to meet the "inevitable cost of changing from the current systems to the more efficient ones". "The changes I have recommended are all designed to streamline the way the investigation and prosecution of crime is approached without ever losing sight of the interests of justice," he said. "Our conduct of criminal trials was designed in the 19th Century with many changes and reforms bolted on, especially over the last 30 years. "The result is that it has become inefficient, time consuming and, as a result, very expensive."     I will fall of my chair if any of this actually happens. The 'reforms' they are talking about are just things that should be in place anyway.  I shall enjoy court being a demented farce for years to come. 
  17. Hi all, I've got to go to court next week in relation to someone I reported for driving without insurance. He's pleaded guilty but is claiming special reasons why he shouldn't be given the relevant penalty points (he's subject to New Drivers Act 1995) - I've been called as a prosecution witness, does anyone know what sort of stuff I'll be asked? Thanks very much, F&V

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