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  1. Today
  2. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: China reports no Covid-29 deaths for first time 7 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The country's Health Commission confirmed there had been no deaths and 32 confirmed cases China reported no coronavirus deaths on Tuesday, the first time since it started publishing daily figures in January. The National Health Commission said it had 32 confirmed cases, down from 39 on Monday. It comes as the government is under scrutiny as to whether it is underreporting its figures. The government says more than 3,331 people have died and 81,740 have been confirmed as infected. All of the confirmed cases on Tuesday had arrived from overseas. LIVE: China reports no new virus deaths for first time A visual guide to the world in lockdown China is concerned a second wave of infections could be brought in by foreign arrivals. It has already shut its border to foreigners including those with visas or residence permits. International flights have been reduced with both Chinese and foreign airlines only allowed to operate one international flight a week. Flights must not be more than 75% full. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionA day of remembrance is held in China to honour those who have died in the coronavirus outbreak On Wednesday, Wuhan is set to allow people to leave the city for the first time since the lockdown began in January. Officials say anyone who has a "green" code on a widely used smartphone health app will be allowed to leave the city. Some people in "epidemic-free" residential compounds have already been allowed to leave their homes for two hours. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak VIDEO: The 20-second hand wash STRESS: How to look after your mental health But Wuhan officials revoked the "epidemic-free" status in 45 compounds because of the emergence of asymptomatic cases and for other unspecified reasons. Asymptomatic refers to someone who is carrying the virus but experiencing no symptoms. China began reporting asymptomatic cases at the beginning of April. More than 1,033 asymptomatic patients are under medical observation. Hitting back at claims China was too slow to raise the alarm, the country's state media have published what they describe as a detailed timeline of its response and information sharing. The first day with zero new reported coronavirus deaths since the National Health Commission started publishing daily figures is no doubt a cause for hope in China and even across the world. In a way it doesn't matter if the figure is real. There has been much debate about the veracity of this country's coronavirus statistics but, even if the overall number of infections and deaths is under-reported, the trend seems instructive. Why? Because the trend matches reality in so many ways. Interestingly, China's Communist Party-controlled media is not reporting the first 24 hours without fatalities with any great fanfare. The subject isn't even a key trending subject on Chinese social media platforms. It was the same when we had the first day with no new home-grown infections. This either means Chinese media outlets know too well that there are flaws in the accounting here or, more likely, that the Party knows there are flaws in its accounting so it's ordered a cautious presentation. Either way, in the end, it's probably neither here nor there. Look at the trend. In the trend there is good news. What's happening elsewhere? UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has spent the night in intensive care. He has been suffering from coronavirus symptoms for 10 days Late on Monday, the US recorded 1,150 new coronavirus deaths in 24 hours. It now has the world's highest number of confirmed cases with more than 366,000 More than 1.3 million cases have now been confirmed worldwide with nearly 75,000 deaths Japan is preparing for a state of emergency to go into effect. The measure, announced on Tuesday, could go into effect as early as Wednesday France has recorded its highest daily death toll of 833 View the full article
  3. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Boris Johnson moved to intensive care as symptoms worsen 7 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright Getty Images Prime Minister Boris Johnson is spending the night in an intensive care unit after his coronavirus symptoms worsened. Downing Street said he was moved to the unit on the advice of his medical team and was receiving "excellent care". Mr Johnson has asked Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab to deputise "where necessary", a spokesman added. The prime minister, 55, was admitted to hospital in London with "persistent symptoms" on Sunday evening. The Queen has been kept informed about Mr Johnson's health by No 10, according to Buckingham Palace. World leaders - including US President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron - have expressed their support for Mr Johnson. BBC political correspondent Chris Mason said the prime minister was given oxygen late on Monday afternoon, before being taken to intensive care. The move means the prime minister is closer to a ventilator - which takes over the body's breathing process - should he need one. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health A No 10 statement read: "The prime minister has been under the care of doctors at St Thomas' Hospital, in London, after being admitted with persistent symptoms of coronavirus. "Over the course of [Monday] afternoon, the condition of the prime minister has worsened and, on the advice of his medical team, he has been moved to the intensive care unit at the hospital." It continued: "The PM is receiving excellent care, and thanks all NHS staff for their hard work and dedication." Laura Kuenssberg: Power is no protection from harm PM's intensive care move dominates front pages Who's in charge if a PM is incapacitated? How are coronavirus patients treated in intensive care? Mr Raab - who will later chair the government's daily Covid-19 meeting - said there was an "incredibly strong team spirit" behind the prime minister. He added that he and his colleagues were making sure they implemented plans Mr Johnson had instructed them to deliver "as soon as possible". "That's the way we'll bring the whole country through the coronavirus challenge," he said. Image copyright PA Media Image caption Mr Johnson is being treated at London's St Thomas' Hospital - just minutes from Downing Street Mr Johnson was initially taken to hospital for routine tests after testing positive for coronavirus 10 days ago. His symptoms included a high temperature and a cough. Earlier on Monday, he tweeted that he was in "good spirits". Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer described it as "terribly sad news". "All the country's thoughts are with the prime minister and his family during this incredibly difficult time," he added. Meanwhile, Mr Trump said Americans "are all praying for his recovery". He described Mr Johnson as "a very good friend of mine and a friend to our nation" who is "strong" and "doesn't give up". Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionTrump asks drug companies to assist PM's recovery Mr Macron said he sent "all my support to Boris Johnson, to his family and to the British people at this difficult moment". After very, very little information was shared today, the prime minister was taken into intensive care at around 19:00 BST. We've been told he is still conscious, but his condition has worsened over the course of the afternoon. And he has been moved to intensive care as a precaution in case he needs ventilation to get through this illness. The statement from Downing Street makes clear he is receiving excellent care and he wants to thank all of the NHS staff. But something important has changed, and he has felt it necessary to ask his foreign secretary to deputise for him where needs be. That is a completely different message from what we have heard over the past 18 hours or so, where it was continually "the prime minister is in touch" and "he is in charge" - almost like everything is business as usual. But clearly being in intensive care changes everything. Read more from Laura Last month, the prime minister's spokesman said if Mr Johnson was unwell and unable to work, Mr Raab, as the first secretary of state, would stand in. It comes as the number of coronavirus hospital deaths in the UK reached 5,373 - an increase of 439 in a day. The Department of Health and Social Care said there were now 51,608 confirmed coronavirus cases. Intensive care is where doctors look after the sickest patients - his admission to ICU is the clearest indication of how ill the prime minister is. We do not know the full details of Mr Johnson's condition, but he is conscious and not being ventilated. Not every patient in intensive care is ventilated, but around two-thirds are within 24 hours of admission with Covid-19. This is a disease that attacks the lungs and can cause pneumonia and difficulty breathing. This leaves the body struggling to get enough oxygen into the blood and to the body's vital organs. There is no proven drug treatment for Covid-19, although there are many experimental candidates. But the cornerstone of the prime minister's care will depend on getting enough oxygen into his body and supporting his other organs while his immune system fights the virus. Chancellor Rishi Sunak said his thoughts were with the prime minister and his pregnant partner, Carrie Symonds, and that Mr Johnson would "come out of this even stronger". On Saturday, Ms Symonds said she had spent a week in bed with the main symptoms. She said she had not been tested for the virus. Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said she was "sending [Mr Johnson] every good wish", while Northern Ireland's First Minister Arlene Foster added she was "praying for a full and speedy recovery". Wales' First Minister Mark Drakeford called it "concerning news". Mr Johnson's predecessor, Theresa May, and former Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn both said their thoughts were with him. Mrs May noted that the "horrific virus does not discriminate". When do people go to hospital with coronavirus? Inside an intensive care unit fighting Covid-19 'Too early' to consider virus lockdown exit strategy The Taoiseach - Irish Prime Minister - Leo Varadkar wished Mr Johnson "a rapid return to health", and French President Emmanuel Macron said he hoped he "overcomes this ordeal quickly." European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen also wished him a "speedy and full recovery". For Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, the news "deepens our compassion for all who are seriously ill" and those looking after them. And Mayor of London Sadiq Khan tweeted that St Thomas' Hospital had "some of the finest medical staff in the world" and that the prime minister "couldn't be in safer hands". Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionDominic Raab: Boris Johnson "still remains in charge of the government" During the government's daily coronavirus briefing earlier on Monday, Mr Raab stressed that the prime minister had been continuing to run the government from hospital. Asked whether that was appropriate, Mr Raab said Mr Johnson would "take the medical advice that he gets from his doctor". "We have a team... that is full throttle making sure that his directions and his instructions are being implemented," he said. The foreign secretary added that he had not spoken to the prime minister since Saturday. Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who also tested positive for the virus and spent time in self-isolation, offered "all possible best wishes to Boris Johnson and his loved ones". "I know he will receive the best possible care from our amazing NHS," he tweeted. In other developments: A volunteer army of 750,000 people who signed up to support the NHS receives its first tasks Experts warn against over-interpreting daily figures of people dying with coronavirus amid reporting delays A team of scientists question the impact closing schools has on limiting the spread of coronavirus Thousands of people are missed off the government's high risk list for Covid-19 despite meeting the criteria France reports 833 new coronavirus deaths in the past day, the highest daily toll since its outbreak began New Zealand's health minister has called himself an "idiot" after breaking the country's lockdown by driving his family to the beach View the full article
  4. George Pell: Court quashes cardinal's sexual abuse convictions 7 April 2020 Related TopicsCardinal Pell sex abuse case Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Cardinal George Pell has had his child sexual abuse convictions overturned Cardinal George Pell will be freed from jail after Australia's highest court overturned his convictions for child sexual abuse. The ex-Vatican treasurer, 78, had been the most senior Catholic figure ever jailed for such crimes. In 2018, a jury found he abused two boys in Melbourne in the 1990s. But the High Court of Australia quashed that verdict on Tuesday, meaning the cardinal will immediately stop serving a six-year jail sentence. The Australian cleric has maintained his innocence since he was charged by police in June 2017. A full bench of seven judges ruled unanimously in Cardinal Pell's favour, finding that the jury had not properly considered all the evidence presented at trial. "The High Court found that the jury, acting rationally on the whole of the evidence, ought to have entertained a doubt as to the applicant's guilt," said the court in its judgement. It was the cardinal's final legal challenge, after his conviction was upheld by a lower court last year. Who is George Pell? Pell was among the highest-ranking figures in the Church's global hierarchy. Made a cardinal in 2003, he was summoned to Rome in 2014 to help clean up the Vatican's finances. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Pope John Paul II appointed Pell a cardinal in 2003 He forged a reputation as a disciplined Church leader who held strict conservative views against same-sex marriage, abortion and contraception. This is a breaking news story - more to follow. View the full article
  5. Yesterday
  6. Unfortunately I can think of plenty like him or would take exception to just being looked at. It sounds a very serious incident, especially dragging an officer into the road in front of an oncoming bus, whether it is treated as such later on in due course, remains to be seen.
  7. @bgrumney * Do you intend to publish your study? I would be very interested in reading it, if at all possible, please.😷
  8. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Boris Johnson taken to intensive care 6 April 2020 Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been taken into intensive care in hospital with coronavirus. He has asked Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab to deputise for him, a No 10 spokesman said. This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. You can receive Breaking News on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts. View the full article
  9. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Africa will not be testing ground for vaccine, says WHO 6 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright Reuters Image caption A health worker carries out a door-to-door testing near Durban in South Africa The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has condemned as "racist" the comments by two French doctors who suggested a vaccine for the coronavirus could be tested in Africa. "Africa can't and won't be a testing ground for any vaccine," said Director General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. The doctors' remarks during a TV debate sparked outrage, and they were accused of treating Africans like "human guinea pigs". One of them later issued an apology. When asked about the doctors' suggestion during the WHO's coronavirus briefing, Dr Tedros became visibly angry, calling it a hangover from the "colonial mentality". "It was a disgrace, appalling, to hear during the 21st Century, to hear from scientists, that kind of remark. We condemn this in the strongest terms possible, and we assure you that this will not happen," he said. Reality Check: Misinformation in Africa South Africa's ruthlessly efficient fight against coronavirus As the number of confirmed cases in Africa continues to rise, some governments are imposing stricter measures to try to slow the spread of the virus. Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta has banned all travel in and out of the capital, Nairobi, and three other large towns for three weeks. What did the doctors say? During a debate on French TV channel LCI, Camille Locht, head of research at Inserm health research group, was talking about a vaccine trial in Europe and Australia. Jean-Paul Mira, head of intensive care at Cochin hospital in Paris, then said: "If I can be provocative, shouldn't we be doing this study in Africa, where there are no masks, no treatments, no resuscitation? "A bit like it is done elsewhere for some studies on Aids. In prostitutes, we try things because we know that they are highly exposed and that they do not protect themselves." Mr Locht nodded in agreement at this suggestion, and said: "You are right. We are in the process of thinking about a study in parallel in Africa." Dr Mira had earlier questioned whether the study would work as planned on healthcare workers in Australia and Europe because they had access to personal protective equipment (PPE) while working. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionCoronavirus in Africa: Debunking fake news and myths around Covid-19 The show sparked widespread anger, including from former footballer Didier Drogba, who called the comments "deeply racist". He added: "Do not take African people as human guinea pigs! It’s absolutely disgusting". Fellow former footballer Samuel Eto’o called the doctors "murderers". The doctors' comments have also fuelled existing fears in Africa that African people will be used as guinea pigs for a new coronavirus vaccine. Coronavirus centres have been targeted in African countries - most recently, a facility that was under construction in Abidjan in Ivory Coast was attacked and destroyed by protesters. Footage posted on social media showed people tearing the centre apart with their bare hands, and smashing construction materials on the ground. A SIMPLE GUIDE: What are the symptoms? LIVE TRACKER: Coronavirus in Africa VACCINE: Are we getting closer to a coronavirus vaccine or drug? REASON TO HOPE: The good that may come out of this crisis What else is happening in Africa? Meanwhile, prominent Nigerian actress Funke Akindele was fined $260 (£210) after holding a birthday party for her husband at her mansion in Lagos, attended by a number of other Nigerian celebrities. Akindele and her husband pleaded guilty to violating Nigeria’s lockdown restrictions in a Lagos court, according to a statement from Lagos State police. The couple have also been ordered to do 14 days of community service. In South Africa, a pair of newlyweds were arrested after breaking lockdown restrictions to go ahead with their wedding. Police turned up to the party in KwaZulu-Natal after receiving a tip-off, and arrested all 50 wedding guests, the pastor who conducted the ceremony, and the couple themselves. Zimbabwe has warned people against buying and selling unregistered Covid-19 self-test kits. Unverified kits have been sold by private companies, including some pharmacies, but Health Minister Obadiah Moyo told the state-owned Herald newspaper that all kits need to be evaluated by the local authority first. View the full article
  10. A violent thug assaulted three police officers and threatened to "knock them out" when they asked if his travel during the coronaviruslockdown was essential. https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/thug-knocked-out-policeman-after-21823420.amp
  11. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Too early to consider lockdown exit strategy, says Raab 6 April 2020 Image copyright EPA It is too early to consider a strategy for exiting the coronavirus lockdown, the foreign secretary has said. Dominic Raab said the current measures were "beginning to work" - but shifting focus could mean "we won't get through the peak as fast as we need to". He added the prime minister remains in charge of the government from hospital, where he spent the night receiving treatment for coronavirus symptoms. The number of virus hospital deaths in the UK now stands at 5,373. The Department of Health and Social Care reported 51,608 confirmed cases. Earlier, Boris Johnson said he was in "good spirits" after spending the night in St Thomas' Hospital in London. The prime minister, 55, tested positive for coronavirus 10 days ago. He was taken to hospital on Sunday evening with "persistent symptoms" - including a temperature and a cough - for routine tests. Asked whether it was appropriate for the prime minister to run the government from hospital, Mr Raab said Mr Johnson would "take the medical advice that he gets from his doctor". "We have a team...that is full throttle making sure that his directions and his instructions are being implemented," he said. Last month, the prime minister's spokesman said if Mr Johnson was unwell and unable to work, Mr Raab, as the first secretary of state, would stand in. When do people go to hospital with coronavirus? Profile: Dominic Raab Skip Twitter post by @BorisJohnson Report End of Twitter post by @BorisJohnson Earlier, Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said he hoped the prime minister would be back in Downing Street "as soon as possible". "He's been working extremely hard leading the government and being constantly updated. That's going to continue," he told BBC Breakfast. "I'm sure this is very frustrating for him, for somebody like Boris who wants to be hands [on] running the government from the front, but nonetheless he's still very much in charge of the government," he added. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionJenrick: PM 'still very much in charge' A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health US President Donald Trump is among those who has sent his wishes to Mr Johnson. "All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader," Mr Trump said, adding that he was sure the prime minister would be fine because he is "a strong person". And Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said he hoped the prime minister had a "speedy recovery". Health minister Nadine Dorries, who herself tested positive for coronavirus last month, said many of those with the virus would be "felled" by fatigue and a high temperature and use isolation to sleep and recover. "Boris has risked his health and worked every day on our behalf to lead the battle against this vile virus," she said in a tweet. Meanwhile, the former head of the civil service Lord Kerslake said it may be "sensible" for Mr Johnson to "step back" if he is not well enough to carry out his role for now. "I think in the end if he's not well, he will have to reflect on this because the job's tough at the best of times and it's doubly tough now," he told the BBC Radio 4's Today programme. Dr Sarah Jarvis, a GP and broadcaster, told the BBC that Mr Johnson would be likely to have his chest X-rayed and his lungs scanned, particularly if he had been struggling for breath. She said he is also likely to have an electrocardiogram to check his heart's function, as well as tests on his oxygen levels, white blood cell count, and liver and kidney function before he is released from hospital. Mr Johnson has worked from home since it was announced that he had tested positive for coronavirus on 27 March. He was last seen in public applauding the NHS and other key workers from his flat in Downing Street on Thursday evening, and chaired a coronavirus meeting remotely on Friday morning. Later that day, the prime minister posted a Twitter video in which said he was still displaying minor symptoms. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionBoris Johnson posted a video message on Friday "I still have a temperature. So in accordance with government advice I must continue my self isolation until that symptom itself goes," he said. "But we're working clearly the whole time on our programme to beat the virus." On Saturday, his pregnant partner Carrie Symonds tweeted that she had spent a week in bed with the main symptoms. She said she had not been tested for the virus. Health Secretary Matt Hancock had also tested positive for the virus and returned from self-isolation on Thursday to host the daily Downing Street news conference. The government's chief medical adviser, Prof Chris Whitty, self-isolated after showing symptoms but has now recovered and is back at work. Tony Lloyd, Labour MP for Rochdale, has also been admitted to hospital for coronavirus treatment. Sir Keir wished him a "swift and full recovery" on Twitter on Monday afternoon. The news of Mr Johnson's admission to hospital came shortly after the Queen delivered a rallying message to the nation, saying the UK "will succeed" in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic. In a rare speech, the monarch thanked people for following government rules to stay at home and praised those "coming together to help others". In other developments: London's emergency services are setting up specialist teams to handle Covid-19 deaths that do not happen in hospital No 10 said 27,000 former healthcare professionals have registered to return to the NHS Around 13% of police officers and support staff are currently off work, the president of the Police Superintendents' Association of England and Wales has said Scotland's chief medical officer has resigned after making two trips to her second home - despite government guidance urging people to avoid unnecessary travel The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25% increase in calls and online requests for help since the lockdown, the charity Refuge says High street pharmacists are "needlessly being put at risk" due to a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE), the Royal Pharmaceutical Society says Train drivers' union Aslef is also calling for London Underground drivers to be provided with masks and gloves to protect them from contracting Covid-19 Young workers and the worst paid are the most likely to be affected by the closure of businesses because of coronavirus, according to research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies The Open Championship has been cancelled for the first time since World War Two. It had been due to take place in July How have you been affected by the issues relating to coronavirus? Share your experiences by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk. Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways: WhatsApp: +44 7756 165803 Tweet: @BBC_HaveYourSay Send pictures/video to yourpics@bbc.co.uk Upload your pictures / video here Please read our terms & conditions and privacy policy Or use the form below Your contact details Name (optional) Your E-mail address (required) Town & Country (optional) Your telephone number (optional) Comments (required) If you are happy to be contacted by a BBC journalist please leave a telephone number that we can contact you on. In some cases a selection of your comments will be published, displaying your name as you provide it and location, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. When sending us pictures, video or eyewitness accounts at no time should you endanger yourself or others, take any unnecessary risks or infringe any laws. Please ensure you have read the terms and conditions. Terms and conditions The BBC's Privacy Policy View the full article
  12. UCLan 3rd Year Criminal Investigation & Policing Student The aim of this study is to explore the perceptions that police officers and health and social practitioners have on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and the patterns to future offending. If you are currently a police officer or previously worked as a police officer, please can take 5/10 minutes of your time to complete my survey. Survey closes this Friday, please help if you can Please be aware this covers sensitive issues relating to Adverse Childhood Experiences / trauma so if this may distress you, please do not complete the survey. https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=gpn262sDxEyyAnrrGUxQZevs8HUVIGxBhXocCO0PbwtUN1ROSDVOWklVNERYN1pIS1BGQ0NURlNXNC4u
  13. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Spanish deaths fall for fourth consecutive day 6 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright Reuters Image caption The fall comes after a peak last Thursday, when 950 people died with the virus Spain has seen its daily number of coronavirus deaths fall for a fourth consecutive day, bolstering hopes the country is passing the outbreak's peak. Monday's increase of 637 deaths means more than 13,000 have died in total. Spain's population have been living under severe restrictions for more than three weeks, with lockdown measures now extended toward the end of April. The nation has more than 135,000 confirmed cases, the most in the world, but new infections have been slowing. Spanish officials say they plan to widen coronavirus testing to include those without symptoms. "We are preparing ourselves for de-escalation for which it is important to know who is contaminated to be able to gradually lift Spanish citizens' lockdown," Foreign Minister Arancha Gonzalez was quoted by Reuters as telling television station Antena 3. Live virus updates from around the world Coronavirus outbreak eats into EU unity The grim crisis in Europe's care homes The country has the second-highest death toll in the world from the virus, behind Italy. But Monday's figure is the lowest the country has recorded since March 24. It comes after Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez said at the weekend that some restrictions, including keeping non-essential workers at home, could be lifted after Easter. Speaking on Saturday, he said the country was "close to passing the peak of infections" but extended lockdown measures until 25 April, saying the restrictions were "saving lives". A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak VIDEO: The 20-second hand wash View the full article
  14. Bit of a thread bump, but in relation to what was being discussed here earlier, interesting that Guernsey has Special Constables that work in non-police forces that act as e.g. hospital security: [from Wiki] "'A' division special constables are full-time employees of third party agencies who are granted limited police powers within their workplace, to provide a first response whilst professional police officers are travelling to an incident; for example, a number of hospital porters are sworn as 'A' division special constables to provide an enhanced level of hospital security." They also appoint non-uniformed administrative 'B' Special Constables, for ICT work etc (as well as normal Specials).
  15. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Boris Johnson 'still in charge' despite hospital admission 6 April 2020 Image caption The PM took part in the clap for carers on Thursday outside No 11 Downing Street Prime Minister Boris Johnson is "still very much in charge of the government" despite spending the night in hospital with coronavirus, Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick has said. The PM was taken to a London hospital on Sunday evening with "persistent symptoms" - including a temperature - for a series of routine tests. It is said to be a "precautionary step" taken on the advice of his doctor. Mr Johnson, 55, tested positive for coronavirus 10 days ago. Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab will chair Monday morning's coronavirus meeting in his place, Mr Jenrick said. Last month, the prime minister's spokesman said if Mr Johnson was unwell and unable to work, Mr Raab, as the first secretary of state, would stand in. Mr Jenrick told BBC Breakfast: "We hope that as a result of these tests [the prime minister] will be able to come back to Downing Street as soon as possible. "He's been working extremely hard leading the government and being constantly updated. That's going to continue." "I'm sure this is very frustrating for him, for somebody like Boris who wants to be hands [on] running the government from the front, but nonetheless he's still very much in charge of the government," he added. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health US President Donald Trump is among those who has sent his wishes to Mr Johnson. "All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader," Mr Trump said, adding that he was sure the prime minister would be fine because he is "a strong person". And Labour leader Keir Starmer said he hoped the prime minister had a "speedy recovery". Health Minister Nadine Dorries, who herself tested positive for coronavirus last month, said many of those with the virus would be "felled" by fatigue and a high temperature and use isolation to sleep and recover. "Boris has risked his health and worked every day on our behalf to lead the battle against this vile virus," she said in a tweet. Coronavirus is straining the highest levels of government The prime minister, alongside the Queen, personifies the country's public response to this pandemic. And Boris Johnson is continuing to personally experience the unpleasant reality of the virus. Downing Street officials are adamant Mr Johnson remains in charge of the government and is in contact with ministerial colleagues and civil servants. But the undeniable reality is there is nothing conventional, nothing normal about this - however routine the tests are that the prime minister is receiving. The coronavirus has repeatedly proven its capacity to turn the far-fetched into reality, over and over again. Advisers, officials and ministerial colleagues have all been forced to self-isolate. Covid-19, the illness which the virus causes, is crippling the economy, robbing us of our usual liberties - and now it is straining the personal capacity of those at the highest level of government to respond to it. Dr Sarah Jarvis, a GP and broadcaster, told the BBC that Mr Johnson would be likely to have his chest X-rayed and his lungs scanned, particularly if he had been struggling for breath. She said he is also likely to have an electrocardiogram to check his heart's function, as well as tests on his oxygen levels, white blood cell count, and liver and kidney function before he is released from hospital. Mr Johnson has worked from home since it was announced that he had tested positive for coronavirus on 27 March. He was last seen in public applauding the NHS and other key workers from his flat in Downing Street on Thursday evening, and chaired a coronavirus meeting remotely on Friday morning. Also on Friday, the prime minister posted a Twitter video in which said he was still displaying minor symptoms. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionBoris Johnson posted a video message on Friday "I still have a temperature. So in accordance with government advice I must continue my self isolation until that symptom itself goes," he said. "But we're working clearly the whole time on our programme to beat the virus." On Saturday, his pregnant partner Carrie Symonds tweeted that she had spent a week in bed with the main symptoms. She said she had not been tested for the virus. Health Secretary Matt Hancock had also tested positive for the virus and returned from self-isolation on Thursday to host the daily Downing Street news conference. The government's chief medical adviser, Prof Chris Whitty, has also had to self-isolate after showing symptoms. The news of Mr Johnson's admission to hospital came shortly after the Queen delivered a rallying message to the nation, saying the UK "will succeed" in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic. In a rare speech, the monarch thanked people for following government rules to stay at home and praised those "coming together to help others". In other developments: Scotland's chief medical officer has resigned after making two trips to her second home - despite government guidance urging people to avoid unnecessary travel The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25% increase in calls and online requests for help since the lockdown, the charity Refuge says High street pharmacists are "needlessly being put at risk" due to a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE), the Royal Pharmaceutical Society says Young workers and the worst paid are the most likely to be affected by the closure of businesses because of coronavirus, according to research by the Institute for Fiscal Studies On Sunday the Department of Health said 621 more people had died in hospital in the UK after testing positive for coronavirus, taking the total death toll to 4,934. As of 09:00 BST on Sunday, 47,806 people had tested positive for coronavirus, the department said. How have you been affected by the issues relating to coronavirus? Share your experiences by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk. Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways: WhatsApp: +44 7756 165803 Tweet: @BBC_HaveYourSay Send pictures/video to yourpics@bbc.co.uk Upload your pictures / video here Please read our terms & conditions and privacy policy Or use the form below Your contact details Name (optional) Your E-mail address (required) Town & Country (optional) Your telephone number (optional) Comments (required) If you are happy to be contacted by a BBC journalist please leave a telephone number that we can contact you on. In some cases a selection of your comments will be published, displaying your name as you provide it and location, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. When sending us pictures, video or eyewitness accounts at no time should you endanger yourself or others, take any unnecessary risks or infringe any laws. Please ensure you have read the terms and conditions. Terms and conditions The BBC's Privacy Policy View the full article
  16. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: PM admitted to hospital over virus symptoms 6 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image caption The PM took part in the clap for carers on Thursday outside No 11 Downing Street Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been admitted to hospital for tests, 10 days after testing positive for coronavirus, Downing Street has said. He was taken to a London hospital on Sunday evening with "persistent symptoms" - including a temperature. It is said to be a "precautionary step" taken on the advice of his doctor. The prime minister remains in charge of the government, but the foreign secretary is expected to chair a coronavirus meeting on Monday morning. Mr Johnson is expected to stay overnight and is having what have been described as "routine tests", according to BBC Political Editor Laura Kuenssberg. In a statement, a Downing Street spokeswoman said: "On the advice of his doctor, the prime minister has tonight been admitted to hospital for tests. "This is a precautionary step, as the prime minister continues to have persistent symptoms of coronavirus 10 days after testing positive for the virus." She added: "The prime minister thanks NHS staff for all of their incredible hard work and urges the public to continue to follow the government's advice to stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives." A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health US President Donald Trump began a White House press briefing by sending "our nation's well wishes" for Mr Johnson's "own personal fight with the virus". "All Americans are praying for him. He's a great friend of mine, a great gentleman and a great leader," Mr Trump said, adding that he was sure the prime minister would be fine because he is "a strong person". Labour leader Keir Starmer also wished Mr Johnson well, saying he hoped for a "speedy recovery". Coronavirus is straining the highest levels of government The prime minister, alongside the Queen, personifies the country's public response to this pandemic. And Boris Johnson is continuing to personally experience the unpleasant reality of the virus. Downing Street officials are adamant Mr Johnson remains in charge of the government and is in contact with ministerial colleagues and civil servants. But the undeniable reality is there is nothing conventional, nothing normal about this - however routine the tests are that the prime minister is receiving. The coronavirus has repeatedly proven its capacity to turn the far-fetched into reality, over and over again. Advisers, officials and ministerial colleagues have all been forced to self-isolate. Covid-19, the illness which the virus causes, is crippling the economy, robbing us of our usual liberties - and now it is straining the personal capacity of those at the highest level of government to respond to it. Dr Sarah Jarvis, a GP and broadcaster, told the BBC that Mr Johnson would be likely to have his chest X-rayed and his lungs scanned, particularly if he had been struggling for breath. She said he is also likely to have an electrocardiogram to check his heart's function, as well as tests on his oxygen levels, white blood cell count, and liver and kidney function before he is released from hospital. Mr Johnson has worked from home since it was announced that he had tested positive for coronavirus on 27 March. He was last seen in public applauding the NHS and other key workers from his flat in Downing Street on Thursday evening, and chaired a coronavirus meeting remotely on Friday morning. Also on Friday, the prime minister posted a Twitter video in which said he was still displaying minor symptoms. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionBoris Johnson posted a video message on Friday "I still have a temperature. So in accordance with government advice I must continue my self isolation until that symptom itself goes," he said. "But we're working clearly the whole time on our programme to beat the virus." On Saturday, his pregnant partner Carrie Symonds tweeted that she has spent a week in bed with the main symptoms. She said she had not been tested for the virus. Health Secretary Matt Hancock had also tested positive for the virus and returned from self-isolation on Thursday to host the daily Downing Street news conference. The government's chief medical adviser, Prof Chris Whitty, has also had to self-isolate after showing symptoms. Last month, the prime minister's spokesman said if the prime minister was unwell and unable to work, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab, as the first secretary of state, would stand in. The news of Mr Johnson's admission to hospital came shortly after the Queen delivered a rallying message to the nation, saying the UK "will succeed" in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic. View the full article
  17. Last week
  18. This chap makes some good points I think.
  19. fbo194

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Scotland's chief medical officer has resigned after apologising for visiting her second home during the coronavirus lockdown. Dr Catherine Calderwood said she was "deeply sorry" and resigned "with a heavy heart". She said she agreed with First Minister Nicola Sturgeon that the "justifiable focus" on her behaviour risked distracting from the pandemic response. Dr Calderwood was given a police warning after making the trip to Fife. The chief medical officer was among those who have been urging the public to stay at home to save lives and protect the NHS. However, pictures of her during the a family trip to Earlsferry were published in The Scottish Sun. Ms Sturgeon said: "Dr Calderwood's advice to me, to the government and to people across Scotland over the past few weeks has been the right advice. People should continue to stay at home to protect the NHS and to save lives. "It is, however, clear that the mistake she made - even though she has apologised sincerely and honourably for it - risks distracting from and undermining confidence in the government's public health message at this crucial time. "That is not a risk either of us is willing to take." In her statement, Dr Calderwood said: "I am deeply sorry for my actions and the mistakes I have made. "The first minister and I have had a further conversation this evening and we have agreed that the justifiable focus on my behaviour risks becoming a distraction from the hugely important job that government and the medical profession has to do in getting the country through this coronavirus pandemic. "Having worked so hard on the government's response, that is the last thing I want." She said she would work to ensure a smooth transition to her successor. The first minister added that the "very serious mistake" made by Dr Calderwood should not detract from her "highly valuable contribution to the medical profession and to health in Scotland". https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-52177171 — Fantastic example to set to the nation...
  20. Old Ford Focus or Renault clio for the most part. They don't care because they just buy another off ebay motors when they lose it.
  21. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    New York new coronavirus cases 'dropping for first time' 5 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright Getty Images The number of infections and deaths in New York, the epicentre of the US coronavirus outbreak, is dropping for the first time, officials say. But in a news conference on Sunday, Governor Andrew Cuomo said it is too early to know the data's significance. It comes as the virus continues to spread around the US and health officials say the worst is yet to come. The US Surgeon General warned that this will be "the hardest and the saddest week of most Americans' lives". "This is going to be our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment," Surgeon General Jerome Adams told Fox News on Sunday. "Only it's not going to be localised. It's going to be happening all over the country and I want America to understand that." Across the US more than 331,151 people have been infected and over 9,420 have died. What's the latest in New York? On Sunday, Mr Cuomo reported 594 new deaths for a total of 4,159 deaths in New York, the state hit hardest by the coronavirus so far. He said there are now 122,000 New York residents who have been infected. But he added that nearly 75% of patients who have required hospitalisation have now been discharged. Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Bodies are loaded onto a refrigerated lorry which is serving as a makeshift morgue. Patients requiring hospital are down for the first time in a week, and deaths are down from the prior day, he said. There were 630 deaths reported in the previous 24 hours. "The coronavirus is truly vicious and effective at what the virus does," he told reporters in Albany, the state's capitol. "It's an effective killer." It's too early to know if New York is currently experiencing its apex - the highest rate of infection that graphics behind Mr Cuomo referred to as "the Battle on the Mountain Top". He also said it is too early to know if cases will drop off quickly after the apex, or if they will decline slowly - and at a rate that still will overwhelm hospitals. "The statisticians will not give you a straight answer on anything," he said about the so-called "curve" - the chart that tracks the rate of infections. "At first it was straight up and straight down, or a total 'V'. Or maybe its up with a plateau and we're somewhere on the plateau. They don't know." Mr Cuomo said that despite "cabin fever" from staying home, people must continue to remain inside except for essential activities such as exercise and food shopping. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionPresident Trump: "We want as few lives lost as possible" New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in a news conference that the city had enough ventilators to last until Tuesday or Wednesday, after initially saying that the state could run out by Sunday. "We have bought a few more days," he declared, adding that the city had distributed 2,865 ventilators and had 135 left in the stockpile. "I want to be clear, it only means a few more days, nothing more I can guarantee beyond that," he told reporters. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak VIDEO: The 20-second hand wash What is the situation around the US? Infection rates and new deaths are growing in cities such as Washington DC, Detroit and New Orleans, even as around 90% of Americans are under some form of mandatory lockdown requiring them to stay home. Governors of states continue to warn of a dire shortage of needed medical supplies, including ventilators and face masks. New Jersey, a state that borders New York, reported more than 3,000 new infections on Sunday, bringing the state-wide total to 37,505. There have been 917 coronavirus-related deaths in New Jersey. The southern state of Louisiana - one of the hardest hit in the US - reported a 20% increase on Sunday with 3,010 new cases. It also reported 477 deaths. Michigan - with the third worst outbreak in the US - has suffered nearly 16,000 cases and 617 deaths, officials said on Sunday. Detroit continues to be the state's major hotspot with nearly 5,000 cases and 158 deaths. Speaking to NBC News on Sunday, Dr Anthony Fauci - the nation's chief immunologist - said its too early to say the situation is "under control," as President Donald Trump has frequently claimed. "That would be a false statement. We are struggling to get it under control and that's the issue that's at hand right now." Surgeon General Adams said that California and Washington have seen their transmission rates slow due to mitigation efforts, but warned that everyone must follow the federal government's health guidance, including wearing a face mask in public. "I want Americans to understand that, as hard as this week is going to be, there is a light at the end of the tunnel if everyone does their part for the next 30 days," he said. Elsewhere in the US: Several governors say Mr Trump should issue a national 'stay-at-home' order, after nine mostly southern and Midwestern states have resisted enforcing a lockdown A pastor in Florida, who has already been hit with several misdemeanours, says he will defy orders banning large gatherings to hold a Palm Sunday celebration The White House is not holding its daily Covid-19 briefing, due to the Christian holiday Mr Trump says he will defy the government's guidance to wear masks in public, after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced the new mandate last week View the full article
  22. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Queen tells UK 'we will succeed' in fight 5 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright Buckingham Palace The Queen has said the UK "will succeed" in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic, in a rallying message to the nation. In a rare speech, the monarch thanked people for following government rules to stay at home and praised those "coming together to help others". She also thanked key workers, saying "every hour" of work "brings us closer to a return to more normal times". It comes as the number of people to die with the virus in the UK reached 4,934. 'We will meet again' "While we have faced challenges before, this one is different," the Queen said. "This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour, using the great advances of science and our instinctive compassion to heal. We will succeed - and that success will belong to every one of us. "We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return: we will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again." The Queen, 93, also said the "painful sense of separation from their loved ones" that social distancing was causing for people reminded her of the experience child evacuees had during the Second World War. "Now, as then, we know, deep down, that it is the right thing to do," she said. Image copyright PA Wire Image caption The monarch said she was reminded of her first radio broadcast, in 1940, when she and her sister Princess Margaret spoke to child evacuees The monarch said everyone who was following guidance to stay at home was "helping to protect the vulnerable and sparing many families the pain already felt by those who have lost loved ones". "Together we are tackling this disease, and I want to reassure you that if we remain united and resolute, then we will overcome it," she added. 'Ambitious message' to inspire nation There have been difficult speeches and addresses in the past - times when the wrong word or the wrong phrase could have undermined the message or let slip a critical opportunity. The broadcast after the death of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997 for example, or the speech the Queen gave on her visit to Ireland in 2011. The Palace could have played it safe, stressed unity and given thanks. It would have served. This was a different and much more ambitious broadcast, designed to reassure and to inspire. But most of all to recast this crisis as a defining moment in a nation which will forever remember its collective effort to save the lives of its vulnerable. Read more here. The message was filmed by a single cameraman wearing protective equipment, with all the other technical staff in another room. It was broadcast on TV, radio and social media channels. The Queen's broadcast in full The decision to deliver the address was made "in close consultation with Downing Street", BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell said. The Queen's four other special addresses It is only the fifth time the monarch has given such a speech in her 68-year reign. While her Christmas Day message is an annual event, only rarely has the Queen made rallying speeches at key moments in the life of the nation: A televised speech to celebrate her Diamond Jubilee in June 2012 A special address to the nation on the eve of her mother's funeral in April 2002 A live broadcast on the eve of the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales, in September 1997 And a statement at the beginning of the land war in Iraq on 24 February 1991 Read more here. The Queen's address came less than a week after her son, the Prince of Wales, came out of self-isolation, following his coronavirus diagnosis. Prince Charles, 71, spent seven days self-isolating in Scotland after testing positive and displaying mild symptoms. On Sunday the UK government's Health Secretary Matt Hancock urged the public to follow social distancing rules over a sunny weekend to protect the NHS and slow the spread of the virus. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health The Department of Health said on Sunday there had been 621 more coronavirus-related deaths in the UK in the past day. The latest deaths include 12 more in Wales, seven in Northern Ireland and two in Scotland. As of 09:00 BST on Sunday, 47,806 people had tested positive for the virus, the Department of Health said. View the full article
  23. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Queen tells UK 'we will succeed' in fight 5 April 2020 The Queen has said the UK "will succeed" in its fight against the coronavirus pandemic, in a rallying message to the nation. In a rare speech, the monarch thanked people for following government rules to stay at home and praised those "coming together to help others". She also thanked key workers, saying "every hour" of work "brings us closer to a return to more normal times". It comes as the number of people to die with the virus in the UK reached 4,934. 'We will meet again' "While we have faced challenges before, this one is different," the Queen said. "This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour, using the great advances of science and our instinctive compassion to heal. We will succeed - and that success will belong to every one of us. "We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return: we will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again." The Queen, 93, also said the "painful sense of separation from their loved ones" that social distancing was causing for people reminded her of the experience child evacuees had during the Second World War. "Now, as then, we know, deep down, that it is the right thing to do," she said. She said everyone who was following guidance to stay at home was "helping to protect the vulnerable and sparing many families the pain already felt by those who have lost loved ones". "Together we are tackling this disease, and I want to reassure you that if we remain united and resolute, then we will overcome it," she added. The message was filmed by a single cameraman wearing protective equipment, with all the other technical staff in another room. It is being broadcast on TV, radio and social media channels. The decision to deliver the address was made "in close consultation with Downing Street", BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell said. The Queen's four other special addresses It is only the fifth time the monarch has given such a speech in her 68-year reign. While her Christmas Day message is an annual event, only rarely has the Queen made rallying speeches at key moments in the life of the nation: A televised speech to celebrate her Diamond Jubilee in June 2012 A special address to the nation on the eve of her mother's funeral in April 2002 A live broadcast on the eve of the funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales, in September 1997 And a statement at the beginning of the land war in Iraq on 24 February 1991 Read more here. The Queen's address came less than a week after her son, the Prince of Wales, came out of self-isolation, following his coronavirus diagnosis. Prince Charles, 71, spent seven days self-isolating in Scotland after testing positive and displaying mild symptoms. On Sunday the UK government's Health Secretary Matt Hancock urged the public to follow social distancing rules over a sunny weekend to protect the NHS and slow the spread of the virus. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? AVOIDING CONTACT: The rules on self-isolation and exercise LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health The Department of Health said on Sunday there had been 621 more coronavirus-related deaths in the UK in the past day. The latest deaths include 12 more in Wales, seven in Northern Ireland and two in Scotland. As of 09:00 BST on Sunday, 47,806 people had tested positive for the virus, the Department of Health said. View the full article
  24. fbo194

    Spanish police arrest during quarintine

    Good to see that their deaths have finally started to fall. They've also ditched that awful Eurpoean siren on that car in the clip, hurrah.
  25. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Exercise out of the home 'could be banned' if people flout rules 5 April 2020 comments Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright PA Media Image caption Government guidance says people should only exercise once a day - alone or with members of your household Exercise outside the home could be banned if people ignore the lockdown rules on staying at home and social distancing, the health secretary said. Matt Hancock told the BBC's Andrew Marr that the government would "take action" if further measures are needed to bring the coronavirus under control. It comes after reports of groups of people gathering in parks during sunny weather this weekend. The latest death toll in the UK reached 4,313 on Saturday. Mr Hancock said: "If you don't want us to have to take the step to ban exercise of all forms outside of your own home, then you've got to follow the rules." The health secretary said the vast majority were sticking to the guidelines, adding: "Let's not have a minority spoil it for everybody." What powers do the police have to fight coronavirus? He said the timing of restrictions being lifted would depend on how people behave, adding that "the more people stay at home the less the virus will spread". Speaking to Sky's Sophy Ridge earlier, Mr Hancock said sunbathing in public spaces was against the government's coronavirus social distancing rules. A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health It comes after Brighton and Hove City Council tweeted on Saturday that too many people were meeting up with friends on the seafront, making social distancing "impossible". Sussex Police said two people had been summonsed to attend court after having a barbecue on Hove beach. Meanwhile, Lambeth Council in south London said Brockwell Park would be closed on Sunday after more than 3,000 people spent the day there sunbathing or in large groups on Saturday. Restrictions state that everybody must stay at home where possible, and only leave if they have a "reasonable excuse", such as exercise or shopping for basic necessities. Prime Minister Boris Johnson tweeted his thanks to "everyone who is saving lives by staying at home this weekend". "I know it's tough, but if we all work together and follow the guidance we will beat coronavirus," he said. Image copyright Reuters Image caption Members of the public have been urged to stay at home during this weekend's warmer weather Mr Hancock said the physical and mental health benefits of exercise were "really important", and that did not want to remove exercise as a reason to leave home. But he added: "If the result of that is that too many people go out and flout the other rules because they say 'well if I can exercise then it's fine for me to do other things' then I'm afraid we will have to take action." New Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer said the party would support the government it if decides to take the step of introducing further restrictions, such as a ban on exercising outside the home. Also on the BBC's Andrew Marr show, Mr Hancock said that the number of ventilators needed over the coming weeks will be 18,000, and that currently there are between 9,000 and 10,000 within the NHS. When asked about the number of nurses that had died of coronavirus, Mr Hancock said the latest figure was three deaths. Earlier, Mr Hancock told Sky it was "quite unbelievable" that a minority of the public are not following the lockdown social distancing advice. The health secretary also dismissed speculation that he and Chancellor Rishi Sunak have different opinions about when to lift the strict measures. "We're working very closely together," he said. "What matters is that we get out of this as soon as possible." At Saturday's daily briefing, cabinet minister Michael Gove said people must respect the lockdown and that it might be that some of the government's messages had not reached some segments of the population. "It may be that young people feel that they are less likely to be affected and less likely to be infected," he added. In other developments: The Queen will make a rare special address to the nation on Sunday - broadcast on TV, radio and social media at 20:00 BST The new Labour leader, Sir Keir Starmer, has accused the government of making "serious mistakes" in its response to the coronavirus Scotland's chief medical officer has apologised "unreservedly" for visiting her second home in Fife during the lockdown The culture secretary is planning to hold virtual meetings with tech firms over their response to conspiracy theories linking 5G networks to the pandemic The Foreign Office said it is now working with 14 commercial airlines to help thousands of Britons still stranded abroad amid the pandemic, with seven charter flights to bring travellers home from India in the coming week Convenience stores on the outskirts of towns and in rural areas are experiencing a surge in sales - as people turn to them for essentials during the lockdown A drive-through coronavirus testing centre for frontline NHS staff is due to open at Glasgow Airport's long-stay car park on Sunday afternoon View the full article
  26. Definitely a non story. The Met wants to update it's current elderly fleet of Jankels, presumably with a vehicle of similar spec. From the tone of the story you'd think they were looking to buy tanks.
  27. Chief Bakes

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Coronavirus: Queen to urge 'self-discipline and resolve' 4 April 2020 Related TopicsCoronavirus pandemic Image copyright PA Media Image caption The Queen will reflect on the "enormous changes" to daily life The Queen is to stress the value of self-discipline and resolve during the coronavirus pandemic in a special address to the nation on Sunday. In a rare speech, she will acknowledge the grief, pain and financial difficulties Britons are facing during this "time of disruption". She will also thank NHS staff and key workers, and emphasise the important role individuals can play. Her address will be broadcast on TV, radio and social media at 20:00 BST. The Queen is expected to say: "I am speaking to you at what I know is an increasingly challenging time. "A time of disruption in the life of our country: a disruption that has brought grief to some, financial difficulties to many, and enormous changes to the daily lives of us all." LIVE UPDATES: China holds day of remembrance A SIMPLE GUIDE: How do I protect myself? LOOK-UP TOOL: Check cases in your area MAPS AND CHARTS: Visual guide to the outbreak STRESS: How to look after your mental health She will add: "I hope in the years to come everyone will be able to take pride in how they responded to this challenge. "And those who come after us will say that the Britons of this generation were as strong as any. "That the attributes of self-discipline, of quiet good-humoured resolve and of fellow-feeling still characterise this country." The message was filmed by a single cameraman wearing protective equipment, with all the other technical staff in another room. It will be intended to reassure and rally people, BBC royal correspondent Nicholas Witchell said. The decision to deliver the address has been made "in close consultation with Downing Street", he added. It comes as the number of deaths in the UK reached 4,313 on Saturday - up by 708 on Friday's figure. Of those, 212 were in the Midlands, compared with 127 in London - until now the worst affected part of the UK. Image copyright Kensington Palace Image caption The Queen conducted her weekly audience with the prime minister on the telephone last week. A five-year-old child with underlying health conditions is among those whose deaths were most recently reported. In the government's daily briefing on Saturday, NHS England medical director Stephen Powis said there was some evidence that social distancing measures were reducing transmission, and that the latest figures suggested new cases had begun to "stabilise". However, he stressed that it was not the time to "take our foot off the pedal". Meanwhile, Prime Minister Boris Johnson remains in self-isolation in Downing Street after testing positive for coronavirus, while his pregnant fiancee Carrie Symonds tweeted that she has spent a week in bed with symptoms. The Queen's address will come less than a week after the Prince of Wales came out of self-isolation, following his diagnosis of coronavirus. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionPrince Charles opens the UK's first emergency field hospital to deal with coronavirus patients. Prince Charles, 71, spent seven days self-isolating in Scotland after testing positive and displaying mild symptoms. On Friday, he opened the NHS Nightingale Hospital in London via video link. Buckingham Palace previously said the Queen last saw her son, the heir to the throne, on 12 March, and was "in good health". View the full article
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