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  1. Today
  2. I am doing my university dissertation on Authoritarianism in Police Officers and University Students. If you are a new Police Officer (joined in the last 6 months) or a Police Officer who has completed their 2 year probationary period (in the last 12 months) then please click the following link for more information and to complete a short online survey on Authoritarianism! https://aber.onlinesurveys.ac.uk/dissertation-survey-2 If you know of anyone that fits the criteria then please encourage them to complete the survey too. Thank you.
  3. Imran-Ali96

    Tasers for for special constable and New police

    Yeah i understand where you are coming from, however personally i think it is good piece of equiment giving to officers and sc simply because you never know whats going to happen whilst on duty.
  4. Beaker

    Tasers for for special constable and New police

    It will happen eventually, however even when they say we can have it I wouldn't hold my breath. We need to see the majority of regs who want it to be carrying first, and even then we won't all get it. I would guess it will be 3-5 years after they authorise us to carry that there is any meaningful uplift amoung SCs for it. Even then if you're planning on joining the regs I'd suggest you won't be in the SC list because why spend a massive chunk of SC budget on someone who will be leaving in a short time?
  5. A man who ran a dark web business selling the lethal drug fentanyl to customers across the UK and worldwide has been jailed for nine years. Justas Bieksa, 34, from Tresham Green, Northampton, was sentenced today (Thursday 12 December) at Derby Crown Court after pleading guilty to supplying and importing class A and B drugs. Bieksa sold fentanyl, which is up to 100 times stronger than morphine, and its analogues carfentanyl and furanyl, which are around 10,000 times stronger. He also sold ethyl-hexedrone crystals, a Class B drug commonly known as Hexen. Bieksa traded under business name ‘UKchemSale’, and users, who were offered next day delivery, paid for the drugs using the online currency bitcoin. The UKchemSale site sold fentanyl to at least 52 customers, with reviews including: “NDD [Next Day Delivery], excellent packaging, 5th successful order, this batch of fent HCL is as good as last thank-you, I've been taking fent for about a year and the quality is up there will the best and these days hard to come by, this is now the only decent fent HCL vendor in UK". NCA Senior Investigating Officer Jim Cook said: “Fentanyl and its analogues, which Bieksa was selling, are extremely dangerous. Even a tiny amount could kill a user. “Not only is fentanyl potentially lethal for those taking it, these drugs pose a serious danger to all those that come into contact with them – be that first responders like law enforcement and medical staff, or in this case postal staff. “While fentanyl and analogues remain a threat due to their potency, law enforcement action has had a significant impact on UK-based suppliers like Bieksa.” NCA officers started their investigation into Bieksa after he joined a dark web forum on 5 July 2017. Bieksa was arrested at his home on the morning of 14 September 2019. Officers seized two laptops, one of which was encrypted, plus drug testing kits, electronic scales, envelopes and packaging. Forensic analysis of Bieksa’s laptop found a history of orders for synthetic drugs from China for onward supply to others. Jim Cook added: “Bieksa knew these drugs were life-threatening yet he continued to import and sell them, using any means he could, for his own financial gain. “The jail time handed to him today is a reflection on his dangerous and calculated actions. “The NCA continues to work with law enforcement partners, using all the tools at our collective disposal to tackle this worldwide threat.” 28 January 2020 View the full article
  6. A trial of Extinction Rebellion protesters has collapsed after what a judge described as an “abject failure” by the Crown Prosecution Service. https://home.bt.com/news/uk-news/trial-of-extinction-rebellion-protesters-collapses-after-abject-failure-by-cps-11364428279974
  7. HI, i am a university student at teesside university and have a research proposal that is based on trauma and those serving in the police. I have linked the questionnaire link and it would be greatly appreciated if any currently serving police officers and police specialists could fill it out. my previous link was incorrect so had to amend, thank you very much Liam. https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/9PP5ZBH
  8. Yesterday
  9. Zulu 22

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    The Panorama program on BBC1 tonight was interesting, alarming and frightening. The advice in the 1st lane (Old Hard shoulder) is to exit the car and get behind the barriers. The official advice for stopping in the other lanes is to put your hazard lights on and remain in the vehicle. They interviewed Grant Shapps, the minister for roads, who reiterated this advice. The AA and other motoring organisations condemn this advice. It also gave the facts that 1) the average time before your vehicle is recognised as being stopped is 17 minutes. 2) The average time for closing of the lane with the gantry lights is 3 minutes. 3) The average time, after all of this, for assistance reaching you is 17 minutes. 4) Fatalities on Smart Motorways are far higher than conventional motorways with a hard shoulder. It gave details with one vehicle which broke down in the inside lane that it was stationary for 45 seconds before the stoppage turned fatal. The first trials were on the M42 with safety emergency stopping areas were 600 yards apart. This allowed the authorisation for the schemes to be implemented on other motorways but, for some inexplicable reason thee stopping area's are anything from 1 1/2 mile to 2 1/2 miles apart. The only sensible action is to close all inner lanes returning them into hard shoulders for broken down vehicles and emergency vehicles only.
  10. Hi, I have read couple of article saying Special constable and new police officers could be issues with tasers i have read few articles not sure if its true or not. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7439455/Special-constables-Tasers-time.html _____________________________________________________________________________________________ https://asco.police.uk/our-work/taser/ _________________________________________________________________________________________________--
  11. BlueBob

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    That is pretty much my query, were these incidents BECAUSE of using the hard shoulder or was it simply on a motorway with one. If they weren’t on the hard shoulder/ smart lane but a prang in lanes 3+4 etc then the negatives and arguments against them are mute, they then become little different to a multi lane dual carriageway
  12. Member of Public

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    To call these disaster zones 'smart' is nothing short of an insult. I dislike these roads so much, that I actively avoid driving on them and will take the long way in order to do so. If I ever do find myself travelling through a stretch of one of these 'smart' motorways, I will simply refuse to use the extra lane because, in my mind, it should be a safe refuge for anyone who breaks down. I will utterly ignore that lane and treat it as if it were still a hard shoulder. The only time I would enter it is to take an exit, for obvious safety reasons to avoid cutting up anyone who is using it. Another cock up by this incompetent, pathetic excuse for a government.
  13. Zulu 22

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    Had the vehicles broken down or been stationary on a hard shoulder no other traffic would have been on that hard shoulder traveling at 70 mph. When it was featured on the TV news stations it was estimated that it takes up to 10 minutes to put a motorway "X" lane blocking sign into operation. That means that there is a stationary object in an active lane for 10 minutes. That is a prescription for disaster. The refuge points are every mile and it is unlikely that you are going to break down at one of those spots. Motorists are advised to exit their vehicles and get over the safety barriers. In the time that it takes for a driver top exit the vehicle, into a live lane, and take refuge is a huge danger. If you then add to that time having to get passengers out of the vehicle, especially if you have children in the rear, perhaps in a child safety seat you can see the recipe for disaster written all over the scenario. You have to take account that a high percentage of motorists whose driving ability is far from safe or ideal.
  14. I would appreciate if students in this forum would take a few minutes to fill in my survey regarding Anti-Social Behaviour for my study. https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/TDHZP2L
  15. Hello, thank you for taking the time to read this, I am a university student in the midst of completing my research proposal based upon stigma against mental health in the police. In order to complete this I need responses for those who wish to help out. It does include some personal questions if you are uncomfortable answering but it is anonymous. Thanks again, Brad https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HGPNLG3
  16. HI, i am a university student at teesside university and have a research proposal that is based on trauma and those serving in the police. I have linked the questionnaire link and it would be greatly appreciated if any currently serving police officers and police specialists could fill it out. Thank you very much Liam. https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/HGPNLG3
  17. BlueBob

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    Firstly I’m not keen on smart motorways. But I wonder if the stats are saying it was th SM structure / system that was related to the incidents or, could . Would of them have occurred regardless of the SM being in effect?
  18. Two men who hid £60 million worth of cocaine on a yacht travelling from South America to the UK have been jailed for a total of 33 years for drug smuggling, and had their assets restrained, after a National Crime Agency investigation. In August 2019, the NCA, working closely with the Spanish National Police, identified the SY Atrevido as carrying a large cocaine shipment. The Border Force cutter HMC Protector was dispatched to intercept the yacht, locating it approximately half a mile off the coast of Wales in the early hours of Tuesday 27 August 2019. British nationals, Gary Swift, 53, and Scott Kilgour, 41, both from Liverpool, were arrested on board. The vessel was escorted into Fishguard port where NCA officers and Border Force’s Deep Rummage team carried out a search, discovering 751 kilos of cocaine with a purity of up to 83%. The quantity found would have had a wholesale value of around £24 million and a potential street value of £60 million once cut. As part of the parallel financial investigation, the NCA has seized the SY Atrevido, as well as a second sailing yacht, the SY Mistral, both believed to have been used by the OCG, as well as three Rolex watches, a Panerai watch, and Tag Heuer watch. Investigators have also obtained court orders to restrain a third sailing yacht, caravans, five cars, two vans, and a house in France. Upon arrest, Swift said to officers: “I just want to say that I am guilty. I have got something substantial on the boat and they will find it.” He later admitted “I’m the bad one here,” and asked custody officers to pass a message to the NCA revealing the number of packages on board the yacht. In December 2018, Kilgour had bought the vessel, paying €50,000 for it from a seller in Mallorca, Spain. Swift and Kilgour were sentenced to 19 years 6 months and 13 years 6 months respectively today (Monday 27 January) at Swansea Crown Court, after pleading guilty to importing class A drugs into the UK at an earlier hearing. Four others – three men aged 23, 31, 47, and a woman aged 30 – arrested in Liverpool and Loughborough in connection with the seizure remain on bail. Jayne Lloyd, NCA Regional Head of Investigations, said: “Today’s result shows what will happen if you try to flood our streets with millions of pounds worth of potentially deadly drugs – you will be caught and you will face the consequences. “Drugs aren’t just damaging to the people that take them, they fuel violence and exploitation, damaging communities and leaving destruction in their wake. “It’s thanks to the work of the NCA, Border Force officers, and the Spanish National Police, that two highly organised criminals are behind bars and that these drugs haven’t made their way onto the streets. “Our investigation does not stop here; we are now going after their assets to strip them of their illicit wealth and make sure they don’t profit from their crimes." Deputy Director Steve Whitton, from Border Force’s Maritime Command, said: “The work of the crew of HMC Protector, as well as our specialist deep rummage search officers, played a crucial role in this case. Their work was a key part of an investigation which has ultimately put two significant drug smugglers behind bars. “Border Force’s maritime teams will continue to work closely with the NCA to ensure organised criminals like Swift and Kilgour are caught and brought to justice.” 27 January 2020 View the full article
  19. Interesting, I am interested but living in London I doubt I'd ever be called up.
  20. Zulu 22

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    The inherent dangers were pointed out well before the "Smart Motorways" were introduced. Smart is, perhaps the most stupid name for them. According to the reports it takes many minute to identify a broken down/stopped vehicle and operate the closed lane signs. In those minutes, literally hundreds of vehicles have passed the scene. The hard shoulder could be dangerous but that was because of serious driver error. The hard shoulder was also a safe route for Emergency vehicles trying to reach a Motorway incident scene. It would not surprise me if they were thought up by someone with little, if any, experience of driving, especially Motorways. Motorways have always posed dangers perhaps highlighted by the tragic death of a Traffic Officer on the M6 in Cumbria.
  21. A POLICE officer has died after his patrol car crashed and reportedly burst into flames while he was responding to an blue-light call today. https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/10824582/police-car-crash-m6-closed-lanes-motorway-cumbria/
  22. I've just read it and unless I'm missing something the parts on legislation.gov in brackets are deregulated.
  23. Last week
  24. In a 3 month period I think I went to 3, maybe 4 fatals on a smart stretch of “smart” M1. How the government/HE haven’t faced massive backlash or civil cases from the families is beyond me
  25. Radman

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    I live very close to a section of Smart Motorway where numerous motorists have been killed over the last few years. I personally think they are a danger and we should see the back of them.
  26. skydiver

    38 killed on smart motorways in last five years

    I have never trusted smart motorways, but I guess its all relative as normal motorways have their own dangers. The biggest drawback is that drivers who break down have to rely on other road users noticing that lane 1 is closed, but half the time you can't trust them to take notice of standard road signs, breaking distance, indicators, speed limits, keep left, lane restrictions etc. Driver get killed on the hard shoulders of regula motorways but at least they are using dedicated lanes and don't have to rely on a X in a gantry to stop people using it.
  27. Thirty-eight people have been killed on smart motorways in the last five years, the government has told BBC Panorama. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-51236375
  28. I think the point is that we don't actually know what evidence was presented to the jury and what they were directed to find a verdict on. Just because we want him to be found guilty of attempted murder doesn't mean that this was an option open to the jury to decide on. The evidence was presented and argued in court, the jury would then have been directed by the judge based on that and having read that thread from the Secret Barrister and some of the information from the MoJ they jury found him guilty of the most serious offences they could and he was sentenced to the maximum sentence that could be had in those circumstances. Justice has prevailed and the full force of the laws available (or that had a chance of conviction with the longest sentences) of this land have been enforced.
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