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  2. Policey_Man

    Temp. Accommodation for Hendon

    Is there any chance of you asking Met Training if you can do your initial training at Marlow House, in SE London instead, if that's any better? If not, ask about the section House? I believe we still have one left....
  3. Today
  4. Gangs targeted in a week of coordinated law enforcement activity across the UK 21 May 2019 County Lines drug gangs have been targeted in a week of coordinated law enforcement activity across the UK, leading to more than 500 arrests, £312,649 cash and 46 weapons seized. The activity, co-ordinated by the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC), which is jointly run by the NCA and NPCC, was led by police forces and Regional Organised Crime Units (ROCUs). Over the week activity included warrants at addresses, visits to vulnerable people including those at risk of cuckooing, and engagement with private hire companies and others who are being exploited by county lines networks. Between 13 and 20 May: - 500 men and 86 women were arrested; - 519 vulnerable adults and 364 children were engaged for safeguarding purposes; - There were more than 30 referrals to the National Referral Mechanism (NRM), which assesses individuals as potential victims of human trafficking/modern slavery; - Officers seized cash totalling £312,649; - 46 weapons were seized, including four firearms, swords, machetes, an axe, knives, samurai swords, and a crossbow Significant amounts of drugs were recovered, including: £176,780 worth of Cocaine £36,550 worth of Crack Cocaine £17,950 worth of Heroin Complex problem National Crime Agency County Lines lead and Director of Investigations Nikki Holland, said: “Tackling county lines and the misery it causes is a national law enforcement priority and these results demonstrate the power of a whole-system response to a complex problem that we’re seeing in every area of the UK. “We know that criminal networks use high levels of violence, exploitation and abuse to ensure compliance from the vulnerable people they employ to do the day-to-day drug supply activity. “Thanks to the hard work of law enforcement officers there are now fewer drugs on the streets, more vulnerable people safeguarded and the public can be reassured that collectively we are committed to tackling serious and organised crime offenders and safeguarding victims. “ Young people and vulnerable adults are exposed to physical, mental and sexual abuse, and in some instances will be trafficked to areas a long way from home as part of the network’s drug dealing business. The grooming techniques seen as part of County Lines are similar to what has been seen in child sexual exploitation and abuse, and often the young people don’t see themselves as victims. Instead they are flattered by the attention and gifts they receive, so are less likely to speak to law enforcement. National Police Chiefs’ Council lead for County Lines, Deputy Assistant Commissioner Duncan Ball, said: “The past week has seen police forces work together across the UK to send a clear message that we will do everything possible to dismantle County Lines gangs and protect the vulnerable being exploited by them. “The large number of arrests and weapons seizures is testament to the hard work and dedication of officers across the country, the National County Lines Co-ordination Centre and the support of key partners like social care, the NHS, schools and the charity sector. “Tackling County Lines is not something we can do alone and we need the public to help us by reporting any information or concerns. You can give your information anonymously to Crimestoppers and help us pursue and prosecute those who commit violence and exploit the vulnerable.” Victoria Atkins, Minister for Crime Safeguarding and Vulnerability said: “As a government we are determined to crack down on County Lines, disrupt the networks devastating communities and put an end to the violence and exploitation of children and vulnerable adults. “Our Serious Violence Strategy includes a range of actions to enhance our response to this issue, and a multi-agency approach is key. That’s why we invested over £3.6m to establish the new National County Lines Co-ordination Centre, which has improved intelligence and supports cross border efforts to tackle this serious issue. “But it’s also imperative that we steer young people away from a life of crime in the first place, and our £22m Early Intervention Youth Fund is already funding six projects that specifically address those at risk of involvement in county lines including early intervention and outreach programmes.” The NCLCC is appealing to professionals who work with young people and vulnerable adults at risk of being exploited by County Lines gangs to report concerns. Progress Director Nikki Holland added: “We are making progress in our fight against County Lines but we need the help of professionals working with people at risk of being involved in or exploited by County Lines. It’s the nurses, teachers, social workers, GPs, and anyone who works with young or vulnerable people, that can really help to make a difference.” Some of signs of County Lines are: - An increase in visitors or cars to a house or flat, or regularly changing residents; - Substance misuse or drug paraphernalia; - Changes in young people: new unaffordable belongings, clothing or items - They may travel a lot or go missing regularly and be reluctant to reveal where to or why; - They may develop friendships with older people or have unexplained injuries. The National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC), which is jointly led by the NCA and the National Police Chief’s Council (NPCC), is responsible for mapping out the threat from county lines nationally and prioritising action against the most significant perpetrators. It provides support to front line officers and is working to deepen the partnerships with non-law enforcement organisations to enhance the wider national response. Since its launch in September 2018, the intelligence picture around county lines has increased, as has law enforcement’s understanding of the threat. The number of lines is now around 2,000 and figures from National Referral Mechanism released recently showed the number of modern slavery cases involving UK minors went from 676 in 2017 to 1,421 in 2018. Anyone with concerns about County Lines can speak to local police on 101 or call 999 in an emergency. If you’d rather stay anonymous you can call the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111. If you are a young person who is worried about being involved in County Lines, or knows someone who is, you can speak to an adult and let them know how you feel. You can also contact www.fearless.org who allow you to pass on information about crime anonymously. You can also contact Childline on 0800 1111 – they are a private and confidential service where you can talk to counsellors about anything that is worrying you. View the full article
  5. Indiana Jones

    Plain Clothes Operations

    Some police people like to reference RIPA in tbe same way thay many members of the public fall back to GDPR and "data protection". When you come down to it, their actual understanding if it is minimal.
  6. Reasonable Man

    Promotions as a PCSO

    Or any other police staff role within the force.
  7. Police arrest 586 people in county lines crackdown 21 May 2019 Related TopicsCounty lines drugs trade Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionPolice tackle county lines drug operations in Hastings Nearly 600 suspected members of county lines drugs gangs have been arrested across the UK in the past week, the National Crime Agency has said. Police forces led by the National County Lines Coordination Centre also seized cocaine worth £176,780; £312,649 in cash; and 46 weapons. The NCA estimates there are about 2,000 city-based gangs exploiting young people to sell drugs in smaller towns. It says tackling the gangs is a "national law enforcement priority". In the operation between 13 and 20 May: 500 men and 86 women were arrested 519 vulnerable adults and 364 children in need of support were helped 30 people were identified as potential victims of slavery or human trafficking Four guns were seized, as well as swords, machetes, an axe, knives, samurai swords, and a crossbow Drugs including cocaine with a street value of £176,780, crack worth £36,550 and £17,950 of heroin were recovered County line drugs gangs groom young people and vulnerable adults to courier drugs from urban centres into more rural areas. NCA County Lines lead Nikki Holland said the latest police operation "demonstrated the power of a whole-system response to a complex problem that we're seeing in every area of the UK". County lines' drug runners 'as young as 11' Train patrols target drug dealers '100 county lines drug networks in Wales' Ms Holland called on professionals working with people at risk of being involved in county line operations to assist, saying: "It's the nurses, teachers, social workers, GPs, and anyone who works with young or vulnerable people, that can really help to make a difference." Last week three drug dealers from London and Kent who used vulnerable teenagers to traffic crack cocaine and heroin to Portsmouth were jailed in a "landmark case". They are believed to have been the first to have been charged with modern slavery offences. Other recent cases before the courts include two brothers from Birmingham who ran a network supplying heroin and crack cocaine in Hereford, while a police operation on 1 May resulted in 24 arrests and raids in Newcastle, Stevenage, Norwich, Glasgow and London. Iryna Pona, policy manager at the Children's Society, said the charity had heard "shocking stories of children being groomed with money and drugs before the life of glamour they have been promised quickly descends into a nightmare". She said while it was good to see police are stepping up their fight against the gangs "too many children exploited through county lines are still... failing to get help from an independent advocate to ensure they are supported as victims". View the full article
  8. Yesterday
  9. skydiver

    Promotions as a PCSO

    No although you can move sideways into other PCSO roles depending on the force, or you can consider applying to be a PC.
  10. And RM the point I was making was in response to the CC's comments and I was saying that there are already loads of ways to avoid criminalising teenagers, so its not as if we need to find more ways to avoid criminalising them.
  11. No discipline, no respect and no fear of the justice system because they know it is loaded in their favour. We should never be making any apology for hauling some poor deluded juvenile criminal before the courts. I Believe that Lone Wolf got it spot on.
  12. Beaker

    Brexit Discussion

    I'm trying to feel sorry for the poor Neo-Nazis, but I can't seem to care they're covered in dairy product.
  13. Fedster

    Brexit Discussion

    Is throwing milkshakes at racist bigots a thing now? Tommy Robinson had a few thrown at him as well. Does this kind of activity actually give Farage more support because people might feel sorry for him?
  14. I was not being sarcastic. I was pointing out the other end of the argument/discussion. There’s plenty of condemnation about being soft on the 16/17 year olds with an offending history but every one of those started somewhere. What I was (maybe clumsily) putting across was, at which point should the CJS so ‘something’ about the offending by juveniles? We have had years of ideas. Borstal and the ‘short sharp shock’ didn’t work, now ideas to not criminalise young people is being condemned. You are right in that I have no convictions because I don’t know the answer. Somewhere between the 11 year old committing his first offence and that same person being 17 committing his 50th offence something has to be done. But what and when? Those are the things the CJS hasn’t sorted out in the last 100+ years so what chance have I got?
  15. SL1710

    Initial interview

    Thanks very much.
  16. So, why is DICK not show casing the reality that a considerable amount of police resource is being spent on complex investigations- of which, female applicants might be better applicants to become direct entry Detectives than men? Please frame my comments above within how I posed a question. Nonetheless, we don’t need the Commissioner blaming terrorist attacks for putting off female applicants. Rather, we need to encourage suitable applicants into the ‘direct detective’ who are out off by the machoness.
  17. ParochialYokal

    Joining the CNC police

    The CNC are a specialist police force- they are security police, as opposed to territorial police. It must be an amazing experience for a probationer to become a specialist AFO straight out of training but, likewise, if you have a ‘thief taker’ mentality then you would have made a pee poor choice in joining a force where you are unlikely to EVER make any arrest. Quiet literally, you are unlikely to ever make an arrest during your entire police query. As a Special, my ‘maximum score’ was three separate arrests in 6 hours. I am sure that such a role would be a great job for an ex military type, but I struggle to understand why anyone who aspires to be a ‘proper copper’ would apply for such a role? I think that you asked the wrong question. Rather, you need to consider how you can reapply to Police Scotland in order to be successful, as opposed to pigeon whole yourself into a role within the CNC. Whilst they do good work and should be respected, they are not a ‘plan B’ or a ‘runner up prize’. You must really want to join them because you understand their role and what they do. They really won’t want you because you wasn’t good enough to get into Police Scotland. Take the hint from Police Scotland and reapply with a more robust approach.
  18. A-91

    Joining the CNC police

    My advice to you is do not use CNC as a fall back option as you were unsuccessful for Police Scotland. If your heart is in conventional policing persevere with PS and reapply.
  19. Mac7

    Plain Clothes Operations

    You don’t need a RIPA authority to conduct plain clothes patrols. Are you sure the look over the glasses was not in relation to the nature of operation and not the dress code for the op?
  20. Funkywingnut

    Plain Clothes Operations

    Yeah pretty much, the surveillance has to be targeted or directed at a subject(s). Style of dress certainly isn’t mentioned in RIPA.
  21. Sierra Lima

    L2 Training, The do's and do not's

    November is a good time as it's not to warm. Practice putting your kit on beforehand. Drink plenty of water. Enjoy it, it's good fun. It's not difficult, it gets hot and sweaty but otherwise you just need to listen and do as you're told. Only 2 days?
  22. Strathy-SC

    Initial interview

    Don’t be nervous, use the water to give you time to think, don’t go in with prepared answers, get talking to other candidates waiting for their interview. Make sure your job knowledge is up to a get standard. They might try and push your buttons, it’s a test don’t fall for it and good luck!
  23. Whilst it is a great book, I am still somewhat haunted by the content. I will never get the following anecdote out of my mind’s eye: The case of the drunk 18 year old lad that decided to descend from the top of a bus stop shelter by shimmying down a lamp post ‘Bat Man style’. Unfortunately, the lamp post was coated with a fiercely prickly anti-stick surface to deter affixing stickers and also graffiti. Apparently, gravity was not his friend and the momentum that he descended with culminated in his proud 18 year old manhood ended up as, to use the medical term: a ‘de-gloved penis’, that was apparently akin to a piece of ‘canned spaghetti’. Try putting ‘de-gloved penis’ into Google images and you will see my horror. Can you imagine someone making you read that without putting in a ‘health warning’ upfront? If someone is going to write such a thing, you would at least think that they would include a word of caution before others read it and also get exposed to the shocking image with no means to ever wipe the image from their head. Once you imagine it, the horror will never escape you... At least now I have shared that you with, you have received a ‘health warning’, so that you do not have to read this for yourself in the book. As an aside, the author is now a successful screenplay writer, which includes writing for Mrs Brown’s Boys.
  24. Why do you feel the need to make a grossly exaggerated and sarcastic response, is it because deep down you lack in your own convictions on the matter? Did you stop to think that the significant majority of 11 year olds don't commit crime, and do not go on to commit crime? The system works in as much that plenty of young people have a level of decency and respect for others in that they understand the difference between right and wrong, and subsequently demonstrate the responsibility to make the right choices. All criminals start somewhere... the hypothetical 11 year old found committing crime for the first time and held to account for their actions cannot be the result of a flawed criminal justice system if they've never been part of it, can they?
  25. Whether or not a young person is ‘criminalised’ is merely the outcome of a process. When young get cuffed and / or put in the back of a police car, the majority poop themselves. I also worked in Youth Offending and saw how many ‘hard’ young offenders were in tears when I used to go down to the cells to assess them after being sent down. I have also come across young people whom I said that I was going to take home and that they would have to explain what they did to their parents before I made a decision about how to proceed with them. Many begged me to get nicked- perhaps knowing that their parent(s) would immediately jump to their defence and claim that they were picked on. But when little Johnny made a confession in front of his parent(s) it was a very different encounter indeed. The same parent(s) whom would have claimed that little Johnny got treated unfairly then turned on me moaning that I didn’t arrest him. There is a level of nuance here. Bad acts need to be criminalised but one off incidents of making poor decisions that have a limited on communities shouldn’t be criminalised as a matter or course.
  26. Billy Blue Tac

    Plain Clothes Operations

    https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/742041/201800802_CSPI_code.pdf @Scottie_340 See section 2 on page 10. You may wish to give a copy to your colleague so s/he can learn a thing or two about how the law actually works
  27. Scottie_340

    Plain Clothes Operations

    This was my exact response but I got the look over the glasses and of pure anger.... My understanding is that you are able to patrol local areas and areas of crime in plain clothes as long as your not conducting surveillance on persons or property? I tried reading the full RIPA legislation however it could take me days....
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