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  1. Zulu 22

    Zulu 22

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/04/21 in all areas

  1. I do wish the national service calls would finally go away. No idea why stuffing our military with a bunch of reluctant criminal children is supposed to be good for anyone. Properly funded education and social care? Likely to have a far greater impact. Our care homes are stuffed with children who the state have entirely failed across the board. They are just waiting to become victims or offenders and no one seems remotely appalled.
    5 points
  2. As @BizzieBeesays, policing has been in disarray since long before 2010. I joined in the early 1980s when policing was in disarray, but not as in as much disarray as it was in the more corrupt days of the 1970s and 1960s. Here are some ‘rules’ about policing that I have learned - you won’t find these in books: everyone knows how to police better than the officer doing the policing; it was better 10/20/30 years ago - this applies in any era; people support the police until they are engaged with the police; what is happening to me at this time is the most important and u
    5 points
  3. As a former Army Non Commissioned Officer, I can assure you that there is no appetite whatsoever for national service from anyone currently serving. Trust me, it can be challenging enough to lead and motivate people who actually want to be there, when things are going wrong. Especially on operations, when you might be on one end of a two way shooting range. Now, imagine trying to lead a section or platoon full off individuals who don't want to be there. I will however concede that the Armed Forces do provide invaluable life experience, and qualifications for motivated individuals, wh
    4 points
  4. There is no time limit on the offence of Murder, and there should not be. Here we have extraordinary circumstances in an era when IRA terrorists hid behind women, children and anonimity to murder civilians and Servicemen. They saw any Military as easy prey for their murderous intent. In the Peace agreement the IRA were given immunity from Prosecution which was wrong but, if they were going to do that they should have made it for everyone. The murder in the incident was of an IRA hit man who was known to have committed 15 murders of military personnel. The man fled from a road block so wh
    3 points
  5. Dear me what a non-story. There are no niceties in the use of force. Move on, release BWV if needs be...Better still tell the impending complainant to better consider their life choices.
    3 points
  6. @Wilts20 + I think the problem of working in a “smart” uniform started in about 94 or 95 give or take when the first iteration of body armour/ black wick shirts came in, just prior to that i was wearing a white shirt, tie and N.A.T.O. Type pullover/black rain coat and that was pretty much it. I might have had that first heavy version of armour as well at that time as [the one that was easy to put on/off], i just cant recall. When i think back every one had a pride in keeping as smart as they reasonably could before the wick shirts and armour came in, afterwards i think they just gave up and
    3 points
  7. Very healthy, guys. I'm feeling a bit guilty for having a bacon sandwich and a coffee.😂
    3 points
  8. The life sentence makes a nice headline, but with a 4.5 year minimum term she'll be out before she's 40. I did like the bit in mitigation though "Mitigating, her defence counsel Balraj Bhatia QC said: "She is just a few days away from her 34th birthday...she is clearly a manipulative woman." At least they weren't trying to sugarcoat her! "She has lost her career...Nothing is worse than when a gift is given and then cruelly taken away, she has to live with that. " So nothing about how sorry she is for trying to ruin the career and life of the victim. The gift wasn't cruelly taken away, sh
    3 points
  9. Exactly. I'm personally not religious so have no ball in that court, I'm also not a member of the LGBT community so again have no ball in that court either (however I can see why someone from the LGBT community would feel passionately when an important aspect of their identity is criticised or questioned.) I do however believe adults should live their lives as adults in whatever way they wish without interference from the state or anyone else, I also believe religion has been both damaging and destructive (but acknowledging once upon a time a necessity and incredibly important to o
    3 points
  10. Local force near me had an LGBT event in the city crashed by a small group of Christians who decided to preach about God outside the local park where this day was taking place, saying similar things to what has been reportedly said by this preacher (inflammatory more than directed harassment.) The LGBT community made various demands that the group be arrested and dragged away by police but the inspector present who was a member of the LGBT community herself said "They have a right to be here as anyone else." They monitored the situation and made sure there was no breach of the peace.
    3 points
  11. Whether or not racism can operate in just about any direction isn't in dispute; I'm not sure what the connection isnto your claim that the 'Race card' is overplayed, but that seems to be immaterial to your first post. I don't see how you were making the point that the Police are damned if they do/don't. If anything I would say that you have damned them; the first question you're asking is if the two officers have abused their position, based purely on the colour of their skin. Your first statement is that IF the report is true (which you believe it is), then Free Speech is dead.
    3 points
  12. Strange that many of the Old Codgers I have ever had dealings swore blind that National Service was the making of them. It instilled discipline that they were short of and, they came out after two years with qualifications and a trade. There were also many who were given a purpose and signed on serving as regulars. The big draw back would be the complaints of bullying by the true wokes who would never like to be told what to do, and when and how to do it. I would think that many could look on it as similar to University but with discipline. Is it any surprise that so many of today's ge
    3 points
  13. He’s a silly boy! He must have been on someone’s radar? 🙄🤔 7 years is a fair enough sentence and I hope he uses the time constructively (excuse the pun!😁)
    3 points
  14. I'm of the mind now you just leave them to it. Local force near me did exactly this with a major 'kill the bill' protest despite their best attempts to have a reaction from police and they just got bored and left without incident. Cops again being sent in to an angry mob with flat caps throwing missiles however wasn't a smart move, so many alternatives out there including bump caps which would have provided better protection, whilst I'm not not a fan of them for routine patrol they are better than a peaked hat.
    3 points
  15. Perhaps the local police model you seem to favour is not a viable business option.
    3 points
  16. Fundamentally Chauvin has been tried by social media, arm chair police officers and BLM for a year. There was only ever one outcome going to happen here and to say he hasn’t or could ever expect a fair trial was an understatement. Especially when the leader of his country wades in with comments about the right outcome before a jury has given a verdict. There’s very few people who will sit on a jury who would have been in the situation Chauvin and his colleagues found themselves in. His actions were poor policing of the worst kind and he should have known better of that there is no doubt.
    3 points
  17. I think we should all carry swords more often
    3 points
  18. I've said it before, and I'll say it again. It's not "executes", it's "murders". The officer was murdered, plain and simple. I don't know why some news outlets want to dress it up as something different. RIP.
    3 points
  19. I feel like this is yet another fancy 'plaster' on the gaping wound that is UK policing. The real need for reform lies within the political sphere and the Executive and Judiciary. You simply cannot keep making front line policing the first respondent for all social ills AND make prosecuting and investigating crime even harder and more cumbersome and then expect people to gladly sign onto and remain in a dangerous, stressful, thankless and ultimately unfulfilling occupation.
    3 points
  20. I thought of something the other day! What about a general 'current affairs/general discussion' area - so it does not have to be particularly a news story, but maybe just general chit-chat about 'a' or 'b'. E.g. MrSmith wants to talk about something that does not fall into the category of a specific news story, but is not general policing discussion either. Foreign news? as well as current Foreign Policing News. E.g. US politics, Russia, China etc, but not policing so cannot go in the FPN part. Just some thoughts.
    3 points
  21. I’m not sure why the Good Friday Agreement doesn’t work both ways: I.e. forgiving the offences of both sides. That said, there is an argument for the state to be held to a higher standard: as the state is bound by Human Rights considerations. Perhaps the answer lies in a kind of “Truth and Reconciliation Commission” where matters are investigated thoroughly by a judge-lead inquiry, and verdicts are returned, without individuals actually facing imprisonment etc.
    2 points
  22. 2 points
  23. It makes a bigger story than ‘police officer working on protest demonstrations has face slashed and is almost blinded and scarred for life’ ......doesn’t it? Never let the truth get in the way of a good story, especially if it sells eh?
    2 points
  24. Despite the fact that crowds are currently banned I would imagine that they will still fall foul of the football public order legislation: going into the playing area, throwing missiles into the playing area, possession of alcohol at a designated sporting event, having a flare or a firework at a designated event. That is in addition to the assaults and public order offences outside the ground. There will be a few early morning alarm calls in the next week or so followed by court appearances and banning orders.
    2 points
  25. 99% of what you've written is wrong or nonesense. You're simply regergitating things from bias intrrnet sources which fall apart with little challenge. Take the recording of items siezed. The process is EXACTLY THE SAME whether a warrant is used or not. "but none to search a phone." The warrant is to seize the phone, you get the contents by default. By your logic if I seize safe, I need another warrant to search inside it. Rather than using YouTube try actually reading PACE.
    2 points
  26. The public do trust the police, loll after poll says so. As for changes, what would you like to see change? Barring in mind you shown repeatedly that you've no idea what we actually do.
    2 points
  27. I agree with both the sentence passed and the sentencing precedent for future convicted defendants in very similar cases. Looks like she would have been convicted of perverting the course of justice which carries a maximum sentence of life imprisonment.
    2 points
  28. I saw this coming since about June last year. The updates coming out of FHQ didn't actually quote the relevant legislation so I ended up trying to read it myself (which took some effort as the parliament site had numerous edits and revisions) anyhow on reading the actual legislation I remember thinking it wasn't workable and was just poorly designed (effectively it was written in such a way that anyone could literally excuse themselves from it.) I made a decision there and then to be more 'Educate and explain' rather than 'enforcement' as some cops got suckered into... I've sai
    2 points
  29. Some people on here are disregarding the safety of others, apparently because they do not believe in complying with the set rules. This was a deadly Pandemic which could be spread easily. Sad there were some who do not believe in the medical science or safety advice. I wonder how many people they have helped to infect. I know victims who have died when the only place they had been was to shop for essential shopping. Those who received fines deserve to be named and shamed so that their own community and neighbours can see how irresponsible they are. Ther are people who have volunteered in
    2 points
  30. Are you from the Victorian era?
    2 points
  31. Good to see the MPs supporting the Police enforcing a law parliament they put in place......oh wait..
    2 points
  32. Its a tricky topic and agree that it should apply across the board. However, if we did that a significant proportion of the police service would become ex-officers when you look at how many officers are married or in significant relationships with other officers (not even exploring the wider police family). And as you right say, if it takes two to tango, then surely both parties are naughty unless it could be shown that it was only being done under duress. I'm not so high and mighty as to see the police service setting boundaries and moral decisions on how those who are married beha
    2 points
  33. You may be surprised but possibly the least likely people to keep secrets secret .... will be police. Almost all these WhatsApp type disciplines came to notice when one of the secreteers shared the secret messages outside the secret group. Nothing to do with privacy more to do with stupidity IMHO
    2 points
  34. The last thing that anyone would need would be for "Little Hitler's" employed by the Council and jokingly called Constables. There are so many reports of Council "Jobsworth's" who seem incapable of exercising any form of Common Sense. It would just mean a different uniform for the Council enforcement officers. Parks and such are public places and, as such, should be Policed but by the H.O. Forces in whose are they are. You quote other Police Forces. This is not meant as any insult but you would just have to scrutinise the BTP. They do many good things because they have unique legisla
    2 points
  35. I remember the targets and they were great. You had to get X number of detections a month or trouble. So every dnd was a S5 poa and people called up for every shoplifting. Not for domestics or missing people, welfare checks on an elderly person. No detections there. Then crime was massively up. So then every S5 poa became a dnd. The great wheel rolls on.
    2 points
  36. No, what I'm suggesting is a classic model return where the "Office of Constable" is used more broadly for specialist fields or pieces of specific legislation. A Constable is NOT and has never been solely a "Police Officer." In the case of councils/local authorities they should have the ability to effectively enforce low level byelaws/nuisance legislation - which already exists, the current legislation however limits that appointment to Parks/Open Spaces... I'm stating that limit to open spaces/parks should be removed and low level nuisance, byelaws etc that exist outside of that w
    2 points
  37. This is the full, unblurred video. Listen to the guy at 05:00 saying the cop 'just got out and shot her!". He is the reason I do not trust people when they make complaints against the Police. He is flat out consciously lying. Can you imagine if the officer didn't have his BWC and this guy gave a statement? He'd be charged for 1st degree murder and in a cell. I remember a few years back watching a Cops-style show where they showed a fatal Police-involved shooting from the late 90s-early '00s. A white cop, pulled up to a call regarding a black male causing a public nuisance. As so
    2 points
  38. If she hasn't already been 'spoken to' by BLM and told that she 'll get lynched if she expresses any support or thanks for him.
    2 points
  39. I agree. It’s certainly a momentary lapse in professional behaviour. Nobody was hurt, no offences were disclosed. Apology accepted and move on 👍
    2 points
  40. Growing up poor is just an easy way to excuse the bad behaviour of some people and suggests that it's understandable how people turn to crime. I grew up on benefits and didn't have all the fancy things i wanted and couldn't afford to do very much. What i used to do was play football and ride my bike, the sort of thing most people, even those who are poor could do. We have free schools and free healthcare. The benefits system isn't perfect, but you could give everyone £30k per year and there would still be the same crimes being committed.
    2 points
  41. That’s a concept I’ve listened to for decades. ‘One rule for them and another for the rest of us’ doesn’t mean that you should become lawless and a law breaker because a prominent politician wasn’t whipped at the post. Woolly Liberals and activists still need to live by the laws of the land, otherwise if the majority of us felt the same way anarchy would overtake and society would ultimately consist of more feral, lawless and monstrous beings preying on the weak. Who would society have to properly protect the individual then? I digressed. We need law and order and more law-abiding citizens to
    2 points
  42. In my area we have two universities and the vast majority of the student population have been excellent. However, around 20% of the ones in student halls and rented accommodation have been partying like there’s no tomorrow with no thought for themselves, their fellow students, neighbours or staff. They have shown contempt for authority and disregard distancing even when police turn up! Policing them is very difficult and downright dangerous in some cases. If they are the future of our country, please God save us all!
    2 points
  43. Different country, but here goes... We have not enforced our (similar - masks, social distancing, capacity etc.) COVID restrictions in any meaningful way, beyond providing occasional muscle for our provincial health teams. Our management, from what I can gather, have been very reluctant to put their officers at risk enforcing regulations. I suspect they looked at the legislation (rushed, complicated and basically unenforceable, just like the UK) and thought, 'No way are we having anything to do with that.' Broadly speaking, the police officers themselves have been very reluctant
    2 points
  44. And you thought the best way to resolve the situation was via an Internet forum?
    2 points
  45. Years ago referrals were made only to HMIC for allegations of a most serious nature. Each force has a sizeable PSD now and as such should investigate their own or each other’s minor infractions. Chief Constables should be thinking of the individuals in these cases, not just theirs or the force’s reputation. Repeating myself again, I put down to my age, but I do say with some regularity that there’s too much outside interference from politicians national and local in policing these days. I believe it’s this interference that drives these decisions to ‘refer’. Chief Constables and Commissioner
    2 points
  46. It is so sad to hear of the death of HR.H. Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4074042/Prince-Philip-dies.html
    2 points
  47. Level 5.4 on a 15m bleep test is a woefully low standard. It should be much higher. I was required to achieve level 7.6 as an AFO, even this level is perfectly achievable with training for most people. Fitness was something my former force did get right. Towards the end of my service, officers were encouraged not just to pass, but to continue to their best effort. I'm certainly not an athlete but as a reasonably fit male in my mid forties (at the time) I was running up to around level 9.2, and that's with shin splints and knees that are in bits. Surely if I can do that, then most others
    2 points
  48. I see a fundamental problem with the whole idea. Officers resign to escape the role. I can't see many retired or resigned officers actually wanting to come back and do the job on a paid part time basis. The small extra income, even with a tax free annual bounty, simply isn't worth it for the grief and potential of being thrown under the proverbial bus when it all goes wrong. It would surely be better to address the root causes of why officers are leaving in droves: weak and infective leadership, dangerously low numbers of officers, an indifferent judiciary, and the decimation of other pub
    2 points
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