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  1. From the video the ‘stamp’ on the back was a push with the foot to make him lie face down so he could be controlled. Picking up the key facts from the story - police called to a man acting in an anti social way. Engage and he is drunk and becomes aggressive. He pulls off the BWV camera of one officer and throws it on the ground. When arrested becomes violent. Officers back off and PAVA spray him. He moves towards one of the officers and is told to ‘stay down’. He doesn’t and is tasered. Looks like he’s trying to get up so gets pushed into his front, handcuffed and taken away. Now in custody for assault on police and criminal damage. Actual headline: BRAVE POLICE OFFICERS GET ASSAULTED PROTECTING THE PUBLIC FROM DRUNK AND AGGRESSIVE MAN. Do you think the Daily Fail would give me a job as a headline writer for their stories?
    5 points
  2. Yes. The parents couldn’t/wouldn’t control her, you couldn’t/wouldn’t control her. Bring on someone who did the job. If you’re not happy with how the police dealt with it then don’t call the police next time. Solve you’re own problem.
    5 points
  3. We have already answered this question. I feel like you are now fishing for a specific answer. I'm going to place this topic at risk of closure given the repeated questions and the fact it's a very strange topic.
    5 points
  4. ^ so you were there, the parents were there also - and yet you all abrogated your responsibility towards the child, left it up to the police officer to deal with it, and now you're looking to stir the pot because you disagree with how it was dealt with? I would suggest that something doesn't add up here; and that you are either telling us either only some of the truth; or maybe none of the truth at all.
    4 points
  5. I'm currently tutoring, all I'll say is out of the box thinking for progressing enquiries isnt being taught to young officers nor do I think the trait/quality is being looked for in recruitment, it's almost as if by design we're employing people who will just mindlessly fill forms in and do as directed. One thing I'll agree with @Zulu 22 +on is that crimes have become very much a tick box exercise of clearing queues alongside a checklist of basic enquiries, if all of those marks are hit the crime will be sent off for closure, that's if the crime even makes it to bobbies workload without being screened out before hand and killed at source. An asssult job a cop was looking into, basics done such as CCTV downloaded with half decent stills of a suspect, ID Sought sent out with consideration made for a media appeal, still no name. I make the suggestion to the budding cop that next early turn we do some enquiries within the locality to try and ID the suspect, the response: "Is that something we REALLY need to do?" Cue a stern talk/lecture on flesh and blood victims being a priority alongside going beyond what is obvious to secure justice for a victim of crime. I've found myself getting disheartened of late, has to be said.
    3 points
  6. 1. It all depends on the person and their individual coping mechanisms. I have been to many deaths; varying from high speed train impacts, motorway fatals, elderly, young, suicide both violent and non. You name it. Most of the time you can brush it off. It can and will become “the norm” and it just becomes one of those things you just crack on and do. However, there are always some incidents where you can crack (like I did after witnessing a train suicide at 100+mph). In this particular incident I took part in TRIM which I found helpful and sought comfort in friends and family. This was 6 years ago and I still think about it most weeks. Only you will know how you react after you’ve been there and done it a few times and don’t be surprised if you react either way. Nor should you be disturbed or concerned if you have a reaction you weren’t expecting. It IS an abnormal thing you are going to be doing, so it will take your mind a little bit to adjust to that. I will echo the comments of ensuring you speak to someone whether that be your tutor, friend, family or whomever should you require and don’t bottle it up. 2. I don’t know what BTP is like for officer safety but personally, I didn’t find my district training helpful for real world situations. The techniques taught were appalling. I’ve never found myself in a situation where I’ve wanted to put someone in a ‘thumb lock’ when they’re trying to seriously injure me. Now being in a specialist role, I find the training much more relevant and suited to reality. My recommendation to you would be to learn the NDM inside and out. And I don’t just mean what each of the points are, I mean really look into it and you’ll find it to be your bible when it comes to deciding whether to use force and what level of force is justified. You can find a good guide on the police firearms APP on the College of policing website. Once you’re operational as a PC you’ll be able to access the full version from a work computer. Supplementary to this, learn your use of force powers. You’ll no doubt have this explained in training school. I emphasise the NDM and UOF powers because I have seen officers get assaulted because they have been afraid to take control of a subject either through lack of knowledge of their powers or through fear of getting a complaint. The latter I am finding is very common at the moment and I am not sure why. The kit for area officers is spread between taser and non taser, more area officers are getting equipped with taser which is a start but it is not the magic tool that solves everything. Others have rightly stated, effective communication is your friend. 3. Work life balance was hard for me sometimes, particularly when I found myself with a high workload. I would be tempted to do work on days off to catch up or I would worry about how you crimes were doing. That can be natural for newer officers. You’ve stated you like curry and war films which is a good start. Having things to do on your days off is essential. It took me far longer than it should have to realise this. Identify something you enjoy doing. I’ve recently taken up target shooting and of all things… gardening. Little things outside of work to look forward to can help keep things in check! Generally though I don’t think the work-life balance in area is too horrendous so long as you don’t drown yourself in work! I hope this didn’t come across too dampening, I just want you to have an honest insight. There are many great aspects to the police which I am sure you will experience over your career. I am more than happy to answer any other questions you might have - hopefully some where I can put a good spin on it! One thing is for certain. You’ll make some great friends and have some moments unlike any other in the world.
    3 points
  7. The context was criticising the use of CS gas and suggesting strikes to final target areas were preferable, an attitude towards violence which if you mentioned at an assessment centre would quite probably not see you employed. I only mention it to temper your zeal here with some objectivity, as I don't see how one can form such a fixed opinion without sight of the offending meme. I've never arrested anyone for a tasteless joke on any medium, and I'd be amongst the swiftest to file tenuous complaints using the high tests imposed by R v O'Neill (2016) or the CPS' own guidance on communications offence summarised here from paragraph 26 onwards. The criminal law does not exist to police the morality of humour nor to be used as a weapon in private disputes. Of course the rights to a private life, to freedom of expression and the integrity of one's correspondence are all qualified, but on the current state of the law only insofar as the conduct is so abhorrent as to call into question the ability to discharge one's duties effectively. "Abhorrent" is a very strong word and qualified yet further by the connection to the duties of the office; it does not mean off-colour jokes nor even necessarily ones which some people may find offensive. While you'd be very foolish to be in the Met making public jokes about the subject in hand in the present circumstances, I am not sure the right balance is necessarily being struck in the rush to take scalps.
    2 points
  8. IMHO, anything done by any local authority that involves enforcement is based less on local safety and more on creating revenue, regardless of the fluffy words around it. Bet their training will be less about being “eyes and ears” but more “pens and tickets”. as a quick and current example, one of the N London boroughs in the news about using ANPR to enforce low traffic zone, budgeting that drivers will ignore or miss the miss the signs rather than being compliant.
    2 points
  9. Ultimately they'll encounter the same issues every other non-warranted form of 'law enforcement' (**cringe**) role has encountered in Britain over the years, be it PCSOs, litter wardens, traffic wardens, enforcement officers etc if they have no bite behind what they're trying to get done, what is the point when they encounter a person that ultimately will need dealing with but will just elect to either ignore them or abuse them? They'll limply state "We'll call the police" the Met may well get to them at some point in the next week or so, meanwhile the offender is laughing themselves silly as they walk away. What's the point? Rinse and repeat ad infinitum. I mean look at the uniform this lot are wearing... A jumbled mix of corproate nightmare, public relations ambassador and parking attendant, who designed them? It'll be someone in a back office who doesn't have to wear it. Does it instill any sense of importance, confidence or presence in the officer? Does it look smart? In my opinion no, not when you compare it to the old H&F Parks Constabulary uniform. My opinion is well known, I believe in the concept of local authority controlled constables to replace lower tiered wardens, PCSOs and the like to help bridge the gap between the modern county police forces swamped dealing with safe guarding, domestics and serious crime to ever look into these more community low level orientated issues is the best means forward from an operational point of view and value for money. I believe in both the public and political mindset however there is so much confusion surrounding the terms "office of constable" and what we know in modern to be "police" to ever separate the two from one another, people will always see constables as police and bar some extremely rare surviving historical examples it will be difficult to change minds. As for remaining Parks Police you only have: Wandsworth (active) Hampstead Heath (active) Havering (seemingly inactive) Kensington & Chelsea (active) Kew Constabulary (Ceremonial) Epping Forest Keepers (active but limited in scope.)
    2 points
  10. How would that be a mistake? It's either a wilful act or so grossly ignorant of a nationally important policing event that they are scarcely fit to be on duty. It's not a whoops situation.
    2 points
  11. This ^^^ Ex coppers spouting off generally range from embarrassing through irritating to annoying. Especially those ‘experts’ who get rolled out by the BBC or GMB and the like to talk about the latest ‘crisis’ in policing. There were two retired officers from my old force who regularly had letters or articles published in the local papers. A pair of lazy coppers with no respect from their colleagues. One became a local councillor - for one term. ‘It wasn’t like it in my day’ and ‘I was soooo much better than these modern officers’ type musings.
    2 points
  12. As long as the officer is put on the 'excluded list' so they can't rejoin elsewhere, then not revealing the name seems a fair balance. After all, how many companies name employees who have been subject to internal discipline?
    2 points
  13. Always said PCSO are a waste of time with no real power . to me it is a cheap way of putting the numbers up , time to put real officers back on the beat and scrap PCSOs .
    2 points
  14. Its not the PCSOs fault its the f wit who assaulted him as well as the a holes who filmed it and others who stood around and watched!
    2 points
  15. As a concept, not sure how PP could influence the globally accessible internet to the extent suggested. As tragic as they are, as others have said, 2MPs deaths in X years warrants radical fast paced response, yet the other more prolific ones continue with barely a mention.
    2 points
  16. If that’s not another example why PCSOs should be no longer a thing, I don’t know what is. That poor PCSO is failed by the system, inadequately trained, inadequately kitted and put at risk unnecessarily.
    2 points
  17. So anonymous users should not be allowed on social media according to Patel, so where do we draw the line? Forums are arguably social media should we now ban anonymous accounts on forums? Are those on this thread who agree with Patel happy to user there real names on forums like this? After all only " criminals and cowards hide behind anonymity"
    2 points
  18. I personally would never post something online that I wouldn't be prepared to shout loudly in a crowded room. There definitely should be some scope for exposing those who post abuse towards others online.
    2 points
  19. 2 points
  20. I’ve always work RAF parade shoes, both operationally and for the likes of court. Cheap, relatively durable, and smart.
    2 points
  21. Often, you get what you pay for. I have a pair of these from Shoe Zone for general office duties, they're comfortable enough but it's a bit of a false economy TBH as the plastic soles tend to spilt if I do a lot of walking in them: https://www.shoezone.com/Products/George-Oliver-Mens-Black-Leather-Lace-Up-Shoe-53138 I also have colleagues who swear by Doctor Marten's shoes as good all-rounders, but at a price: https://www.drmartens.com/uk/en_gb/mens/mens-black-boots-shoes/c/02092000?product_style=shoes But whatever you choose, make sure they're Oxford's not brogues http://bertoinbrogues.com/oxfords-not-brogues-words-to-live-by/
    2 points
  22. There are some people who can’t see past a prison sentence. Same with politicians, who have the ‘excuse’ of seeking the populist vote. I’d rather someone who had done something abhorrent and potentially posed a risk was sanctioned to something that would reduce the risk s/he poses as much as possible in the future. Others see anything that doesn’t include locking someone up as a soft option. For me if the choice is prison for x years and then more victims, or treatment, monitoring, ban from contact with potential victims, restriction in what work can be done and no more victims then I know what I’d prefer. Standing by for the confused emoji.
    2 points
  23. You're a few years behind the curve. No, I won't explain further, try Google.
    2 points
  24. Rank: Inspector Length of Service 13 Years Role Duty Officer Shift 0700-1600 hours I've not written one of these for years. In part, this is because between 2015 and 2020 I worked in a unit where most of the work was relatively secretive and not suitable for writing up. However, I have since moved back out into uniformed policing and have gone up two ranks to Inspector. I am now a "Duty Officer" in an inner-city location. Essentially, I am the officer responsible for a whole shift of constables and sergeants, the most senior person on duty who takes charge of an incident in its initial stages and ensures everything is done properly. I am also responsible for lots of other things: complaints, reviewing serious threats to life, hate crimes, and the HR needs and development of 50-odd officers. I also try and spend as much time as possible out on patrol and turn up to incidents to support officers and pitch in as and when I can. (I surprised an officer who was guesting on my team recently when I was first on scene at an incident and took all the statements and arrested the suspect.... I'm still a copper, just about!). I felt it would be interesting to cover the sorts of things a Duty Officer does; most accounts on this website often seem to be of those young in service and I've not seen much input from officers who have supervisory responsibilities. It may serve to give some people an insight into what promotion may involve - there are many specialisms in the police, and I see leadership as a distinct specialism in itself. That said, I have the greatest respect for those who spend their whole careers at constable or sergeant rank: these are the backbone of the service, and the most specialised officers, experts in their fields, are those who have spent their careers dedicated to investigating the most serious crimes, using the most specialist kit, or being up-to-date in respect of the latest developments in policy, procedure, or technology. As a leader I can't know as much as the officers under me - I don't do case files every day, nor do I arrest people as often as I would like. My job is to ensure that my officers can do their job as best as possible, and to underwrite the risks that they take on. So what does a "typical shift" look like. Well, as any uniformed police officer would tell you, there is no such thing. What follows is an account of a real shift that took place a couple of months ago. It is not embellished in any way. I arrived at the station at about 0620 hours, got changed, and was in the supervisors' office about 10 minutes later. I always arrive on duty early, this is so I am not in a rush, can take the handover from the earlier shift - letting the previous shift's inspector go off duty, have a cup of tea, check my emails, and generally not be in a rush. I walk in and have a chat with the night duty inspector. I find out what has gone on during the night, and what is on my place this morning. Today, there are a couple of complaints against police that need looking at: people who are not happy. I need to research the basic circumstances of the complaint and establish what needs doing. Sometimes just explaining police policy and powers, or getting an update for a victim will suffice. Sometimes the complaint needs to be formally recorded and sent to the Professional Standards Department. Communication skills, knowledge of law and policy, and a good ear are key to dealing with these effectively. I will ring the complainants at a more sociable hour - time allowing. Apart from that, not much has happened in the past 24 hours that is still ongoing and that requires me to take any action. After a bit of small-talk with the outgoing inspector he leaves to go home to bed. I turn to the sergeants, who are having their own handover with the night-duty sergeants, and ask them what the numbers look like today: it is a sad fact of modern policing that we often seem to be under strength all too often. There are often abstractions due to events, protests, training, court, sickness, and leave (if they can get it!), but today doesn't seem to bad. I have three sergeants on duty today (out of five) and that is pretty much my minimum strength for supervisors. They are a very capable bunch, and I consider myself luck that I can rely on such a well-gelled bunch of great skippers. If I didn't have them I couldn't run my team. After a bit of small talk we head over to do the morning briefing with the team. It is 0655 hours. The duty-sergeant for the day always leads the briefing, they give the PCs the postings for the day and gives any particular taskings out. I will give any updates that I need to give and try and say something inspirational, funny, (I fear I come across like someone making "dad jokes" in the main, or mention something that happened on a previous shift - which is often something more serious). Today, literally as we were walking away from the briefing and officers are inspecting their cars the radio crackles to life: "The ambulance service has been called to a baby in cardiac arrest at Flat B, 43 Birch Street. Unit for immediate attendance please" It is 0703 hours. I don't have to say anything. Already, officers are diving into cars and telling the control room that they will run. I run back to the Supervisors office: "Are you going guv?" "Absolutely. Have you got the car keys?" The sergeant and I jump into our car and race to the scene. What is going through my mind? So much.... Have we got paramedics running? Who is at the scene? Is this purely a medical situation or has a crime been committed? How will the officers deal with this? What does the policy say? I can't imagine a more horrendous call. Briefly I think about my own baby daughter and feel emotion rising. I push that thought to one side as quickly as it arises, I can't go down that path now. As we race to the scene there are sporadic updates: the mother is hysterical and has said "I smothered her". I'm the second police unit on scene. A paramedic has also arrived. I activate my body worn camera and run into the house. Officers are doing CPR on the tiny body of a two month old child in an upstairs bedroom. A paramedic is setting up their equipment. The mother is hysterically screaming: "I killed her, She's dead, she's dead!" She is, running around and getting in the way of those doing their best to save the baby. I feel that whatever I do it will be the wrong thing. I grab her and pull her into another room: "let them do their job. The best chance she has is for them to do their job". I try and get mum's name and baby's name. For a minute or two I try say woefully inadequate platitudes as I block mum from he baby. I'm conscious of more paramedics arriving, and I call up on the radio that I need more police officers. Not because I want to be relieved from dealing with the mother, but because I know that I need to coordinate the response to this incident. Even as I'm grappling with mum, I'm wondering if this is a crime - even if it is not, I will need to secure the scene, I am thinking about getting the officers doing CPR rotated out, I need to get the Ops Room to be doing intelligence checks. It feels like an hour, but it is probably only 2 or 3 minutes before the next police car arrives and I thrust a PC into the room to deal with mum. At that point I walk out of the address and sit in the car. This often makes me feel guilty. My instinct is to be in the thick of it and be dealing directly with those involved. However, that is not my job. My job is to coordinate the response. To this I need to understand what everyone is doing, what needs doing, and get those tasks completed. A sergeant is in the house coordinating the actions there, I am one step back and calling up to get intelligence checks done, I am speaking to the ambulance service incident commander about the information that they have, ensuring I have sufficient officers on scene, and so on. The baby is pronounced dead. So many questions arise: intelligence suggests that there was a child protection plan in place, there was a comment about smothering the baby on the call, where are the other children? I have to ensure the correct tone is set - on the one hand this is a terrible tragedy and we have to deal with the matter sensitively. On the other, this could be a crime scene. I try to establish as much information as possible. I coordinate numerous tasks and brief the CID. I am also concerned about my officers. As soon as first aid has finished I call out those that were directly involved: two PCs come out looking shell shocked. As they walk out one breaks down in tears and I sit them both in a police car outside. What can I say? "It's the worst thing you can deal with as a copper. It's ok to cry" and rather uselessly place my hand on her shoulder. I arrived with one sergeant, and I task one of the remaining two to take accompany the officers directly involved to a short debrief with the ambulance service; I ask her to offer the officers involved in the CPR to go home (getting them a lift home) if they so wish. One clearly can't continue working, a short time later they get taken home, the other wants to roll onto the next call - I make sure he goes out three-up in a car, so has some space and capacity to "tap out" should he need to. Mum and baby go to hospital (not the mortuary), I remain at the scene. The next hour or so is something of a numb blur as I make phone call, take notes, brief senior officers, and speak to colleagues. But by about half past nine I'm ready to leave the scene, intending to head back to the station to do paperwork. However, it wasn't to be: literally as I'm getting back into the car the radio crackles to life again - "there is a man standing on the wrong side of the railings nine stories up in a block of flats". A police car races to the scene and within a couple of minutes the officer, with a sound of slight panic in her voice, confirms that a man is standing in such a precarious position. She asks for a negotiator. The control room state that only the duty inspector can call a negotiator. The attending officer is one of my most experienced officers and who is the epitome of calm and professionalism. However, I can hear a hint of panic in her voice. "Control, if PC 4312 need a negotiator, she needs a negotiator. On my authority, please call one". I'm already racing to the scene. Ten minutes later I arrive at the base of a large urban tower block. I look up and I can see a man hanging off the edge nine stories up. He looks like he is ready to jump any second. A couple of other police cars have arrived and I instruct them to put cordons around the block. I am with a sergeant in my car, so I instruct them to coordinate the cordons. I head up to the ninth floor. I am conscious of too much chatter on the main radio channel. I don't want to spook the man with comments on the radio, so I get the channels "split" so we are on a spare channel and instruct all officers to turn their radios down. As I arrive on the floor I come across two PCs trying to speak to the man from about ten metres away. I stand out of sight in the stairwell and get a PC to come back to give me a briefing. Can we grab him? No, he could jump long before we got to him, does he want anything? No, he isn't saying anything meaningful? What do we know about him? What could we use to emotionally appeal to him? Not much.... It is a really hard situation to be in. How do we persuade him to come back over? I try and formulate a plan in my stairwell, but my options are limited. I request for the ambulance to be on standby, and request that the fire brigade attend with their rescue equipment. However, it soon becomes apparent that the help that either of them could offer was limited. After about an hour the negotiators arrive. In the meantime I have been hiding just around the corner listening to my officers attempting to get through to the man. I have also ensured officers have cordoned off the building and are ushering away any residents that come out. In a busy inner-city borough this is really no mean feat. Some of the officers from the previous call had rolled straight onto this call. Thankfully, most haven't. I brief the negotiators - interestingly, the decision to deploy them, and how to deploy them, is mine. They are a tactical option. I take their advice - obviously - but it is up to me how they are used. There have been other incidents when I have withdrawn them and resort to other tactics. As the Duty Officer, the buck stops with me. In this instance, there is very little that I can do apart from use negotiators. I don't have the time or space here to divulge the blow-by-blow account of how the negotiators engaged with the man, or the numerous considerations I made, however, the incident continued for another four hours. The initial PCs that attended, and I, remained behind the man - on the balcony and in the stairwell just behind - throughout. Thankfully, he eventually decided to come back over the balcony, the incident was resolved successfully and he was detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983. Obviously, once he came back over there were various other administrative things to do before I left the scene - I am virtually always last to leave. As it should be. I got back to the police station at about 4pm. Suddenly it hit me, that I had not eaten or drunk since I had woken up that morning. I was exhausted and faint. One of the late-turn sergeants was going out for food and I gratefully put in an order with him. I spent an hour and a half writing briefing notes and ensuring all the paperwork was done, before I eventually left for work. Before I left I spoke to my counterpart inspector at a neighbouring station. I agreed with him that for the first two hours of the next shift he would cover any calls on my section. The following day, I told all officers involved in the incident with the baby to remain behind after parade. They needed a debrief. I took their breakfast order and went to McDonalds and bought them each a breakfast, took it back to the nick, and we sat down for an hour just going through what happened. The point I repeatedly made to them, and I make regularly to whoever will listen frankly, is that the amount of trauma we are exposed to as police officer just isn't normal. What a normal person may experience in a lifetime we will experience in a year or even a month. It is ok to be affected by this and help is available - be that informally, having a laugh with your colleagues or a beer with your mates, but also more formally through counselling or health referrals. We talk through what we all did and why (one officer who just arrived had a dead baby just thrust into their arms unexpectedly, others did CPR, others dealt with family). We discuss how we felt. I think it's a healthy thing to do: it is important to take a break from the radio - even for an hour - to just take stock. The officer who had to go home is in a worse state and had gone sick: I ensure that a proper package of support is put in place and I keep in contact with her. I then move straight into debriefing the officers involved in the second incident. The first officers on scene got a glowing email from the head negotiator, but, again, I am more concerned with whether they are OK. They seem alright, and are reassured that the incident ended well and the negotiators were happy with their efforts. I put them up for a commendation and the superintendent soon calls them in for an award. ............and that's it. Just one day. A horrendous day, no doubt, but I've got a couple of dozen similar stories form the past year to recount. Thankfully we don't normally have more than one of these on a single shift. But, one thing is for certain - when it comes to trauma, what we police officers deal with, certainly in the quantity we do, isn't normal. To understand this is key, and it there is nothing shameful about seeking help if you need it. As I came out of the debrief one of the probationers came up to me and said: "Can I ask, are you OK sir? It's just I don't imagine anyone thinks to ask you." Look after each other.
    2 points
  25. Surely that's subjective? You might not feel threatened by it but a woman who lives near where Sarah Everard did might feel more scared of the police after reading another officer was joking about doing what Couzens did.
    1 point
  26. I'm uncomfortable with this recent trend of intruding upon officers' Article 8 and 10 rights to find examples of thought crime shared with a private and consenting audience, I find it difficult to grasp how it advances the safety of the public to go about stringing people up for some joke they made or someone else in a group chat they happened to be in made. If anything I think it probably causes greater damage to public confidence to go looking for things to turn into news stories, when there might well not be any suggestion that the officers concerned conduct themselves anything other than fairly and impartially on duty. The meme may well be offensive and tasteless, I expect none of us here have seen it, but that doesn't make an emotional reaction sensible. You once made a post about punching people in the solar plexus in custody suites, which is arguably also a mindset incompatible with modern policing. Careful with those stones in your glass house.
    1 point
  27. I have a bit of sympathy for your point. I think the issue is people need to understand anything to do with technology isn’t private. As others have said mobile communications can be shared and being real issues for officers and force. I agree most people will have had a very poor joke or similar, even people grandstanding on here however there seems to be an issue, in particular in net where officers seem to be pushing it and seem to have a complete lack of understanding about the issue
    1 point
  28. If you're driving a car on a public road you have to lawfully display a number plate, you're in a public place. I don't see an issue with it personally and I'm quite traditionally libertarian.
    1 point
  29. I dont understand why to my knowledge no London council that manages it's own parks police has ever approached parliament asking for an amendment to legislation granting authority to extend their park constable appointment powers to other matters that local authorities take control of such as flytipping or street nuisance. Newham effectively decided to just break the remit its officers had and just enforce law and order outside of parks/open spaces without any agreement from the Met or legislative power and it blew up in their faces, rightly so. I also find it strange no Association exists to protect parks officers interests or advance the use of them is in place. Cathedral Constable Association (CCA) exists. Port Police Chief Association also exists. Yet nothing for parks plod.
    1 point
  30. Without seeing the “inappropriate graphic” it’s hard to make an informed judgement on the situation. My guess is “inappropriate graphic” means a meme. They are essentially modern internet satire. In my mind they’re the replacement to the old style political cartoons you see in certain papers. They make light of distasteful or difficult topics, much like memes. If you were to show a colleague a satirical cartoon from the paper about the same topic you wouldn’t get hauled in, would you? In the grand scheme of things, is sharing a meme…sorry “inappropriate graphic”…really something that should be attracting such a response? Are there not bigger issues within the police at the moment?
    1 point
  31. One day the papers bemoan a lack of intel sharing. The next they're up in arms about the privacy of citizens and data protection. Then the secret cabal that is the NPCC is looking to pull the rug out from under the whole Criminal Justice system. Oh woe!! I shan't be clicking on the link.
    1 point
  32. The work arounds already exist and are in use. Over 70,000 people in the UK currently use Tor to protect their privacy and I suspect that number would surge if something like this came in. My view is that there's a place for real names but there's also a place for anonymity. Facebook is great for keeping in contact with people who have moved away, but less so if you want to discuss anything unpopular or controversial as there will always be someone who takes offence and might cause problems for you. Would officers on here feel comfortable criticizing an incident or criticizing the IOPC on here if they had to state their name and station they were based at as well?
    1 point
  33. By your own comments earlier you claimed people watching IIOC created a market for it and they should be punished. Surely that is exactly the same for drugs, the harm drug production does to people is insurmountable.
    1 point
  34. Mountain rescue teams will almost invariably be using their vehicles for policing or ambulance purposes as they're always requested for an incident by the respective control room, so the way S87 is written they would meet the criteria for the exemptions even if they're expected by some policy or MOI not to use them.
    1 point
  35. You may behind the times and concepts for emergency type driving. A few years ago, drivers were encouraged to give way to blue lights, even moving over at red ATS. However, even on blue lights, let alone green ones, the MOP are not encouraged to do do such things, in fact, they get prosecuted for passing a red light when trying to help blue lights get through. So the idea hat using a green light is even more hazardous both for the MOP and the green light driver. oh f the likes of CFRs are not permitted blues by their instructing health service, I cannot imagine they would support the use of green ones. Tm s legislation and the safety issues do not support it. IMHO, either be qualified snd sanctioned by the law to use blues, or follow in the traffic flow like everyone else.
    1 point
  36. Large scale national systems have proved to be impossible to deliver. See the national Fire Service control room fiasco and attempts at a single NHS system as examples.
    1 point
  37. I don't think so. Regarding your comparison to mechanics and other professions, the difference as I see it is that they aren't going to arrest you because your car is defective. The role of police officer isn't just any old job or profession, you occupy a rather unique position of authority, you can deprive people of their liberty when they commit a crime. I think it's reasonable that with that power comes the expectation of adhering to a higher standard.
    1 point
  38. Mechanics aren't going to arrest me if my car is defective, the police are in a rather unique position of authority. If an officer breaks the laws he would happily arrest other people for, I think its reasonable that the punishment be tougher.
    1 point
  39. Don’t commit crime and the police won’t use force 🤷🏻‍♂️
    1 point
  40. If they are not worrying they may be wondering how to answer. The Fed are your best route.
    1 point
  41. I’ll let you make your own mind up OST. Also feel I’d get in trouble if I gave me thoughts on it. you don’t have to be super fit or a black belt or anything like that but it’s confidence with the public and usefulness to the team you’re going on. Ultimately in my opinion the use of force, whilst not the most frequently used skill is ultimately the difference between police and other agencies. (E.g mental health teams request police if conflict, social services request help if conflict). I’ve been on teams where most of lads have been mix of ex prison officers, gym rats, boxers, rugby players etc (although not all as useful as you’d think) and teams where there hasn’t been a soul who can handle themselves. You’ve done really well getting this far and completely natural to be excited and full of questions but as much as possible enjoy time you have left away from policing and go in with a open mind.
    1 point
  42. Her question was irrelevant as none of it would have prevented the alleged rape.
    1 point
  43. We are forbidden to show knives on our social media because it "encourages " those who are on the boundary between carrying and not carrying to carry, out of fear that others carry. I dont buy it, but it's a very easy target to go after police than actually try and solve the problems that cause the knife crime. I suppose if you constantly thrash the met over stop search they are going to want to show why it's needed. We have a special technology used to prevent these problems, we have insufficient staff to stop search people, so don't get stick for it.
    1 point
  44. So, here s the question, now we know it was used for training. Was It an actual,real life incident, OR, perhaps, it was a training excercise to maximise the elements to be discussed . perhaps, you’d raise the question or would consider how you might respond to the question. If the officer was allocated to check out, on their own, the presence of firearms or weapons by a control room and sanctioned, presumably by a supervisor, did you wonder why the officer accepted the call - clearly contrary to your policy, why they were sent - clearly against policy.. are you getting the idea. as for gloves. As above, if we were thinking about evidence then gloves but otherwise, why? you’ve yet to suggest how a firearm / shotgun certificate renewal can be done by anyone other than an armed response unit!
    1 point
  45. They threshold isn’t certainty though, that would be absurd. The reasons warrants are executed is in order to gather evidence. If they were “certain” then they wouldn’t need more evidence would they?
    1 point
  46. If you did it your suggested way drug warrants would seldom be done. If you’re going to make an omelette…
    1 point
  47. Why don’t you ask me your self ? It doesn’t really matter what they think I have the right to do what I do end of
    1 point
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