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Best approach to CD ripping


prolixia
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At the moment my digital music collection is a mess, and I've decided to spend a few evenings watching films and re-ripping all my CDs to start afresh. I don't plan to repeat this exercise again so I want to make sure I don't have any regrets as to how I do the job now.

My plan is to store a master copy of my collection in the loss-less FLAC format and make sure that all the tags, artwork, etc. are correct before transcoding a copy of the library as 320 KBps MP3s. I plan to use the MP3s day-to-day and keep the FLAC files in case my requirements change in the future and I want to rebuild my library in a different format. I'm aware how large the FLAC library will be.

Any advice before I start would be welcomed. I plan to use Media Monkey to rip the CDs and add the artwork and tags - is this the best choice? Is there any good reason to pay for the Gold version versus using the free version and the LAME MP3 encoder?

Cheers!

Edited by prolixia
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I find that the best way to rip CDs is with your mum jokes. That seems to do the trick.

Personally I'd manually add the tags, You may view a song as a different genre to what it's being tagged in, and it allows you to link two songs/bands that you want to listen together.

For example, I have a lot of bands tagged as metal or heavy rock, depending, as I tend to want to listen to them together, even if they're not strictly speaking metal (heavier or lighter). If that makes sense.

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There's no point using a 320Kbps bitrate. Go for a 192Kbps variable bitrate MP3 to get the best sound with the least wasted space.

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  • 1 month later...

As I have a reeeeally good sound system, 192 variable sounds kinda average. If you are concerned about storage space then this is a fantastic option.

With the cost of disk space though, I'd make a decision on how you wish to store the files, and what you are going to play back the music with. I'm converting to lossless audio, and yes, you can tell the difference on a good enough system. That said, not at all if it's a mobile phone or normal mp3 player.

Edited by 5460
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I'm converting to lossless audio, and yes, you can tell the difference on a good enough system.

I'd challenge that. A lot of people say what you've said, but it's simply not the case because of how the MP3 encoding standard works. Once you get to a certain bitrate, the audio reproduced isn't any different despite technically being lossy.

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