Jump to content

Self defence & fun! for my 5 yeard old son


operationfirestorm
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I am trying to figure out the best place to take my son to start some self defence classes life kung fu or kick boxing.

He has a lot of energy and really needs to channel it, coupled with the fact that i want him to be able to defend himself in this sometimes hard world.

He is 5 years old has just started swimming with his mum but i wanted to take him somewhere for self defence.

I am not keen on karate, i did that but stopped and then did boxing instead. Boxing was much better.

He does not live with me but he lives in the Croydon area but i drive so i can drive into other bordering areas after school or even further at weekends.

Any ideas? what would you recommend and where? do you have kids that attend any? what are your experiences.

Any advice most appreciated.

Edited by operationfirestorm
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I started judo at that age and would recommend it. It's good for building confidence and teaching respect etc but it's more a sport than a martial art. Yes you can use it as a defence but you need to be up close and personally I would want to be much further apart in a fight!

As for clubs I would suggest sticking British Judo Association into Google and using their club finder as I am a bit rusty on which clubs are good nowadays.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Am a massive believer in martial arts - not just for self defence but it teaches respect, confidence and inner peace in some aspects. Personally train in Muay Thai, great for what your looking for :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did judo too at that age, and loved it!

As said, it teaches respect and discipline, and with a belt structure, it gives visible goals to head towards too, which kids can aim for.

As for actual self defence, I've looked around a bit, and I see that a combination of boxing and judo have been recommended on forums such as martial arts planet. It may be best for him to stick to one discipline until he becomes proficient though, for now.

For a single self defence art, muay Thai is well regarded, like ozzy said. Krav maga is also simple yet brutal, but that can have a poor reputation depending on where you get taught. Avoid anything with 'commando' in the name, and do a lot of asking around if you find a class near you!

I did Krav for a while, and loved the simplicity of it, and none of the ' leaping around in white pyjamas' aspect, but mine was a good class, with a great instructor.

At his age, I think anything he tries will be more for confidence than learning anything useful, until he gets older, so maybe let him try a couple (bit stick at them for a good while each) until he can,decide for himself.

A rambling post, hope it helps :)

Edited by Shmook
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As above Krav Maga is awesome discipline but just make sure the instructor is an official instructor. Not a self styled expert!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do Karate. It does get a lot of the "prancing around in white pajamas" comments but there are reasons for it. The training can seem quite dull to those who have little patience or understanding of key fighting concepts (those of core strength and power being driven up from the legs and through the hips.) There also tends to be an expectation within the non martial arts world that you can wander into the clubs and come out 2 weeks later able to fight to a high standard.

If I had more time on my hands I would definitely cross train as one martial art is nowhere near enough. The better combinations almost always combine some form of Brazillian Ju-Jitsu with a stand-up fighting style like Karate (think fighters like Lyoto Machida) or Muay Thai.

Personally, I love my Karate (Shotokan) and really enjoy teaching it as well. It's one of the few that really combines all aspects of fighting together with grappling/throws and groundwork. But it's not for everyone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's less about the actual martial art and more about who teaches it and what the environment is like. You want to find a place that has good role models as teachers who are enthusiastic. Furthermore, it's not only your choice, it's your son's as well. Take him to a few taster sessions and see what he prefers and then check you like the place too. If he doesn't enjoy it he won't stick with it.

Edited by Burnsy2023
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do Karate. It does get a lot of the "prancing around in white pajamas" comments

I'm sorry, I wasn't having a dig at other martial arts!

I also did soo bahk do for a few years, which was all fancy kicks and pyjamas too!

What I meant was, when I did Krav, I wanted something simple and effective - which I think it is - without repeated forms and compliant sparring partners. Pressure testing was a big part of it.

Again, sorry, and I'm not trying to tar all arts with the same brush :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone, just got in, am going to look sme of these up this evening and I will let you know what I do. I appreciate all viewpoints especially the idea of getting my son to try different types so he can decide for himself and that the trainer/tutor is committed/good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's less about the actual martial art and more about who teaches it and what the environment is like.   You want to find a place that has good role models as teachers who are enthusiastic.  Furthermore, it's not only your choice, it's your son's as well.  Take him to a few taster sessions and see what he prefers and then check you like the place too.  If he doesn't enjoy it he won't stick with it.

That's a very valid point, some judo clubs I know are far more competition orientated whilst others offer a more welcoming and friendly atmosphere.

Nearly all the judo clubs I have been to offer a free first session and then a couple of discount lessons to see if the class is suitable so as others say it's worth taking your son to a few and see how he enjoys them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm sorry, I wasn't having a dig at other martial arts!

I also did soo bahk do for a few years, which was all fancy kicks and pyjamas too!

What I meant was, when I did Krav, I wanted something simple and effective - which I think it is - without repeated forms and compliant sparring partners. Pressure testing was a big part of it.

Again, sorry, and I'm not trying to tar all arts with the same brush :)

I wasn't for a second suggesting you were! Don't worry, I love the functional stuff as well and I do an hour of plain clothed street fighting to finish my classes on a Tuesday. Not all of it is strictly karate but you can draw so much from all the kata that it's pretty much all there anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wasn't for a second suggesting you were! Don't worry, I love the functional stuff as well and I do an hour of plain clothed street fighting to finish my classes on a Tuesday. Not all of it is strictly karate but you can draw so much from all the kata that it's pretty much all there anyway.

Now that sounds like a useful class, best of both worlds!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that sounds like a useful class, best of both worlds!

Yeah, a lot of it takes traditional Shotokan techniques and just adapts them for use in a close up attack scenario. After all, these ancient martial arts were designed to defend an unarmed human being from attack by another person, armed or unarmed. People haven't changed that much!

We tend to focus on your common "Friday night fighter" attacks, wild swinging haymakers etc. all very useful!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, a lot of it takes traditional Shotokan techniques and just adapts them for use in a close up attack scenario. After all, these ancient martial arts were designed to defend an unarmed human being from attack by another person, armed or unarmed. People haven't changed that much!

We tend to focus on your common "Friday night fighter" attacks, wild swinging haymakers etc. all very useful!

I really like that. Not just mindlessly following training hundreds of years old (not a dig by the way), adapting it for modern day use :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...