Jump to content

PIcking a first bike...


((TheShake))1546081325
 Share

Recommended Posts

Evening all.

I've been running for a while and I've got a couple races lined up (a 15km next weekend and a half marathon at the end of October). I'm considering taking a new challenge and entering a triathlon. The main problem I have is that I don't have a bike.

I'm looking for a suitable road bike, not too expensive (around £400 or less). I'll need it to last me at least a couple of years.

Basically I'm after your advice as to what would be the best thing to get?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Evening all.

I've been running for a while and I've got a couple races lined up (a 15km next weekend and a half marathon at the end of October). I'm considering taking a new challenge and entering a triathlon. The main problem I have is that I don't have a bike.

I'm looking for a suitable road bike, not too expensive (around £400 or less). I'll need it to last me at least a couple of years.

Basically I'm after your advice as to what would be the best thing to get?

This

http://www.halfords.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_storeId_10001_catalogId_10151_productId_787107_langId_-1_categoryId_165765

Canny be beat :new_doh2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well if you're looking to win by going fast, something which can handle rough terrain, reliable, not high maintenance.

01ktm-adventure.jpg

That should do it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you said "first bike", I thought you meant something like this:

mxrmicro_red.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have a nose of http://www.policespecials.com/forum/index.php?/topic/65996-pscom-cyclists/page-25

for a £400 mark you're looking at a road bike of about 12kg weight and probably 2 x 8 gears.

couple of suggestions

http://www.edinburghbicycle.com/products/revolution-continental-13?bct=browse%2fbicycles%2froad-bikes\

revolution-continental-13.jpg

this was my 1st road bike, quite heavy but does the job and is a good build for the money

really for the £400 mark all similar spec.

if you are doing tri what you could also get is some 'clip on tri bars' for about 30 quid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the answers both helpful and not so.

What are the opinions on fixie bikes?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you said "first bike", I thought you meant something like this:

mxrmicro_red.jpg

I'd 'strayed' onto this thread thinking it might have been about ex-wives :whistle2: But seriously, I'm useless on 2 wheels (motorised), so I suppose the above would be just up my street. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the answers both helpful and not so.

What are the opinions on fixie bikes?

Fixed gear bikes are fun to ride and very easy to maintain and are therefore particularly good for commuting, but they're not what you want for a triathalon. If you're racing, riding up and down hills, and trying to conserve your energy then both the lack of gears and the lack of a freewheel are going to become tiresome pretty quickly.

I have a single speed bike (Genesis Skyline) that I converted to a fixed gear. I rode it like that for about a year and loved it, but in the end I found that it was unnecessarily tough on my knees (probably in part due to a lack of technique on my part) and I was constantly worried about clipping my pedals on the front wheel whilst turning or on the ground/kerb. I now ride it only as a freewheel (i.e. the wheels can spin whilst I hold the pedals still, making that clicking noise), which isn't as urban-cool, but I find I prefer. I don't regret trying it as a fixie though.

Incidentally, the normal state of affairs for single speed bikes is that the back wheel can be removed and flipped over, and one side will have a freewheel cog on it with the other having a thread that allows you to attach a fixed cog (cost for a decent one with a lock ring would be something like £40, from memory) so that you can use the bike fixed or freewheel as you like. It was once the case that single speed bikes were quite unusual and you basically had to build your own, but they're now popular and there are no end of great bikes readily available (within your price range, as it happens - but not suitable for a triathalon).

By the way, check to see if your employer does the 'bike to work' scheme. It allows you to effectively buy a bike in monthly installments from your pre-tax salary, potentially saving you a lot of money (especially if you pay tax at the higher rates).

Edited by Prolixia
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They do do the bike to work scheme but I'm a little worried by the fact that you have to shop at Halfords...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They do do the bike to work scheme but I'm a little worried by the fact that you have to shop at Halfords...

I'm not sure it's exclusively Halfords though - although I'm using them for the Scheme next week. Brand new bike, can't wait!!

You any further forward in deciding?

Edited by Pablo Montoya
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've contacted my HR enquiring about the scheme... I did notice on the scheme website that you're actually hiring the bike (and equipment) for for the period it takes you to pay them back and then you may have to pay more to become the legal owner!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They do do the bike to work scheme but I'm a little worried by the fact that you have to shop at Halfords...

I had the same problem. However, Halfords can order in pretty much any bike you like and sell you that under the scheme - so you're not stuck with their meager offerings. I'd suggest doing it through a Halfords Bike Hut rather than a regular Halfords store - after it's delivered the bike will need 'building' (in reality just fitting the handlebars, adjusting the brakes, etc.) and in my experience Halfords to an amazingly poor job at this (my wife bought a bike from them as a student, and one of the pedals fell off on the way home!).

I ordered my single speed bike through a non-Bikehut Halfords on the bike to work scheme and took a 15mm spanner and a set of Allen keys with me when I collected it. After I'd tightened up everything they'd fitted it was fine.

Another option is to order the bike from Halfords and then get a local bike shop to build it (or at least check it over) before you ride it. The saving on the bike will be very much more than the fairly small cost of the build/check.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...