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Bmw Power steerling pump


BlockMan
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Hello all!

Being more of computer guy than a mechanic, I need to know if a power steering pump from a e36 316 will work in a e36 320?

Thank you!

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Should do if they are both the same model 3 series. The last 2 digits on a BMW series number are just the engine size. E.g. A 316 is a 1.6l 3 series, 320 is a 2.0l 3 series.

Not a mechanic but previously did a project on BMWs for GCSE maths and had to research how the BMW numbering system works.

Edited by David
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Should do if they are both the same model 3 series. The last 2 digits on a BMW series number are just the engine size. E.g. A 316 is a 1.6l 3 series, 320 is a 2.0l 3 series.

Not a mechanic but previously did a project on BMWs for GCSE maths and had to research how the BMW numbering system works.

Not necessarily ;) if you look at the models released over the last 10 years. Take the new 3 series 328 for example, that only has a 2.0 litre engine in it. The new 114 had a 1.6 in it etc... More so at the moment the last 2 digits denote the range of HP and torque it has ;)

All aside, yes the power steering pump should work if its going from one e36 into another. BMW are good with interchangeable parts, we're not talking vauxhall here that puts electronic power steering on a corsa 1.4 sxi but puts a hydraulic system on a 1.2 :new_sneaky2:

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Not necessarily ;) if you look at the models released over the last 10 years. Take the new 3 series 328 for example, that only has a 2.0 litre engine in it. The new 114 had a 1.6 in it etc... More so at the moment the last 2 digits denote the range of HP and torque it has ;)

It was 7 years ago that I took the GCSE exams and 8 years since the project but that was how BMW told me their numbering system worked back then.

And yeah, VX are brilliant at that type thing. Another brilliant VXism is how, on model C corsas all engine sizes have timing belts except the 1.0l....

Edited by Burnie
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And yeah, VX are brilliant at that type thing. Another brilliant VXism is how, on model C corsas all engine sizes have timing belts except the 1.0l....

Yeah no kidding, plus the filament oil filter used on the 1.0l with great access, but they used a screw on filter for every other engine size that not even a tooth pick could fit near it... nightmare. I certainly don't miss having a Corsa C. Another thing that puzzles me is why VX use electronic power steering on the majority of their models when it is prone to failure, and you have to replace the whole steering rack (which is more expensive) when it finally gives in.

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Yarp, whrn I was learning to drive and so doing repeated manoeuvres such as doing just 2-3 bay parking or reversing around corner manoeuvres the electronic PAS would overheat and stop...

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Should do if they are both the same model 3 series. The last 2 digits on a BMW series number are just the engine size. E.g. A 316 is a 1.6l 3 series, 320 is a 2.0l 3 series.

Not a mechanic but previously did a project on BMWs for GCSE maths and had to research how the BMW numbering system works.

MEGANERD!

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MEGANERD!

No, we had to do a project on correlation of various factors in second hand motors and one of the factors was engine size but there weren't any engine sizes listed for the BMWs on our list so I rang the local BMW dealership to find out if there was a way to figure out the engine size.

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No, we had to do a project on correlation of various factors in second hand motors and one of the factors was engine size but there weren't any engine sizes listed for the BMWs on our list so I rang the local BMW dealership to find out if there was a way to figure out the engine size.

Double Mechanical Meganerd.

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Double Mechanical Meganerd.

No meganerd was doing a pre-uni gap year working for a Civil Aerospace Gas Turbine ('jet engine') company in their Whole Engine Design department and in that year becoming the 'goto' guy for questions on the rotor tip clearance calculation software...

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No meganerd was doing a pre-uni gap year working for a Civil Aerospace Gas Turbine ('jet engine') company in their Whole Engine Design department and in that year becoming the 'goto' guy for questions on the rotor tip clearance calculation software...

The irony of that statement is not lost on me :)

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