Jump to content

Good Deeds that Go Tits Up / Pair Shaped


support1546080886
 Share

Recommended Posts

Earlier this week I was in my personal car driving into work to start a late shift when I came across a car that appeared to be broken down with some frontal damage on a very busy rural A class road, the vehicle was on a bend on a hill and was causing other road users considerable difficulties in passing in the face of on coming traffic.

As I approached the scene I noticed the driver sitting in the car and disabled stickers on the car, I stopped my car just in front of the vehicle put on my lights and hazard warning indicators, grabbed a florie from the boot, I initially spoke to the driver and established that the car was out of fuel and the driver had no calling credit as the mobile was a pay as you go.

I called on behalf of the driver the Recovery who cover mobility vehicles and despite the vulnerable location and vehicle being mobility I was advised of a lead time of around 2 hours due to the weather the Recovery were busier than normal.

Given all the circumstances I thought the best idea would be to offer to tow the car about half a mile to a lay-by at the top of the hill on a flat section where the driver would be safe and the Recovery could assist the driver easier all considered, after a quick chat with the driver I offered to tow the car and driver to the lay-by and this was accepted, I then explained to the driver that they would need to break as we leveled out near to the lay-by and would need to do the breaking for me to put it in simple terms as the rope becomes less taught, any problems sound the horn.

Simply I believed that as the driver given all the circumstances was vulnerable and at serious risk of his car being collided with, in part as there was ice and the road is used by HGV's and has heavy traffic flow, by towing the car to a safe location to await rescue this would be the safest solution in my experience.

Just as a comment I drive a 4 x 4 and always carry a 5 m towing rope, I do a little off green laning in the summer months and it always comes in handy to be well equipped living in the countryside.

As I started to move off with broken down car on my tow rope all seemed to be going well as we climbed to the top of the hill and the lay-by was getting closer by the minute, suddenly I noticed from a side road up a head a vehicle which decided at the last minute to pull out, I gently applied my breaks and thought that the driver on tow would also do the same, NO such luck, I suddenly seen the car on tow approach the back of my car in the mirror and then appear to come along side me before hitting a sign post on the opposite carriageway with a glancing blow to the drivers door.

Some how it was a miracle that the car on the tow rope did not run into the back of me, I immediately got out my car and checked the driver of the car on tow to discover that the driver had for some completely unknown reason decided not to break when I slowed down. The driver was ok after a quick conversation and managed to tow the driver and car to the lay-by without further incident, thank god.

After reaching the lay-by and given the events minutes earlier I decided it best to ask the driver for there details and to provide them with my details to be on the safe side, given the temp was - 2 and the disabled driver was on there own without calling credit I decided to stay with the driver until recovery arrived, which in the event took around 1 hr to turn up.

Given that I acted as a good samaritan is there any risk of being claimed against by the disabled driver or there insurer for the accident whilst under tow ?

To cover my self I have written up some notes in the form of a personal statement and made a drawing of the location in case I am contacted ?

Anyone else experienced things going Tits up when trying to help ?

Thanks all.

C.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not the same situation but o/s Victoria station having a cigarette after work one day (around midnight) when a well to do looking woman jumps out of a black cab pays the driver then unceremoniously about 6 or 7 banknotes come flurrying out of of her bag or whatever. Some scatter a metre away and as it was mildly breezy I decide to leap into action to help her. No sooner do I bend over and scoop up £60 and start to utter "'here you are love" than I feel agonising pain across my head twice and I can't remember what she said but she also screamed. I presume it was a handbag or a purse that she hit me with, and so stunned I shouted at her that I wasn't trying to nick it.

Wrongly or rightly I fumbled into my pocket and held out my PCSO ID and badge and explained that I wasn't trying to steal from her. I handed the money back to which she replied "Someone like you shouldn't come running over like that"

With several onlookers I slinked off embarassed at the commotion, but seething over her final comment. To this day I don't know what she meant about "someone like you" unless she means young. She didn't even apologise for thwacking me!

Similar again since I have been in Liverpool, a woman and a man were having an animated argument in a club and then the lads pushed her, I stepped in and went to calm things down and asked if she was alright stepping in between her and the man. I got told to foxtrot oscar and slapped in the face, much to my mate's amusement.

Sometimes you wonder why you bother...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sometimes you wonder why you bother...

Quiet agree with the comments.

I often wonder why bother helping as you rarely get any thanks, does make you realize why MoP's don't want to get involved if all you get is grief for your good efforts.

This is the second time I have stopped to help at incidents on the road since New Year and so far both went pair shaped.

The other incident was coming across a vehicle crashed into a field / hedge one Sunday, with a group of young people looking on at the scene, basically the car had been driven by a boy racer and lost control.

Upon closer examination it turned out the car had 4 bald tyres, no RFL 2 years out of date, the driver disclosed to me that he did not have insurance and had just passed his test.

As a result of the circumstances I called police on the mobi and explained the situation, whilst on the phone one of the boy racers mates turned up and decided to try and intimidate me and threaten me unless I went away, I held my ground aware that units were running to me as the operator made the job as an immediate.

End result boy racer lost his car, acquired numerous penalty points, a large fine that no doubt mummy and daddy will be paying for little johnny, and he also lost his licence under the 2 first 2 years rules.

The nasty one who thought it clever to make threats ended up with a £80 ticket for his weekend.

End result bad guys NIL.

I have to admit though being a little nervous around this one as I was on my own and out numbered 8 to 1, very glad when the blue lights started to appear along with 2 units on the hurry up, very grateful for prompt assistance.

Did have the potential to Light Up and go tits up.

Edited by support
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our standard disclaimer: This forum is not intended as a legal advice drop-in centre. PoliceSpecials.com disclaims any and all responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, completeness, legality, reliability, operability or availability of information or material on this site, including - but not limited to - the documents available in the 'Reference Library' and 'Downloads' areas.

Please note that comments and advice given here with the best of intentions by the host, moderators or other users of the forum may not be correct, and that any advice given, in particular advice on the law and its application, is no substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our standard disclaimer: This forum is not intended as a legal advice drop-in centre. PoliceSpecials.com disclaims any and all responsibility or liability for the accuracy, content, completeness, legality, reliability, operability or availability of information or material on this site, including - but not limited to - the documents available in the 'Reference Library' and 'Downloads' areas.

Please note that comments and advice given here with the best of intentions by the host, moderators or other users of the forum may not be correct, and that any advice given, in particular advice on the law and its application, is no substitute for personal legal advice from a solicitor.

Wait what - Legal Advice? Where? :)

Anyway - only one for me was stood in the supermarket que at Sainsbury's behind an older lady. She had left her handbag on her trolly baby seat, handle facing me, handbag wide open and purse on the top. I just said 'Scuse me, I wouldn't leave your handbag like that if I were you, my gran got her purse nicked and you don't know who I could have been'

Lets just say the reply I got was less than polite, suggested I had been born out of wedlock and that I should keep my rather oversized nose out of other peoples business. Well I hope she remembers that when someone has away with her purse :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone gave me the finger when I pulled up beside them at traffic lights and pointed at the back of their car.

I wonder at what point later they noticed the smoke billowing out of the back of their car which I was pointing out

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wait what - Legal Advice? Where? :whistle:

I believe it may be due to the question "Given that I acted as a good samaritan is there any risk of being claimed against by the disabled driver or there insurer for the accident whilst under tow ?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Global Moderators

Similar story to MerseyLLB when a woman, about 55/60 dropped £70 or so from an ATM, the wind blew it, I picked it up and as I handed it back I saw this thing flying towards me, was a handbag. She missed and I explained I was giving her the money back and was merely trying to help. I get a round of fecks, get told I'm a busybody and, and this was the better part; 'You people need to know when not to help people' and yes, I got called a barsteward.

Pardon me for helping you...

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Support... I'd strongly recommend a "tow pole", fairly cheap for a domestic one, around £20 I think (and breaks down into 3 parts, so they don't take up very much room in the boot), and much much better than a rope. Especially if you're towing someone that's (shall we say) an unknown quantity. It means that you're still in full control (as the tower) of all the braking, and all they have to do is steer and (hopefully) follow you.

41XfAwM6xeL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Support... I'd strongly recommend a "tow pole", fairly cheap for a domestic one, around £20 I think (and breaks down into 3 parts, so they don't take up very much room in the boot), and much much better than a rope. Especially if you're towing someone that's (shall we say) an unknown quantity. It means that you're still in full control (as the tower) of all the braking, and all they have to do is steer and (hopefully) follow you.

41XfAwM6xeL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

I glad you said, hopefully follow you, we used poles like this on this The AA, and no matter how much you explain "follow me, no matter what" and they say yes ok, we even had cards printed for them to read and than explained it, how ever just following seemed to be a very hard thing to do. Some times your get all the way to their home, than they would and drive on to their drive way, why still attached to the back of your van.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Similar story to MerseyLLB when a woman, about 55/60 dropped £70 or so from an ATM, the wind blew it, I picked it up and as I handed it back I saw this thing flying towards me, was a handbag. She missed and I explained I was giving her the money back and was merely trying to help. I get a round of fecks, get told I'm a busybody and, and this was the better part; 'You people need to know when not to help people' and yes, I got called a barsteward.

Pardon me for helping you...

I would've gone "Oh alright then" and dropped the cash back on the ground.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure how insurance stands on towing other vehicles, so it's not just a case of are you liable to a claim, but are you covered!

It seems to be the fault of the driver being towed so if they have any sense they wouldn't try and claim off you.

They sound like they are approaching the stage where they should turn in their licence from the events you describe.

Fortunately nothing has gone 'Pete Tong' when trying to help people, but you are on a hiding to nothing sometimes when trying to draw drivers attention to not having lights on/flat tyre/something hanging off the car/ etc as they are all deaf or have tunnel vision!

BTW....

It's Pear Shaped, not pair

Your car has brakes, not breaks :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...