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Recommended exercises


Deividdo
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First of, I am fully aware that this is not a place to ask for such advice, but I am pretty sure there are going to be people who may have a few good tips for someone like me.

I am not looking to become Hulk, not yet anyway. Moreover, I just want to get stronger. So, what exercises do you recommend for a beginner? I have never been in a gym, and it is not one of the environments I particularly like, I want to try and keep it at home for now.

I have looked online, and a lot of people say that 20 sit ups and 20 press ups every morning on will help with my upper and lower body. I am not fat, far from it; and I do eat healthy, I just don't seem to gain weight normally as I have a very high metabolism. I was also told to do as many as I can, then divide that number by 4 and use that as a baseline, keep a log of how many I was able to do and follow the same thing.

I have also heard that this is suppose to be 'overtraining'. I am not exactly a body building specialist, so I wouldn't know if it was or not. I do doubt it though.

I am just beginning my journey of hopefully becoming a special, and I decided I should start early because I don't know if I can push or pull the required weights in the fitness test.

Would this 'routine' help with pushing and pulling, and is it effective? I just want to feel more fit, as I cannot pack on the pounds unless I sit down and scoff cheese burgers from McDonalds; and obviously improve my general fitness for the fitness test if I get there.

Thanks for your responses.

Edited by Deividdo
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First of all, eat properly - plenty of starchy foods and protein. I'm of the opinion that a decent diet is all you need and the supplements you can spend a fortune on come somewhere between marginally useful and outright magic beans, but doubtless others will disagree.

Body weight exercises at home are absolutely fine for building strength - the Royal Marines have an excellent section of their website devoted to advising potential nods how to get fitter here. Come up with a decent plan, don't focus on upper-body to the exclusion of all else and concentrate on training yourself to a high standard rather than measuring yourself again the police fitness test. Have at least one day off a week, and if you don't really enjoy exercise for exercise's sake then work it into something you're more likely to enjoy and so stick to, such as biking to work or a sport. I know of plenty of cops who are into MMA, Krav Maga or the like - aside from any direct uses it may have it'll teach you to manage adrenaline and give you a good work-out.

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Some great guides for bodyweight exercises:

http://hundredpushups.com/

http://www.twohundredsitups.com/

Don't be put off if it's tough or you have to repeat a week. Keep at it and you will see yourself get noticeably stronger!

Also if you enjoy lifting weights but hate the gym have a look into kettlebells. Essentially a cast iron cannonball with a handle on it which you can do a variety of exercises with to build muscle and also practically work as cardio at the same time.

Don't forget cardio is just as important, if not more important than anything listed above in terms of exercise. Go for a jog around the block! I have a guide similar to the above which'll get you running 10k in 2 months or so. Let me know if you're interested and I'll go dig it up!

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First of all, eat properly - plenty of starchy foods and protein. I'm of the opinion that a decent diet is all you need and the supplements you can spend a fortune on come somewhere between marginally useful and outright magic beans, but doubtless others will disagree.

Body weight exercises at home are absolutely fine for building strength - the Royal Marines have an excellent section of their website devoted to advising potential nods how to get fitter here. Come up with a decent plan, don't focus on upper-body to the exclusion of all else and concentrate on training yourself to a high standard rather than measuring yourself again the police fitness test. Have at least one day off a week, and if you don't really enjoy exercise for exercise's sake then work it into something you're more likely to enjoy and so stick to, such as biking to work or a sport. I know of plenty of cops who are into MMA, Krav Maga or the like - aside from any direct uses it may have it'll teach you to manage adrenaline and give you a good work-out.

I have been looking at protein drinks; not sure if I really need to do it that way though. Like you said, it is the sort of thing that you would probably use in the last moments before you do something.

When I exercised at a young age, I did enjoy it. I am pretty sure I can enjoy it one I get a routine going and stick with it.

I want to focus on both my upper and lower body, without neglect.

That site offers a lot of handy information, thanks for that!

Some great guides for bodyweight exercises:

http://hundredpushups.com/

http://www.twohundredsitups.com/

Don't be put off if it's tough or you have to repeat a week. Keep at it and you will see yourself get noticeably stronger!

Also if you enjoy lifting weights but hate the gym have a look into kettlebells. Essentially a cast iron cannonball with a handle on it which you can do a variety of exercises with to build muscle and also practically work as cardio at the same time.

Don't forget cardio is just as important, if not more important than anything listed above in terms of exercise. Go for a jog around the block! I have a guide similar to the above which'll get you running 10k in 2 months or so. Let me know if you're interested and I'll go dig it up!

I try and avoid doing any running/jogging simply because I doubt it is going to be useful other than useful for improving my endurance because, as I said, I don't gain weight easily. But, I always go out every day, so I suppose I could get to my locations in style.

I don't hate gyms, I've never experienced what it's like, but I have an idea of what it's like, and for someone of my self, I don't think I would even fit in quite yet. I would use the gym if I could not go any further at home or really needed to body build.

Before I exercise, I always make sure my blood is rushing, and check that my BPM is between 130 and 160 before any exercises as recommended by an online resource.

I'd definitely be interested in that other guide, thanks!

Those two sites are really nice, easy to navigate, and offer concise information and more importantly confidence. Thanks!

EDIT:

I saw the author of that website has also authored a book. I just ordered it.

Edited by Deividdo
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Check out a local authority leisure centre if it's practical, I am a member of the one local to me and I pay £29 per month for unlimited classes as I don't like using the gym itself. You will find they are not as 'swanky' as private gyms but they are cheaper and not such a nightmare to leave if you get fed up with it. You have only to Google the horror stories of users trying to leave LA Fitness to see what I mean.

You may find, as I did, that you prefer the regime of classes such as body pump (very effective for all over muscle conditioning) as it's a class you have to attend rather than finding the willpower to drag your backside off to the gym, say after work. There's also body combat and spin amongst others.

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Check out a local authority leisure centre if it's practical, I am a member of the one local to me and I pay £29 per month for unlimited classes as I don't like using the gym itself. You will find they are not as 'swanky' as private gyms but they are cheaper and not such a nightmare to leave if you get fed up with it. You have only to Google the horror stories of users trying to leave LA Fitness to see what I mean.

You may find, as I did, that you prefer the regime of classes such as body pump (very effective for all over muscle conditioning) as it's a class you have to attend rather than finding the willpower to drag your backside off to the gym, say after work. There's also body combat and spin amongst others.

I know there is a few around my area, and I would join one (especially for swimming; fun and immensely good for exercising), but I have a tight budget at the moment. I have heard a lot of stories regarding being contracted with gyms. My friend joined one and he had to stay with them for a year before he could 'leave', but he apparently was not told that (he didn't read the fine print), so they tried to take him to court and fine him for breaking the contract. Nothing much really happened...

I just find gyms to be intimidating unless you are of course used to the idea. You'd benefit much more if you could do it any time you wanted, is what I think without the restraints of being signed to contracts, having the money, etc. I am trying to invest in some equipment.

Thanks for your reply.

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I hate the busy gym environment so I use our small station gym, I found over the course of a few weeks (4-5 weeks) of intensive (5 times a week for an hour a time) using just a set of dumbbells and different muscle group exercise's I definitely but on muscle mass as well as form. It's not about the equipment but how you use it and targetting the rights groups. I did use protein shakes after training and found they went down alright, and probably did help in the bulking up process.

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Google 'starting strength'.

Eat more, 'high metabolism' is an excuse skinny people use (i know, I was one).

Eat everything that isn't nailed down, then eat everything that is nailed down, then eat the nails.

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