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fbo194

San Francisco ‘Patrol Specials’ (USA)

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fbo194

Interesting - and possibly unique - in a US city, 

Officers own their beats, are paid by local merchants and residents and have been part of the city since it began. Think they provide their own kit and police their own distinct area alongside the city police.

(Recently been under threat by the city - video highlights that more, but does give background). 

Be a shame if such a community scheme dies off.

 

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Cje.ex999

Very interesting, Thanks for the upload.

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fbo194
Author of the topic Posted

Thought it also epitomised the community officer - working past average retirement, seven days a week and just doing that beat area. Interesting to see what SF City do with them!

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Radman

I've said it before but a quasi-private/hybrid policing model can and does work, we've seen historical examples still successful and in use even in modern day Britain today (ports police are probably worth highlighting here alongside Minster Constables currently operating with full police powers.) 

Many cops seem to want to push for a national or at the very least more regional areas of policing and whilst this would be useful in detecting and policing more organised and serious crime the low level community focused policing would be overlooked. 

One thing I've been fairly critical with the Home Office forces over recent years is their tendency to follow Central Government Targets rather than the issues impacting on their own communities, even with the advent of PCCs there is very little actual oversight in regards to what local tax payers want from their police to what they actually get. 

One thing I've always liked about the US model is how it is very focused on specific geographical areas with local townships and city halls having real sway on what their departments get up to. Specialised or more state wide areas of law enforcement usually have their own bespoke departments in place to tackle those issues be it highways, environmental, infrastructure, transport etc. 

I do think we can learn a thing or two from it. 

 

 

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fbo194
Author of the topic Posted
3 hours ago, Radman said:

I've said it before but a quasi-private/hybrid policing model can and does work, we've seen historical examples still successful and in use even in modern day Britain today (ports police are probably worth highlighting here alongside Minster Constables currently operating with full police powers.) 

Many cops seem to want to push for a national or at the very least more regional areas of policing and whilst this would be useful in detecting and policing more organised and serious crime the low level community focused policing would be overlooked. 

One thing I've been fairly critical with the Home Office forces over recent years is their tendency to follow Central Government Targets rather than the issues impacting on their own communities, even with the advent of PCCs there is very little actual oversight in regards to what local tax payers want from their police to what they actually get. 

One thing I've always liked about the US model is how it is very focused on specific geographical areas with local townships and city halls having real sway on what their departments get up to. Specialised or more state wide areas of law enforcement usually have their own bespoke departments in place to tackle those issues be it highways, environmental, infrastructure, transport etc. 

I do think we can learn a thing or two from it. 

 

 

I agree. 

Perhaps, it is more about who is controlling the force/agency, rather than the agency itself?

Of course, in most US counties, the Sheriff is an elected official, which can bring its own [political] issues!

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