Jump to content
Account Notice
  • To post a recruitment query in the "Recruitment Areas" or in the "Force Specific Areas" you will require a Recruitment Pass or a Membership Package. Click HERE to read more.
  • Your Account Is Currently Limited

Disable-Adblock.png

We have detected that your browser is using AdBlock

Police Community is a not for profit organisation and advertising revenue is key to our continued viability.

Please disable your AdBlocker on our site in order to continue using it.
This message will disappear once AdBlock has been disabled.

Thank you for your support - we appreciate it !

If you feel you are getting this message in error please email support@policecommunity.co.uk

Sign in to follow this  
Chief Bakes

BBC: Hospital operations for child teeth removal increase in England

Recommended Posts

Chief Bakes

Hospital operations for child teeth removal increase in England

  • 13 January 2018
Boy having dental check-upImage copyright napatcha/Getty

Dentists have accused the government of having a "short-sighted" approach to tooth decay in England after hospital operations to remove children's teeth increased to nearly 43,000.

There were 42,911 operations in 2016-17 - up from 40,800 the previous year and 36,833 in 2012-13, NHS figures show.

The British Dental Association said England had a "second-class" dental service compared to Wales and Scotland.

The government said it was "determined" to reduce the number of extractions.

Doctors said many of the tooth extractions would be caused by the food and drink children consume and were therefore "completely preventable".

'Startling' figures

An analysis of NHS figures by the Local Government Association, which represents councils in England and Wales, found the equivalent of 170 hospital tooth extractions a day were being carried out on under-18s.

These are done under general anaesthetic, rather than by a dentist.

The operations would have cost the NHS about £36m last year and £165m since 2012, the LGA found.

Mick Armstrong, chairman of the BDA, said: "These statistics are a badge of dishonour for health ministers, who have failed to confront a wholly preventable disease.

"Tooth decay is the number one reason for child hospital admissions, but communities across England have been left hamstrung without resources or leadership."

The BDA said England was receiving a "second-class service" because, unlike Wales and Scotland, it has no dedicated national child oral health programme.

It said the government's centrepiece policy Starting Well - aimed at improving oral health outcomes for "high-risk" children - had received no new funding and was operating in parts of just 13 local authorities in England.

"The BDA has insisted that national authorities must provide resources to enable all children in England to benefit," it said.


Hospital tooth extractions for under-18s in England:

  • 2016-17: 42,911
  • 2015-16: 40,800
  • 2014-15: 40,970
  • 2013-14: 39,175
  • 2012-13: 36,833

'Cutting back'

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health said the figures were "startling" and "should act as a wake-up call to policy makers and act as the catalyst for change".

The LGA, which represents councils in England and Wales, said the data demonstrated the "urgent need to introduce measures to curb our sugar addiction which is causing children's teeth to rot".

The Royal College of Surgeons said the statistics were "alarming" and called for supervised tooth brushing sessions in all nursery schools across England.

A Department of Health and Social Care spokeswoman said it was "determined to reduce the number of children having teeth extracted because of tooth decay" and pointed to its sugar tax, which comes into effect in April on soft drinks with the most added sugar.

"Our world-class NHS dentists are also playing a vital role to improve dental hygiene - in the last year 6.8 million children were seen by a dentist, representing 58.5% of the child population," she said.

The spokesman added that the Starting Well programme was introduced last year to improve the oral health of children most at risk in 13 high priority areas and NHS England was planning to expand the programme to other areas.

Dr Sandra White, director of dental public health at Public Health England, said parents could reduce tooth decay through cutting back on their children's sugary food and drink and encouraging them to brush their teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice a day, as well as regular trips to the dentist.

A debate on children's dental examinations and treatment is due to take place in the House of Lords on 18 January.

Follow Alex on Twitter.

View the full article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Member Achievements


David
Quote

Dentists have accused the government of having a "short-sighted" approach to tooth decay in England after hospital operations to remove children's teeth increased to nearly 43,000.

Not the parents then?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Member Achievements

Indiana Jones

58.5% of the child population!?!?

It ought to be nearer to 80% or 90%. Essentially ignoring those children too young to have teeth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Member Achievements

obsidian_eclipse

I remember having to visit an address quite late one evening and of course, all the kids in the house got up because the police were there. A few aged 3-11. The method to get them back to bed involved the parent sending them back upstairs with bags of malteasers, coke and crisps. Even getting the older kid to make a bottle with coke in it for the youngest.

I have a thing about teeth. All I could think about that night were teeth coated in a glue of chocolate, starch and sugar. Rotting away in their heads.

My parents would only let us have sweet things in the day so long as we ate our dinner. Certainly not in bed and not in those sorts of quantities either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Member Achievements

Mac7

If you children are having their teeth extracted due to poor hygiene, sugar etc then you have failed as a parent. Typical British society - it must be someone else’s fault.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Member Achievements

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

About us

Police Community was originally founded in 2014 by two serving Police Officers.

In 2016 it was incorporated as a limited company called RAW Digital Media Limited and then purchased 3 other forums; Police Specials, UK Police Online and Police UK to form the largest policing discussion forum network in the UK.

Get in touch

  • 20-22 Wenlock Road, London N1 7GU
  • contact@rawdigitalmedia.co.uk
  • 0844 357 0111
  • Forums In Our Group - Police.Community - UKPoliceOnline.CO.UK - PoliceSpecials.COM - PoliceUK.COM

Twitter

Facebook

    Meet The Team

  • Chief Bakes
    Chief Bakes Management
  • Chief Rat
    Chief Rat Management
  • Chief Cheetah
    Chief Cheetah Management
  • Rocket
    Rocket Global Moderators
  • David
    David Global Moderators
  • Fedster
    Fedster Global Moderators
  • Devil
    Devil Global Moderators
  • MindTheGap
    MindTheGap Global Moderators
  • Techie1
    Techie1 Global Moderators
  • Sir Penguin
    Sir Penguin Global Moderators
  • XA84
    XA84 Global Moderators
  • Remmy
    Remmy Global Moderators
  • PCW
    PCW Global Moderators
  • blakey
    blakey Global Moderators
  • job_done
    job_done Global Moderators
  • Hoofing
    Hoofing Global Moderators
×