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Acting Off Duty


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Javissdaviss

Good Afternoon Ladies and Gents, 

 

Recently saw a topic on acting off duty, it got me wondering... 

When an officer acts off duty, how do you call for help from your colleagues if needed? Is the fastest route still 999?

Does this impact your decision to step in? 

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Be a professional witness, not a professional victim, unless you really need to go hands on and get involved. Clearly 999 is going to be the quickest way to get people to you, without PPE and an

@Javissdaviss * Thats a sixty four dollar question if ever I heard one, but its a good one . A long  time ago in the eighties sometime we had a special who was in a similar predicament. He was in

That isn’t the policy for all forces. Met and City can carry baton and cuffs to/from work.    Cuffs are widely available and anyone can carry them in any case. I’m not sure why so many people t

Jeebs

Be a professional witness, not a professional victim, unless you really need to go hands on and get involved.

Clearly 999 is going to be the quickest way to get people to you, without PPE and an airwave. 

The international disco pass isn’t some sort of magic piece of plastic that is going to stop you getting battered sadly. Even the uniform isn’t enough to prevent that anymore.

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17 hours ago, Javissdaviss said:

Good Afternoon Ladies and Gents, 

 

Recently saw a topic on acting off duty, it got me wondering... 

When an officer acts off duty, how do you call for help from your colleagues if needed? Is the fastest route still 999?

Does this impact your decision to step in? 

@Jeebs +has pretty much hit the nail on the head with their response. 

I recall a colleague who was a special and he came across a fight whilst on a night out, 4 blokes knocking the seven bells out of each other. Colleague phones 999 before stepping in and then when he did all 4 blokes turned on him and forgot about their grievances with each other. Thankfully for special there were a couple of bobby's around the corner who very quickly stepped in and got the incident under control. 

Back in my call taking days we would regularly get 999 calls from officers who were starting or finishing their shifts who had witnessed crimes and thought it best to call us. Most common was OPL's. 

Best advice is don't get involved, just ring 999 and be the witness to the incident not the hero. 

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Javissdaviss

Thank you both for your replies. 

Another officer on here alluded to him having another number to call in thisnsltype of situation which usually had a faster response than 999. Assumed perhaps he had a direct number to his local control. 

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There is the possibility that they had the number to their NPT/Response office however I'd always steer clear of that as if anything happens you don't have an audit trail to go by. By phoning 999 it will be logged on a force system meaning should anything go south you can say you did the correct thing in line with force policies and procedures. 

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Zulu 22

Your only communication would be 999. It is one of those things that when something happens you respond automatically, it is in the genes of every conscientious Police Officer, we act first to protect others and their property.

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Richhamdo

@Javissdaviss * Thats a sixty four dollar question if ever I heard one, but its a good one .

A long  time ago in the eighties sometime we had a special who was in a similar predicament. He was in his garden doing a bit of weeding when a group of youths ran into the road outside his house and started fighting .He stopped what he was doing and went to try to restore the peace as best he could . 

He told them straight away that he was a special constable,  presumably hoping that telling them that would carry a bit more sway.   Unfortunately he was assaulted and was off work for quite some time.

To cut a long story short  he initially had some difficulty  getting compensation for loss of wages from the force. After  it was looked into by someone  that he had declared himself to be a special constable from the very outset there was no further problem. He was actually very well looked after by the force for quite some time, i was his section officer at the time  so i heard all about it from him,  i knew him very well actually and was one of our very best specials.

I heard much later that had he not said/told them initially that he was a “special constable” he would have received nothing. I have no idea whether or not that situation still exists today  in force policy

Talking about “policy” obviously  there was no National Decision Model [N.D.M ] as such to follow then and  written down in every particular detail with the code of ethics/human rights  etc,etc, as it is today, we just assessed the situation  usually in seconds when we were there or from info given from the control room or other officers who offered info over the radio. 

I am retired now after a number of years in the specials, had i been in his situation i would like to think i would have done the same thing but keeping myself at six feet or a least arms length as a minimum from the protagonists so i could bring into play my best cross arm block should i need to. 

If i had passed by on the other side of the road so to speak how could i have shown my face in the police club that night for a pint [smiley face here]

So just for what its worth, my advice would be to sum up the situation by doing a quick NDM if you are unsure.or as that green cartoon character used to sing years ago  “Always let you conscience be your guide”  i always did.  regards, Rich.

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Father Jack

I think Rich summed it up perfectly. Spin the NDM in your head, as you would with any on duty situation, and act accordingly. However, when assessing threat and risk consider that you won't have your vest, radio or appointments with you, and the implications of this. 

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Zulu 22

I would not blame any Special for walking away, depending on the circumstances of course. However, as a Regular if I ignored a situation and took no action I would never be able to face any of my fellow officers again. It is one of those things, as I have said in a previous comment, that you act instinctively. I have done it several times and never regretted it.

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Zulu 22
20 minutes ago, Wilts20 said:

This topic may be of related interest to the the OP

 

You should not be carrying anything when off duty. Your equipment should be secure in your locker.

That does not stop the automatic response kicking off when you are off duty.

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2 hours ago, Zulu 22 said:

You should not be carrying anything when off duty. Your equipment should be secure in your locker.

That does not stop the automatic response kicking off when you are off duty.

*Except Northern Ireland ... for obvious reasons.

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15 hours ago, Zulu 22 said:

You should not be carrying anything when off duty

That isn’t the policy for all forces. Met and City can carry baton and cuffs to/from work. 
 

Cuffs are widely available and anyone can carry them in any case. I’m not sure why so many people think they’re for on duty Police. Baffles me. 

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8 hours ago, BizzieBee said:

That isn’t the policy for all forces. Met and City can carry baton and cuffs to/from work. 
 

Cuffs are widely available and anyone can carry them in any case. I’m not sure why so many people think they’re for on duty Police. Baffles me. 

Whilst you’re right, it’s pretty common for carrying to/ from work, many see that as effectively “at work”.  However, in context, most people see off duty as a trip to the supermarket, cinema etc.   

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9 hours ago, BizzieBee said:

That isn’t the policy for all forces. Met and City can carry baton and cuffs to/from work. 
 

Cuffs are widely available and anyone can carry them in any case. I’m not sure why so many people think they’re for on duty Police. Baffles me. 

Sounds very sensible, similar to what the Euros and US do.

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