Jump to content
×
×
  • Create New...

EPIC - ‘Ethical Policing is Courageous’


Recommended Posts

Wilts20

In the US recently, LEOs (law enforcement officers), are using a code word to tell each other when they are going a bit far.

E.g. One LEO talks with a crook and is getting too emotionally involved, so the other LEO says ‘EPIC’ and then his partner backs off and takes a breather.

This is quite an interesting time for international policing, particularly in the States, where it can be ‘them and us’, as it demonstrates to me, the idea that sometimes LEOs may enflame a situation more. At least that’s how I understand it.

Is there any similar programme in the UK?

Is it another sign that robust policing is under threat, due to the necessary protection of civil liberties? Or is it ensuring professional behaviour at all times by all LEOs? 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Methodical

I'm not aware of any such approach of using a specific phrase to challenge inappropriate behaviour in the UK. 

In the UK we have the Code of Ethics and through the National Decision Model (attached) everything you do is supposed to be by reference to the Code (which encompasses treating people fairly, with respect, etc.)

If an officer wasn't acting in accordance with the Code, then it would be for colleagues to intervene as they felt appropriate.

There is always a balance between treating a member of the public with courtesy, but knowing when enough is enough and appropriate use of policing powers is necessary. In my experience, most officers get that balance about right. Most officers I come across would prefer to de-escalate conflict and have a reasonable chat rather than escalate matters. But of course, sometimes members of the public don't act reasonably and sometimes it is necessary for officers to intervene quickly to keep people safe. This can sometimes look aggressive, but ultimately it is for the officers at the scene to use their judgement and decide. 

NEW-National-decision-model1.png

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
BlueBob

When you are working with another partner/colleague and they start to get too involved, sometimes emotions get raised, then its simply a case of communicating and as likely it would be where the other officer would take over. 
US policing is great for some things, but communications can be a bit short in that regard...... try approaching a US patrol car and asking for a phot and see what can happen!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
Radman
On 06/10/2020 at 19:26, BlueBob said:

try approaching a US patrol car and asking for a phot and see what can happen!

To be fair to our American cousins try doing that anywhere else outside of the UK and you'd get a similar reaction.

Two Spanish Policia Locals on holiday took particular offence to a friend of mine taking a photo of their car. 

I have found US cops to be very accommodating to British police if you're happy to ID yourself. What I will add to this is that in my experience the image of British policing has been somewhat tarnished internationally in recent years where we've gone from friendly, professional custodians of British law and values to an image of authoritarian government led thought police and to be honest the way our government and senior officers have handled certain incidents over the last few years I can understand how that conclusion could be drawn. 

Edited by Radman
Link to post
Share on other sites
Zulu 22

A word should not be necessary. As for the last few years, all you have to do is look at PCC's who are all politically motivated and have brain washed compliant Chief Officers. PCC's were the worst, so called, innovation in Policing.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now