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Found 35 results

  1. Hi All, Im sure most of you are aware that the home office has approved the roll out of the new Taser X2 model which allows for two shots. Ive been looking at Taser international's website (makers of the taser) to learn a bit about the x2, the taser is black in colour on their website and promo video. Does anyone know: When issued to officers here, will the taser be black in colour or will they have it cased in yellow? Just curious to know?
  2. Professionally done if you ask me. Did they have lethal cover? I couldn't see how many were aiming guns and how many were aiming tasers.
  3. Policing Minister says officers will have best and most appropriate technology. Police forces have been given approval to use a new taser model rather than the existing obsolete devices. Policing Minister Brandon Lewis announced today the Home Office has authorised use of the X2 model, which forces can replace their old X26 tasers. He said: “This government is committed to giving the police the tools they need to do their job effectively, and where modern specialist equipment like CEDs [conductive energy devices] are used, to ensure our officers have access to the best and most appropriate technology. “The decision to authorise the taser X2 follows stringent consideration of strategic, ethical, operational and societal issues, including an assessment of environmental factors.” While the X26's work sufficiently, they are no longer manufactured or sold. SACMILL, the scientific advisory body which assessed whether the less lethal weapons should be approved for use, have recommended that body worn video cameras should be worn by all officers using the devices. Matt Spencer, managing director of Taser UK, said: “We are confident that the X2 can help to make police officers more effective at dealing with the increased threat that they face on a daily basis. "More than 20 years of science and research has gone into Taser technology to make the X2 the most proven and most tested less-lethal technology available in the UK. “This announcement demonstrates the important contribution our technology is making to help the police keep the public safe. “With the X2’s improved internal accounting logs and ability to work hand-in-hand with body-worn video it can deliver extra layers of accountability that the public and the police rightly expect and deserve. "We’re proud of how we have adapted and improved our technology to meet the needs of the police and those who hold them to account on behalf of the public." The company has previously said that the X2 has a 25 per cent chance of working as intended first time than the X26. A new data collection system for use for any time “significant force” is used by police is also to be introduced from April. This will mean that forces should publish the ethnicity, age, location and outcome of the individual it is used on. Mr Lewis said: “The information should report on the situations when physical restraint is used, as well as the type of equipment, such as handcuffs, batons, sprays and conductive energy devices.” View on Police Oracle
  4. Looking at many of the threads on the site, the mega changes and difficulties faced by the police service, is it time for a Royal Commission on Policing to have an extensive look at our work, how we are organised, how we protect the public and how we are protected. Money is tight and like most organisations the police need to fin better ways of doing things. I think we need a Royal Commission to independently review policing and perhaps look at the following areas 1. Regionalisation of forces. Although many elements of policing have been amalgamated, can we work more efficiently and bring to bear greater resources by adopting a full regionalisation program, with a minimum force size of 10,000 officers 2. Should the police be routinely armed? If not what proportion should be and whether all officers should be equipped with Taser? 3. PCSO and special constabulary. Should the police service have a paid reserve, similar to what they have in NI. What is the value of having PCSOs, should they be disbanded and resources redirected into regular officer or they be given additional powers and used more effectively. 4. Is there a need for a national motorway policing service, which is also fully armed providing additional ARV responses to forces. 5. Should there be a national infrastructure police service. 6. Should there be a single national uniform/equipment standard with all officer dressed and equipped the same except for insignia 7. Should PCCs be disbanded and replaced with regional bodies to oversee policing 8. How should officers be trained? Do they need a degree or should regionalised training make a return with officers undertaking an intense residential training programmes. 9. What are the merits of a direct entry scheme for Inspector, Superintendent, Chief officer level. 10. What role and function should private specialist forces have in the 21st century, and are there areas which might benefit from an expansion, reducing the pressure on local police forces? 11. Is there a case for amalgamation between police and fire services and other emergency services? These are not necessary my own views but some of the area I think may benefit from having an indepth look at.
  5. Sorry if this has been posted before but i heard it on the radio today Thoughts? Agree? Disagree?
  6. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/04/amber-rudd-taser-police-x2
  7. OK, 2 news articles on this from 2 different sources; And...
  8. Met police accused of abusing black fireman have case to answer, says IPCC   The IPCC has concluded there was evidence the officers racially stereotyped firefighter Edric Kennedy-Macfoy. Photograph: Casey Moore for the Guardian   Six Metropolitan police officers accused of responding to an offer of assistance from an off-duty black firefighter by abusing him, dragging him from his car and shooting him with a Taser should face disciplinary charges for possible racial discrimination, the official watchdog has concluded.   Edric Kennedy-Macfoy has accused police of behaving like wild animals when he approached them in a north London suburb to provide them with a description of a man he spotted throwing a rock at a police van.   After a 20-month investigation into the case, which involved tracking down members of the public who witnessed the incident, the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) concluded there was evidence the officers racially stereotyped the fireman, according to a summary of its key findings in the case, which has been seen by the Guardian.   The IPCC is referring a dossier of evidence to the Crown Prosecution Service after concluding a police constable could also face criminal charges over the use of the Taser. The watchdog also found police failed to act with integrity, courtesy, patience, discretion, professional judgment or common sense.   The most senior-ranking officer among those accused, former inspector David Burgum, denied the charges, questioned the firefighter’s motives and took the unusual step of condemning the statutory watchdog that investigates serious police complaints.   “In my opinion Mr Kennedy-Macfoy has cynically played the race card for his own ends,” Burgum said in a statement to the Guardian. “I do not consider that the IPCC have conducted an independent investigation. They are political organisation with a strong anti-police bias.”   Kennedy-Macfoy was driving through Harrow around 3.30am in September 2011 when he saw a young man hurl the rock at the police van. After noting a description of the young man, Kennedy-Macfoy flagged down the van driver and approached a line of officers to pass the information on.   A disagreement ensued in which, the IPCC said, several officers used abusive language against Kennedy-Macfoy.   The off-duty fireman complained officers repeatedly swore at him, before charging at his car and pulling him from the vehicle.   In an account he gave the Guardian in 2012, Kennedy-Macfoy, then 29, said he responded by calmly and showed his palms to the officers, telling them: “Listen guys, I haven’t done anything wrong. I’m a firefighter – I work with you lot and I just want to explain something.”   He said the Taser was discharged, without warning, when he was walking backwards with his hands in the air.   The final report from the IPCC investigation has not been made public or provided to any of the parties involved.   However, a summary of the IPCC’s key findings, seen by the Guardian, concludes the police’s initial reaction to Kennedy-Macfoy was based purely on his ethnic appearance.   The watchdog’s report names six officers, including Burgum, who it says have a case to answer for gross misconduct in respect of their alleged racial discrimination of Kennedy-Macfoy.   In addition to the ex-inspector, they include a sergeant, three police constables and a special constable. One of the constables - the officer who twice discharged the Taser - could also face criminal charges, the IPCC states.   “The IPCC has completed its investigation into a complaint made by Edric Kennedy- Macfoy relating to his arrest by [Met] officers in September 2011,” a spokesperson for the watchdog said. “The IPCC will be referring a file of evidence to the Crown Prosecution Service for consideration related to an officer’s use of Taser.”   The IPCC did not find sufficient evidence to uphold a complaint against two officers: a seventh officer, of constable rank, who was also present on the night, and a detective inspector who initially handled the fireman’s complaint.   After Kennedy-Macfoy was shot with the Taser, he was arrested and charged with obstructing police. He was found not guilty after a trial at Brent magistrates court.   During those proceedings Burgum gave evidence about the fireman’s racial appearance, which later formed part his complaint. Burgum told the court his officers were in a “stressful” situation and had been dealing with a group of partygoers who had been throwing missiles at them.   According to a court clerk’s notes of proceedings, Burgum added: “I couldn’t say he was anything to do with the party. The party was all black. He was black. He had driven through the cordon. I had to do a quick risk assessment.”   Burgum retired from the Met in January and now works for a private company that has an outsourced contract to train prospective Met police recruits. In his statement to the Guardian, Burgum called the account given by the fireman and apparently supported by the IPCC investigation “implausible in the extreme”.   The ex-inspector is among the four officers the IPCC concluded have additional cases to answer for misconduct on the night – in his case, for swearing at Kennedy-Macfoy.   Burgum said it was ridiculous for the IPCC to raise concern about his abusive language toward fireman because “Mr Kennedy-Macfoy swore at me first”.   “The suggestion that the police reaction to Mr Kennedy-Macfoy was based purely on his ethnic appearance and that the police officers racially stereotyped him is likewise ridiculous,” he said, adding that some of his police colleagues present on the night were “of ethnic minority backgrounds” and they, too, reject the suggestion that this was “a racial incident”.   Given he has retired, Burgum cannot face disciplinary proceedings. However, the other five officers, who all remain at the Met, could be subject to a misconduct hearing. The Met declined to say whether it would hold such a hearing.   “As is normal procedure, we will consider the report’s finding and associated evidence and respond to the IPCC within the statutory 15 working days,” a Met spokesman said.   If the Met decides against holding the hearing, the IPCC has powers to compel the force to do so. Asked if the watchdog planned to use that authority, an IPCC spokesperson said: “We’ll cross that bridge if we come to it.”   Kennedy-Macfoy’s solicitor, Shamik Dutta of the firm Bhatt Murphy, said: “In light of the IPCC’s findings we now look to the CPS and the Met police commissioner to properly consider all the evidence that has been gathered and to make a decision which does justice to that evidence.”   The IPCC and Met have clashed over the Kennedy-Macfoy case before.   His complaint was initially investigated by the Met’s professional standards department, with arm’s-length supervision from the IPCC. That internal inquiry provisionally concluded no police officer should face disciplinary or criminal proceedings.   The IPCC then took the unusual step of rejecting the Met’s inquiry in its entirety, initiating the fully independent investigation. It is that inquiry that, after almost two years collecting and analysing the evidence, concluded six officers have a case to answer for racially-motivated misconduct.   View the full article
  9. http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/psni-justified-in-using-tasers-and-baton-rounds-against-man-armed-with-machete-swords-in-antrim-34562852.html
  10. The United Nations will condemn and publicly shame the Government in May for allowing police to use 50,000-volt stun guns on children, as well as stopping and searching toddlers. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/united-nations-warns-uk-government-to-stop-tasering-children-a6872591.html I'm actually lost for words, especially as the indents used as examples mainly involve knives. Mail glad the UN has solved world hunger, for those wondering she is mentioned...
  11. Tube stabbing 'terrorist incident' Image copyrightPA Image captionA number of people were threatened at the Central Line station A stabbing at a Tube station in east London is being treated as a "terrorist Stabbing at Tube station in east London, in which one man was arrested, treated as 'terrorist incident', police say http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-35018789
  12. A customer has been stabbed to death in a Poundland store in Oxfordshire. Witnesses said a man carrying two knives was Tasered by police after running from the discount shop in Bury Street, Abingdon, at about 11:20 GMT. Staff at a nearby Spar store said they barricaded themselves inside as the man tried to gain entry, before he was restrained by the police. A 36-year-old man, who is from Abingdon, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. Updates on this story and more from Oxfordshire Kash, who works at the Spar shop, said after the stabbing a man tried to push his way into the store. 'Terrible incident' He said: "He approached with two knives in his hands and he tried to enter. He said 'I just want to shake your hand' and we held the door closed. "Then a policewoman caught up with him and Tasered him." Poundland chief executive Jim McCarthy said he was "shocked" that one of the company's customers had been killed. He said: "Our sympathy and thoughts centre on the family of the deceased and of course with other customers and colleagues who were in the store at the time of this terrible incident." Supt Rory Freeman said: "Members of the public will understandably be shocked and upset by this incident today, which has happened in a very public place. "At this stage, this is not being treated as a terrorist incident." A second man nearby suffered a minor injury to his thumb. Thames Valley Police are investigating whether the incidents were connected. Joanna posted on Twitter: "Watching everything that happened today in Abingdon from my office window was terrifying. Rest in Peace." The leader of South Oxfordshire District Council John Cotton said on Twitter it was "dreadful news" and praised the quick response by police. A local trader, who did not want to be named, said: "People are absolutely devastated. Normally it's a very busy vibrant market, but everyone has gone home." BBC: Full story
  13. A man who suffered a cardiac arrest after being Tasered by police has said officers should be banned from using the stun guns after a court ruled he was the victim of excessive force. http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/nov/03/police-taser-victim-calls-for-ban-negligence-ruling-merseyside?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Add_to_Firefox
  14. Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34511532 I find it more disturbing that there are "experts" making the huge leap from looking at contextless figures to these kinds of conclusions seemingly without basis. For these conclusions to have any basis, there has to be an assumption that officers who have been very carefully selected and trained are actively going out on patrol looking for individuals to taser based on nothing more than their race - the fact that each deployment is so heavily scrutinised seems to be lost when these experts make these brash statements... What should be worrying people is that fact that taser has been deployed in these situations when an officer has felt it is required as per their training and national policy. If they are being deployed outside of these and unnecessarily, then I could understand these conclusions. Given anyone can violently attack anyone (including a nine year old boy as either the victim or aggressor), then how can the taser not be justified if the threat was there? Isn't the human right to preserve life is the priority here? More effort should be made to reduce the number of violent situations - I can only assume that it is far easier to blame officers than deal with the real issue of the cause of these violent confrontations in the first place. Note: I present that as my assumption rather than a fact...
  15. A man was shot by police after officers twice used a Taser to try to restrain him, Scotland Yard has said. http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/oct/08/london-police-shoot-man-after-taser-shocks-had-no-effect
  16. I can't help but think if they both went hands on they could've cuffed him just after the second officer arrives.
  17. Three police forces have acknowledged security concerns over their storage of highly sensitive crime videos on computers owned by a private company. Sky News: Full story
  18. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3199575/Grieving-mother-s-plea-Theresa-Robocop-stun-guns.html?ITO=1490&ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490I called the police to calm my son - but he died after they tasered him: Grieving mother's plea to Theresa May over 'Robocop' stun guns Jordon Begley began rowing with neighbours in Manchester over money One neighbour threatened to send five men to beat him up Jordon walked into the kitchen and picked up a vegetable knife His mum, Dot Begley, called the please to intervene in the row One of the police officers fired a nine-second Taser shot at Jordon’s chest Jordon's death is the first recorded killing with a police Taser in Britain By CHRISTINE CHALLAND FOR THE MAIL ON SUNDAY PUBLISHED: 23:46, 15 August 2015 | UPDATED: 02:05, 16 August 2015
  19. Police also agree to pay legal costs in region of £90,000 to John Naylor and Darren Corbridge following August 2010 incident Dorset police are to pay more than £100,000 in compensation and legal costs to two men Tasered and pepper-sprayed by officers at the end of a stag night in Weymouth. Brothers-in-law John Naylor and Darren Corbridge will receive five-figure sums each and the police have agreed to pay legal costs in the region of £90,000 following the incident in August 2010, a lawyer for the men said on Thursday. Naylor, 53, and Corbridge, 40, had been celebrating with groom-to-be Stewart Roberts, who was in fancy dress as a set of male genitalia. They were struggling to get him home at a taxi rank when Corbridge asked police to help. But a fracas broke out between a large group of revellers and several police officers who were on the scene. CCTV of the incident showed a police officer using a stun gun on Corbridge as he lay on the ground as two other police officers looked on. His body can be seen convulsing and flipping over. Naylor was also Tasered in the leg and both men were pepper-sprayed. “The use of Taser was inappropriate,” said Sophie Khan, the lawyer who brought a civil claim against the police on behalf of the two men. “There were officers already there. If they thought they had done something wrong they should have restrained them and taken them into custody. Tasers are supposed to be used in life-threatening situations.” Naylor and Corbridge sued the police for false imprisonment, malicious prosecution, assault and battery, personal injury, excessive use of force and reputation damage, Khan said. The case was due to reach trial in August, but the force settled out of court. A Dorset police spokesperson said: “Dorset police can confirm that an out of court settlement has been reached, with no admittance of liability. It is not our practice to comment on the settlement amount.” Naylor and Corbridge saw their convictions for attacking the police during the incident quashed in 2012. At the time, Corbridge, the owner of a kitchen company and a father of three, told the Dorset Echo: “Whilst I was being Tasered I thought I was going to die. It was the most frightening experience I have had in my life and I will never trust the police again.” Naylor, a mechanic, said: “I’ll never forget being Tasered. Imagine an electric shock and multiply it by 20. It was terrifying.” The settlement follows Theresa May’s decision earlier this month to launch an investigation into the safety of Tasers, which were used 10,062 times across England and Wales in 2014. The home secretary ordered the review of detailed medical evidence about the effect of the devices after the the case of Jordan Begley, 23, whose death was linked to the use of this “less-lethal weapon” by a coroner last month. Scotland Yard deputy assistant commissioner Neil Basu, who leads on less lethal weapons for the National Police Chiefs’ Council, has asked for the detailed medical evidence in the case to be referred to an independent body to “determine if it is necessary to amend their advice of the safety of this weapon”. Children as young as 14 and pensioners as old as 82 have been among those to feel the shock of the Metropolitan police’s X26 Tasers last year. Khan, partner in Sophie Khan & Co which specialises in Taser-related injuries, said the case of Naylor and Corbridge showed that “when you give officers Tasers there is a real risk this will happen to innocent people and there will be an uncontrollable use of force with serious consequences”. http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/jul/16/two-men-tasered-and-pepper-sprayed-by-dorset-police-to-get-100000-payout
  20. stumbled across this taser deployment video earlier from Strood, recorded by a MOP who kindly gives his own commentary... seems like a good deployment from the officers involved!
  21. More recent video of deployment. Good that the uploader included some more context in the video description, not something you see very much in these types of videos: EDIT: Although it does look like an officer gets zapped at about 30 secs
  22. I suspect a lot of you have seen it, but it's the first time I've seen it so I thought I'd share:
  23. Two police officers have been injured - one seriously - in an attack involving "electrical power tools". Devon and Cornwall Police said the men were hurt when they responded to reports of a man making threats to another resident in Kingsbridge, Devon, at about 17:00 BST. A 53-year-old man, named locally as Stephen Yabsley, was arrested on suspicion of assault. Both officers sustained arm injuries and had operations in hospital. _____________ I'll say it before anybody else does; taser. I hope that both officers make a speedy recovery! Source and full article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-32728531
  24. A 73-year-old reserve deputy in Tulsa, Okla., is under investigation after he shot and killed a suspect earlier this month when he mistook his handgun for a Taser, authorities say. But the incident also is gaining national attention because other deputies can be heard on video berating the suspect, Eric Courtney Harris, 44, after he had been shot by Tulsa County Reserve Deputy Robert Bates. The shooting occurred on April 2 in Tulsa during an undercover sting operation. Days earlier, Harris, an accused felon, had sold methamphetamine to an undercover officer, During the sting, he tried to sell an illegal handgun to an undercover officer in a vehicle. As police pulled up on the scene, Harris jumped out of the car and ran. An officer caught up to Harris and Bates arrived moments later. As officers try to restrain Harris, Bates can be heard yelling "Taser" before a shot rings out. Bates then immediately apologizes. "Oh! I shot him! I'm sorry!" Bates can be heard saying on video. "Oh, God. Oh, he shot me," Harris yelled. Harris then complains that he's losing his breath, at which point a deputy can be heard saying "F--- your breath." Harris was taken to a hospital, where he died about an hour after the shooting, CNN reports that Tulsa Police Sgt. Jim Clark, who has been brought in to review the case, said Bates "inadvertently" shot Harris and described Bates' actions as "slip and capture": Quoting Bill Lewinski, executive director of the Force Science Institute, Clark further explained: "These are mistakes that are made when you think you are doing one thing but you actually are doing another, and the result often is directly opposite of what you intended. In effect, your intended behavior slips off the path that you want it to go because it is captured by a stronger response and sent to a different direction." Clark also defended the deputy heard berating Harris, saying that it's likely he didn't hear the gunshot because he was so focused on restraining Harris. He said the deputy thought Harris was out of breath from running. "It is my opinion, after reviewing all the facts and circumstances of this case, [the state's excusable homicide statute] was applicable in this incident," Clark tells the L.A. Times. "Reserve Deputy Bates did not commit a crime. Reserve Deputy Bates was a victim, a true victim, of 'slips and capture.' There's no other determination I could come to." The case has been referred to the Tulsa County District Attorney's Office, which will decide whether to file charges, the Times reports. Harris family said in a statement it doesn't think it's "reasonable" to believe Bates mistook a handgun for a Taser. "We do not believe it is reasonable for a 73-year-old insurance executive to be involved in a dangerous undercover sting operation," the statement says. "... We do not believe it is reasonable - or responsible - for [the sheriff's office] to accept gifts from a wealthy citizen who wants to be [a] 'pay to play' cop." http://www.cleveland.com/nation/index.ssf/2015/04/oklahoma_reserve_deputy_mistak.html