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The Hunted One. Apprehending suspected child groomers


First digital
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These guys are often mistaken for the police by the suspected groomers. This individual actually welcomes police attendance so they can arrest him.  Many videos on their YouTube channel with some arrests and convictions.

Edited by Fedster
Original video removed by the user who uploaded to youtube, new video uploaded which is about the same subject.
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@First digital is this 3 parts? Care to give us a quick review of what happens? 

Do you agree with this kind of investigation by civilians? 

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1 minute ago, Fedster said:

@First digital is this 3 parts? Care to give us a quick review of what happens? 

Do you agree with this kind of investigation by civilians? 

Looks like their team present evidence to the police. The investigation starts there.

Stings like this have led to a suicide (Stinson Hunter) and so did Operation Ore (Police operation).  I don't agree with people dying but equally don't appreciate this type of person being free to groom kids. If you watch this video (2 parts) it comes across as this guy has a rather nasty habit.

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BTP has dealt with a fair few of these types of civilian stings now as very often the meetings take place on railway property - we even have a SOP on it.

I dont overly have a problem with it if I am being honest so long as the people conducting these investigations are willing to help the police fully and turn over all available evidence. Our CID generally keeps these cases on BTP's books aswell (which I find unusual as the attemptef grooming surely took place at a home adress, the rail station is just the end meeting point.)

I am not endorsing these type of vigilante behaviour but it does certainly get results.

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I've not seen the clip, but where vigilantes post their escapades on the net it's prejudicial to the trial process and therefore counterproductive.

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I've not seen the clip, but where vigilantes post their escapades on the net it's prejudicial to the trial process and therefore counterproductive.


They need to be told that by posting the videos prior to trial would prejudice the court case.

I'm sure there is legal recourse for this sort of thing.

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Blimey, this seems like a well-constructed operation. Is that another "team" in the background filming? There seems to be a bloke talking to camera presenter style.

I am still very conflicted as to whether or not I agree with vigilantes taking the law into their own hands. Their evidence gathering techniques can really muddy the investigation when the police come to take over and can lead to inconsistencies for the defence to pick at when the case is brought to trial (if it ever makes it that far to begin with).

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If they follow rules of evidence, don't use unlawful violence, assist the police fully in the investigation and are willing to give evidence at court then I, personally, don't really have a problem with it. I'm not sure what the official line of the MPS is though.

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Blimey, this seems like a well-constructed operation. Is that another "team" in the background filming? There seems to be a bloke talking to camera presenter style.
I am still very conflicted as to whether or not I agree with vigilantes taking the law into their own hands. Their evidence gathering techniques can really muddy the investigation when the police come to take over and can lead to inconsistencies for the defence to pick at when the case is brought to trial (if it ever makes it that far to begin with).


The fact of the matter is without these groups of people these men would go undetected and many would go on to commit horrific offences against children.

I dont endorse it but I can certainly see the 'good' that comes from it (providing these groups abide by disclosure, evidence ect.)

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18 hours ago, Radman said:

 


The fact of the matter is without these groups of people these men would go undetected and many would go on to commit horrific offences against children.

I dont endorse it but I can certainly see the 'good' that comes from it (providing these groups abide by disclosure, evidence ect.)

Sent from my SM-G920F using the Police Community App
 

 

 

Aye, as I said - as long as they stick to the principles of correct investigation / evidence gathering then really I'm all for it. I guess I'm a bit of a cynic in that I don't totally trust the public not to mess things up :P 

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There's a few uses of the word "vigilante" here, or talk of them taking the law into their own hands - that's not what they're doing, is it? They're not giving the people they catch a hiding but actively seeking to have them prosecuted and in that way they're no more vigilantes than the RSPCA or any other organisation who enforce laws whilst not being a state body. In other threads we complain that the public have become reluctant to challenge unacceptable behaviour and opine that crime is not simply a matter for the police to solve!

If they're not doing it properly because of ignorance of the law, then perhaps we ought to educate them - we will reap the benefits in future after all when they present us with better evidence and this sort of activity may well prevent the people caught from going on to commit serious crimes in future.

On 11 October 2016 at 11:24, First digital said:

Stings like this have led to a suicide (Stinson Hunter) and so did Operation Ore (Police operation)

To put it bluntly, the benefits of living in a lawful society must outweigh the cost of the occasional person topping themselves when they feel the net closing in - we cannot not investigate due to the risk of suicides any more than we can not try people due to the risk of miscarriages of justice. While we should do what we can to identify people who pose a risk to themselves during investigations ultimately if someone has mental capacity then there's little we can do to prevent them committing suicide if they're determined to do so, even when they're remanded in custody. Personally I am in favour of a return to anonymity prior to conviction for sexual offences for a number of reasons, which might reduce some of the stress and trauma on defendants.

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Overall I have no issues with this.

There is a female who has been active in the area I cover fairly recently. She has brought a number of cases to police attention and a number of my colleagues have dealt with her. Unfortunately her behaviour is terrible and I would say her feelings towards the police are almost as negative as the ones towards the people she carries out stings on. Her attitude stinks.

My only real issue with the people that do this is the posting of their stings on social media.

I understand the reasons they do it and the fact they need/wish to draw attention to their cause to secure funding ect.

As much as I am sure they are confident with the evidence they have there should be no posting of videos until such time as the subject of the video is convicted in a court of law.


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