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lolovka

Great Police Force roles in UK

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lolovka

The Special Constabulary is a vital and integral part of delivering safe, satisfied and confident communities. Becoming a Special Constable is not to be taken lightly - being first on the scene of a road traffic accident, delivering unwelcome news, making an arrest or dealing with Friday night revellers takes skill, knowledge and above all, character. Yet teachers, bus drivers, management consultants and postal workers regularly fulfil this vital community service and for no financial gain.

Special Constables work alongside regular officers and Police Community Support Officers (PCSOs), either as an integral part of the Neighbourhood Police Teams (NPTs) or on one of the Divisional Response Teams within Wiltshire.

Whilst on duty, Special Constables have the same powers as regular officers and they are issued with full uniform and the same range of equipment as regular officers.

In time, Special Constables may be able to specialise, for example with the Roads Policing Unit, or seek promotion.

Training is delivered at Police Headquarters in Devizes and in Professional Development Units (PDUs) based on division. The training is duty aided and assisted by tutor constables on the beat. Only when the Special Constable and the Force agree that an individual is ready for independent patrol does a Special Constables probation end.

In return for their commitment, a minimum of 16 hours a month, a Special Constable receives first class training, support and becomes a vital member of the Police family. Special Constables are not paid for their time, however they do receive agreed travelling and out of pocket expenses.

Just like regular officers, Special Constables must undergo a probationary period, and the length of this depends on how much time they can devote to their duties.

As part of a uniformed and publically accountable service, Special Constables must ensure they continue to conduct their lives with integrity and honesty on and off duty. To do otherwise could compromise the integrity of Wiltshire Police and may result in disciplinary action and even dismissal. In the event of an injury whilst on duty, regulations provide statutory cover to compensate a Special Constable.

During the training period, student Special Constables are attested at a special ceremony which means they receive their warrant card, often from the Chief Constable, signed by a magistrate, in front of invited family and friends. It is a very special day for them, their families and indeed the Force.

More information: https://express.candarine.com/campaign/url/forward/88a59f5c481e

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Chief Bakes

A slight technicality with the above is that there is no "Probationary Period" for a special constable. Once they are attested they are classed as fully fledged police officers and are afforded all the protections of the Special Constabulary Act 1965.

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Eebs
33 minutes ago, Chief Bakes said:

A slight technicality with the above is that there is no "Probationary Period" for a special constable. Once they are attested they are classed as fully fledged police officers and are afforded all the protections of the Special Constabulary Act 1965.

I don't know the technicalitys for regulars, they get attested on their first day so do they not have powers of arrest and such from day 1?

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Shmook
2 hours ago, lolovka said:

Whilst on duty, Special Constables have the same powers as regular officers

Special Constable receives first class training, support and becomes a vital member of the Police family.

Just like regular officers, Special Constables must undergo a probationary period, and the length of this depends on how much time they can devote to their duties.

40 minutes ago, Chief Bakes said:

A slight technicality with the above is that there is no "Probationary Period" for a special constable. Once they are attested they are classed as fully fledged police officers and are afforded all the protections of the Special Constabulary Act 1965.

 

Same powers off duty too ;)

As for first-class training, while mine was great, and my apologies to Cheetah for this, it isn't a patch on regs training. My force at least 'learns on the job', and I had 5 weekends worth before I attested. The team were awesome, don't get me wrong, but you're definitely chucked in at the deep end!

Regarding a probationary period, you may be a warranted cop, but I think most forces have this anyway. We can't go out solo for example until out of 'probation', and now don't get a samsung tablet or can drive A-B. So there is a period to prove yourself.

 

apologies for the thread hijack :)

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Indiana Jones
9 hours ago, Eebs said:

I don't know the technicalitys for regulars, they get attested on their first day so do they not have powers of arrest and such from day 1?

I think the point that Chief Bakes was making was around the ability for CCs to get rid of PCs in their probationary period if they fail to meet the grade without having to go through a longer UPP etc process; not anything to do with powers of arrest and attestation.

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Prae
I think the point that Chief Bakes was making was around the ability for CCs to get rid of PCs in their probationary period if they fail to meet the grade without having to go through a longer UPP etc process; not anything to do with powers of arrest and attestation.

... Under regulation 13 of the Police Regulations 2003 for anyone who is interested.

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