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Pretty simple question really.

 

Are stretched tyres legal? You know, the kind that young boys in their mum's cars 'cruise' around McDonalds car parks.

 

 

stretched-tyres.jpg

 

 

Thanks,

 

Sloth

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East Sussex Roads Policing Unit on Facebook posted something about this yesterday, it will not let me copy / paste from my phone but below is a screen capture of their post Sent from my iP

Had some input on a traffic patrol officers course I've just done, and basically they're illegal, ie against construction and use regulations, so in theory if all 4 wheels have stretched tyres on them

Can't speak for other forces, but in Dorset you'd be calling for a traffic unit to get the vehicle prohibited - four tyres, four defects... plus whatever else is wrong with the vehicle!

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IanW

You could also start considering dangerous condition, as this is well out of the spec of the tyre.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Chewie

Not withstanding the fact your car looks ridiculous with tyres like this, they're not legal at all - they tyres won't have been fitted within the manufacturer's specs, so you're looking at Construction and Use Regs 26 & 27... I'd also be considering dangerous condition (S40A RTA).

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cookyy2k

If they don't have rolled arches/arch extenders you can also look for too much tread being visible from above.

 

Incidentally is there anything against ridiculous negative camber? I mean you rarely find it in isolation, usually combined with stretch but there has to be a limit on that too right? I assume at the point it becomes dangerous. I have 1.5on my car which equates to about 5mm between the top and bottom of the tyre and is for handling but some take it way too far:

 

demon_camber_oni_kyan.flv7_.jpg

 

vw-golf-r32-mk5-purple-ccw-gold-3.jpg

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Mikeh2000

Had some input on a traffic patrol officers course I've just done, and basically they're illegal, ie against construction and use regulations, so in theory if all 4 wheels have stretched tyres on them, at 3 points each, you could potentially lose your licence under the totting up procedure.

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LosingGrip

Not withstanding the fact your car looks ridiculous with tyres like this, they're not legal at all - they tyres won't have been fitted within the manufacturer's specs, so you're looking at Construction and Use Regs 26 & 27... I'd also be considering dangerous condition (S40A RTA).

 

Is this something we (as Specials) can deal with?  Not really seen it been mentioned before.

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Chewie

Is this something we (as Specials) can deal with?  Not really seen it been mentioned before.

 

Can't speak for other forces, but in Dorset you'd be calling for a traffic unit to get the vehicle prohibited - four tyres, four defects... plus whatever else is wrong with the vehicle! ;)

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Chewie

If they don't have rolled arches/arch extenders you can also look for too much tread being visible from above.

 

Incidentally is there anything against ridiculous negative camber? I mean you rarely find it in isolation, usually combined with stretch but there has to be a limit on that too right? I assume at the point it becomes dangerous. I have 1.5on my car which equates to about 5mm between the top and bottom of the tyre and is for handling but some take it way too far:

 

Again, Construction and Use Regs and 40A RTA come into play.

 

The camber shown in the pictures you've posted is absolutely ridiculous... anyone who thinks their car is safe to be driven like that doesn't deserve their licence (which is good, because they probably won't have it for long).

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cookyy2k

Again, Construction and Use Regs and 40A RTA come into play.

 

The camber shown in the pictures you've posted is absolutely ridiculous... anyone who thinks their car is safe to be driven like that doesn't deserve their licence (which is good, because they probably won't have it for long).

 

Totally agree about how stupid it is, becoming the in thing along with ridiculous stretch as seen in the first post.

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Dave the minion

Where does the evidence of danger come from though? Would a statement from the manufacturers be required?

I can't see a magistrates court convicting just because a PC says so.

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IanW

East Sussex Roads Policing Unit on Facebook posted something about this yesterday, it will not let me copy / paste from my phone but below is a screen capture of their post

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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BlueBob

Where does the evidence of danger come from though? Would a statement from the manufacturers be required?

I can't see a magistrates court convicting just because a PC says so.

The extract above from Sussex Police is fairly handy.  It does not outright say they are an offence, but may be.  It would be for the officer to explain how and why they fail to be acceptable and not just because they are mixed sizes.  The C&U regs make no comment about complying with manufacturers specification, so if that is used as a basis then again the officer would need to explain how and why the fitment does not comply. 

The Tyre Association is quite bland and includes the words 'could' lead to premature tyre failure.  Again these are aspects that the officer needs to explain. IMO if one was to quote the BS standard then you can be fairly sure that you would need to understand what it means and prepared to answer questions on it. 

IMHO, tyres are possibly the easiest and yet most complex of the C&U offences.  Whilst they often seem easy to evidence, there are lots of nuances that have to be overcome to be succesful not only at the basic driver opting to plead guilty, or a 'quick' visit through the Mags Court but also when it is revisited with gusto on appeal. 

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Chewie

Tyres are marked on their sidewalls with information regarding their use, including the wheel rim diameter and tyre height & width... if the wheel to which they're fitted is a different diameter, or the actual tyre height/width is different to that shown on the wall of the tyre (which it will be in these cases), then you've got your evidence to show that the tyres are being used outside of their recommended operating parameters.  
 

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BlueBob

Tyres are marked on their sidewalls with information regarding their use, including the wheel rim diameter and tyre height & width... if the wheel to which they're fitted is a different diameter, or the actual tyre height/width is different to that shown on the wall of the tyre (which it will be in these cases), then you've got your evidence to show that the tyres are being used outside of their recommended operating parameters.

And yet even the manufacturers allow different tyre sizes on the same rims! Most typically the aspect ratio varies with no issues.
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