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OscarWhiskeyEchoNovember

Cadets honing their 'policing' skills

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OscarWhiskeyEchoNovember

here is a article i saw, it is cadets helping store security(not knowing there would be a shoplifter (staged) and they ran to stop him in a bid to hone their skills that they had learnt.

 

 

 

KINGSBRIDGE police cadets have been busy recently helping to ‘apprehend’ a shop-lifter, raising awareness of bad driving and being presented with cheques. 
If you were in Tesco last Thursday, you may have seen the police cadets dealing with a shoplifter – but all was not as it seemed. 
Around a dozen cadets were in Tesco in Kingsbridge to see how the security works in a busy supermarket. They were inspecting the CCTV monitors when they saw a man open a backpack, pull an armful of deodorant spray off the shelf and try to make a run for it. 
This is when the cadets sprang into action, stopping him leaving and taking his details. They then escorted him to the police van outside and searched his bag, cataloguing the evidence as they went. 
It was only when they looked to PCSO Paul O’Dwyer to have the man arrested that he gave them the full story – it was a set-up. 
The man they had detained was coastguard rescue officer Tim Page, who was in on the plot, as were the Tesco staff. 
It was an exercise designed to allow the cadets to try out the skills they had learnt and give them a ‘real-life’ scenario. 
Sue Durant, community champion at Tesco, said: ‘It was great to support the police cadets with their training by allowing them to put their new skills into practice within a live environment like our store here in Kingsbridge. 
‘The cadets were very professional and the future of policing is safe from what was seen tonight.’ 
Part-time baddie Tim Page said: ‘Being offered the opportunity to act the criminal was fantastic, yet daunting when faced with 25 eagle-eyed, trained police cadets. 
‘The cadets were quick to apprehend me and showed real ­confidence and police decision-making. 
‘Be aware, this lot are made of tough stuff and should be really proud of their abilities and training. They’re brilliant ambassadors for the police service and the local Kingsbridge community.’ 
The cadets were also on hand with animal masks to help officers inform the public about the Honest Truth Campaign at the Kingsbridge Motor Show last week. 
They were helping to raise the profile of the campaign, which is designed to reduce antisocial driving and deaths on our roads. 
The campaign is ­centred around using animals to highlight the different dangerous driving that can be seen on public highways. 
A cheetah represents speeders; a chameleon drug drivers; a parrot is for talking on a mobile phone; a peacock represents those who show off to friends in the car; a bulldog is for drink drivers; a chimpanzee distracted drivers; a donkey no insurance; and rhino is for people who do not wear ­seatbelts. 
Community cadet leader PCSO O’Dwyer said: ‘The Honest Truth Campaign car was well-visited throughout the day and the cadets were able to pass on vital information to members of the public.’ 
The cadets were also handed a cheque for £100 from Kingsbridge Rotary Club by incoming president Phyllis Angliss. 
‘It was in recognition of the work they did for us during Kingsbridge Celebrates Christmas,’ she said. ‘I think they’ve used the funds to buy utility belts for the new cadets. They’ve done a lot of good.’ 
The Hope Cove Weekend committee have also donated four new utility belts to the cadets to allow them to carry vital equipment such as their pocket note books, radios and even their personal first aid kits. 
The new recruits will be qualified for this year’s Hope Cove Weekend, where they will be in attendance helping the committee ensure the smooth running of the event. The committee donates to several organisations and charities across the area, including the Hope Cove Lifeboat.                                                                                                  

  Link: http://www.kingsbridge-today.co.uk/News.cfm?id=26103&headline=Hope%20Cove%20crew%20supports%20police%20cadets

 

Anyone agree with this or are like me and see concerns about this? as i believe it many make some cadets believe they can be in a confrontational role like this?

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Hampshire-999

I totally agree with this, it's great that they did a set-up to see what cadets would do in this sort of situation. I can tell you right now, if I see someone robbing a store when I'm on duty as a cadet or I'm just in the store buying a packet of walkers. I am giving pursuit, he/she is not getting away with it. I have this strong view after I had to witness two blokes rob from a co-operative, I was so young I could not do anything about it. But now I'm old enough to be able to think for myself and run after a criminal. All in all, if someone wants to rob a store you better think twice when I'm around.

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PoliceDoge

I'm not sure how I feel about this. On the one hand, if they had learned about powers of arrest, then a controlled scenario such as this is a good way of testing their training out.

On the other hand, I wasn't aware cadets had powers to search. I would also hope that cadets are given a stab vest and would have the full backing of the force if they were to effect an arrest - given how they've seemingly been trained to do so.

Edited by PoliceDoge

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Growley

I totally agree with this, it's great that they did a set-up to see what cadets would do in this sort of situation. I can tell you right now, if I see someone robbing a store when I'm on duty as a cadet or I'm just in the store buying a packet of walkers. I am giving pursuit, he/she is not getting away with it. I have this strong view after I had to witness two blokes rob from a co-operative, I was so young I could not do anything about it. But now I'm old enough to be able to think for myself and run after a criminal. All in all, if someone wants to rob a store you better think twice when I'm around.

 

And if you're on duty and receive a shoeing the officer supervising you will probably get in a world of trouble. The attitude you're taking is not a mature one.

 

Police Cadets are not police officers. They are children who shouldn't be put in a confrontational role.

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stoppedreality

I'm all for things like this, where cadets are given the chance to exercise their training.

 

HOWEVER...

 

I totally agree with this, it's great that they did a set-up to see what cadets would do in this sort of situation. I can tell you right now, if I see someone robbing a store when I'm on duty as a cadet or I'm just in the store buying a packet of walkers. I am giving pursuit, he/she is not getting away with it. I have this strong view after I had to witness two blokes rob from a co-operative, I was so young I could not do anything about it. But now I'm old enough to be able to think for myself and run after a criminal. All in all, if someone wants to rob a store you better think twice when I'm around.

 

I'm pretty sure most police officers on this forum wouldn't go running after a shoplifter. If they're detained and kicking off, then maybe yes we'll step in. But if they've nicked £30 worth of meat and legged it, then there's really no point in risking your health, your job or your safety giving chase. It's even more dangerous for a cadet to do it.

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Klaus

now I'm old enough to be able to think for myself and run after a criminal. All in all, if someone wants to rob a store you better think twice when I'm around.

How old are you again?

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Funkywingnut

I totally agree with this, it's great that they did a set-up to see what cadets would do in this sort of situation. I can tell you right now, if I see someone robbing a store when I'm on duty as a cadet or I'm just in the store buying a packet of walkers. I am giving pursuit, he/she is not getting away with it. I have this strong view after I had to witness two blokes rob from a co-operative, I was so young I could not do anything about it. But now I'm old enough to be able to think for myself and run after a criminal. All in all, if someone wants to rob a store you better think twice when I'm around.

You are aware you are in no way a police officer ?

You are just another member of the public,

Goes to show a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, plenty of police will admit they were gung ho when they first joined, but police training in no way prepares you for actual violence.

I will say I support your morale courage tho

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Hampshire-999

You are aware you are in no way a police officer ?

You are just another member of the public,

Goes to show a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, plenty of police will admit they were gung ho when they first joined, but police training in no way prepares you for actual violence.

I will say I support your morale courage tho

Yes I'm aware I'm not a police officer, but not being one will not change my opinion in wanting to stop a robber.

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Burnsy2023

And if you're on duty and receive a shoeing the officer supervising you will probably get in a world of trouble. The attitude you're taking is not a mature one.

 

Indeed, especially in Hampshire where the scheme is relatively new, incidents like this could lead to everything being canned.

 

 

I'm pretty sure most police officers on this forum wouldn't go running after a shoplifter. If they're detained and kicking off, then maybe yes we'll step in. But if they've nicked £30 worth of meat and legged it, then there's really no point in risking your health, your job or your safety giving chase. It's even more dangerous for a cadet to do it.

 
Absolutely.  Cadets should be doing what I'd be doing, being observant to give the best statement when on duty officers arrive.

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Hampshire-999

How old are you again?

(I don't really want to disclose this here)

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Growley

Yes I'm aware I'm not a police officer, but not being one will not change my opinion in wanting to stop a robber.

Are we talking about an actual robber or a shoplifter?

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Shmook

(I don't really want to disclose this here)

It's in your public profile buddy...

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Hampshire-999

It's in your public profile buddy...

Good observant skills

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stoppedreality

Are we talking about an actual robber or a shoplifter?

 

Even with a robbery, I reckon I'd still stick with the Victim, rather than go legging it after the suspect.

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Growley

Even with a robbery, I reckon I'd still stick with the Victim, rather than go legging it after the suspect.

 

I wasn't suggesting it might justify the choice of actions, simply trying to get to the bottom of what the poster was actually saying; although it would seem even more foolhardy for an untrained child to go chasing after somebody who has just shown a willingness to use force.

 

Generally, my rule off-duty is to be a witness and call it in unless somebody is going to be badly hurt by me not physically intervening. I certainly wouldn't be chasing petty shoplifters down the road when I'm not at work.

Edited by Growley
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