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Revealed: LAPD officers told to collect social media data on every civilian they stop


Equin0x
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https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/08/revealed-los-angeles-police-officers-gathering-social-media

The Los Angeles police department (LAPD) has directed its officers to collect the social media information of every civilian they interview, including individuals who are not arrested or accused of a crime, according to records shared with the Guardian.

 

Would that be allowed here, or would there be issues with GDPR or RIPA?

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9 hours ago, Equin0x said:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/sep/08/revealed-los-angeles-police-officers-gathering-social-media

The Los Angeles police department (LAPD) has directed its officers to collect the social media information of every civilian they interview, including individuals who are not arrested or accused of a crime, according to records shared with the Guardian.

 

Would that be allowed here, or would there be issues with GDPR or RIPA?

What’s RIPA about open source information you put in the public domain?

 

Just don’t answer the questions if asked, that’s the simplest way to avoid it. 

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3 hours ago, Ether said:

What’s RIPA about open source information you put in the public domain?

Personally I would have thought the information becomes "fair game" at that point, but did a search for the terms social media and directed surveillance on government websites and I came across this

 

One off visits or infrequent visits to an individual’s Social Media profile spread over time cannot be considered “directed surveillance”for the purposes of RIPA, repeated or frequent visits may cross over into becoming “directed surveillance” requiring RIPA authorisation.A person’s Social Media profile should not, be routinely monitored on a daily or weekly basis in search of updates, as this will require RIPA authorisation.

https://modgov.southsomerset.gov.uk/documents/s19595/9 RIPA Appendix 5 Social Networking in Investigations Policy 2017.pdf

 

So just wondering if police here were told the same as the LAPD would they actually be allowed or would that be the kind of thing requiring RIPA authorisation?

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We are not in America and we do, not make or administer or enforce their laws.

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11 minutes ago, Zulu 22 said:

We are not in America and we do, not make or administer or enforce their laws.

So if officers here were told to "collect social media data on every civilian you stop" would that need RIPA approval? The document I read appears to suggest a difference between a one off viewing of someones page, and regular visits, but not sure why that specific distinction is being drawn.

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1 hour ago, Equin0x said:

So if officers here were told to "collect social media data on every civilian you stop" would that need RIPA approval? The document I read appears to suggest a difference between a one off viewing of someones page, and regular visits, but not sure why that specific distinction is being drawn.

You seem to be mixing up two distinct actions. Collecting social media data is not the same as accessing social media accounts.

Edited by Billy Blue Tac
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1 hour ago, Equin0x said:

So if officers here were told to "collect social media data on every civilian you stop" would that need RIPA approval? The document I read appears to suggest a difference between a one off viewing of someones page, and regular visits, but not sure why that specific distinction is being drawn.

No

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49 minutes ago, Billy Blue Tac said:

You seem to be mixing up two distinct actions. Collecting social media data is not the same as accessing social media accounts.

I'm not talking about any kind of special access the police might be given by the social media company. I'm talking about officers opening up a web browser, going to a suspects social media page, and making a not of any publicly viewable information that might be relevant to an ongoing investigation. The document here https://modgov.southsomerset.gov.uk/documents/s19595/9 RIPA Appendix 5 Social Networking in Investigations Policy 2017.pdf suggests that doing that as a one off wouldn't qualify as directed surveillance, but that doing it repeatedly probably would. I'm not sure what exactly leads to that distinction.

 

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8 minutes ago, Equin0x said:

I'm not talking about any kind of special access the police might be given by the social media company. I'm talking about officers opening up a web browser, going to a suspects social media page, and making a not of any publicly viewable information that might be relevant to an ongoing investigation. The document here https://modgov.southsomerset.gov.uk/documents/s19595/9 RIPA Appendix 5 Social Networking in Investigations Policy 2017.pdf suggests that doing that as a one off wouldn't qualify as directed surveillance, but that doing it repeatedly probably would. I'm not sure what exactly leads to that distinction.

 

 Correct, looking on social media to gather information as part of an investigation is perfectly legal, regularly doing so is surveillance for the purposes of RIPA or IPA as it is now. 

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On 13/09/2021 at 15:37, Equin0x said:

I'm not talking about any kind of special access the police might be given by the social media company. I'm talking about officers opening up a web browser, going to a suspects social media page, and making a not of any publicly viewable information that might be relevant to an ongoing investigation. The document here https://modgov.southsomerset.gov.uk/documents/s19595/9 RIPA Appendix 5 Social Networking in Investigations Policy 2017.pdf suggests that doing that as a one off wouldn't qualify as directed surveillance, but that doing it repeatedly probably would. I'm not sure what exactly leads to that distinction.

 

And I'm talking about the news article you posted in the opening question.

The police were told to "collect the social media information of every civilian they interview" - ie asking a person for their account details during a conversation, not by logging on to t'interweb.

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