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1 hour ago, Zulu 22 said:

I always found that officers were more concerned with PSD conducting the investigation than the IOPC.  They certainly knew that it would be dealt with quicker.  One problem was that because of their Policing Experience they knew when an officer was trying it on, which then could lead to a very awkward question. 

Some people on here actually believe that the Police do not sort out their own bad apples; just the contrary as every Officer despised any of their number who are bent. 

There was an almost irrational fear of PSD in my own force. Even from the enormous majority of officers, who had nothing whatsoever to fear from them. 

Part of this admittedly stemmed from the fact that if a complaint was made against an officer, then their authority to carry firearms would be suspended, whilst the complaint was investigated. Even if exonerated you would inevitably be sidelined for a while. Usually manning a desk in a basement office, somewhere in the bowels of Force HQ. Not a very appealing prospect.

 

Edited by Father Jack
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11 minutes ago, Equin0x said:

How is that a problem? Surely it's a good thing they can spot an officer trying it on.

I do think the police do a good job at sorting out their own bad apples. I've seen officers on here criticize a bent officer in the news and that's reassuring. My concern is more about unconscious bias. The police isn't just a random job, you face things that most people don't and as a result form stronger bonds with your colleagues than two people working in a shop for example. And with those shared experiences comes the potential that in a dispute between an officer and a civilian, you could unconsciously lean more towards favouring the other officer.

Unconscious bias is covered in our initial training. A lot of people do see the world through assumptions and stereotypes, even if they are not necessarily negative ones. We try to spot it in ourselves and others, and not to let it influence our decision making.

As police officers we do form stronger bonds with colleagues because of the nature of our work. On the flip side of that we also hold our colleagues to higher standards than we would a member of the public. This includes challenging inappropriate behaviour, and most certainly corrupt or criminal behaviour.

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42 minutes ago, Father Jack said:

Unconscious bias is covered in our initial training. A lot of people do see the world through assumptions and stereotypes, even if they are not necessarily negative ones. We try to spot it in ourselves and others, and not to let it influence our decision making.

As police officers we do form stronger bonds with colleagues because of the nature of our work. On the flip side of that we also hold our colleagues to higher standards than we would a member of the public. This includes challenging inappropriate behaviour, and most certainly corrupt or criminal behaviour.

Let's say you were investigating an officer for something that was borderline rather than blatantly wrong. They say how stressful the situation was, how they felt rushed into making a snap decision, and you start to feel as though you can relate to them because their situation might be similar to a situation you've faced. Would you ever feel tempted to give them some leeway that you might not give to a civilian who is a complete stranger that you don't relate to?

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18 minutes ago, Equin0x said:

Let's say you were investigating an officer for something that was borderline rather than blatantly wrong. They say how stressful the situation was, how they felt rushed into making a snap decision, and you start to feel as though you can relate to them because their situation might be similar to a situation you've faced. Would you ever feel tempted to give them some leeway that you might not give to a civilian who is a complete stranger that you don't relate to?

Jesus, Mary, Joseph and the Donkey.  You are not listening. If as an Investigating officer you found something that was borderline then it would all be covered in the report of the Investigation. That would include a conclusion and any recommendation, it is then for the higher authority to make the decision.  As a matter of interest in the GMP you were at greater risk from PSD as if they were investigating, say an assault, and found that there was no evidence or the evidence proved a malicious complaint, but they found that you had taken a drink on duty or been late for duty then they would add that investigation.

Police Officers constantly fight Crime and wrong doing. If anything they come down heavily on the transgressors as they have no right to be in the job having abused their position.  It is never a pleasant task dealing with bent officers but it is an essential.  In 30 years I arrested three officers for criminal conduct, it was not pleasant but I never lost sleep over it. Those officers chose their own destruction and betrayed their oath. 

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6 minutes ago, Zulu 22 said:

Police Officers constantly fight Crime and wrong doing. If anything they come down heavily on the transgressors as they have no right to be in the job having abused their position.  It is never a pleasant task dealing with bent officers but it is an essential.  In 30 years I arrested three officers for criminal conduct, it was not pleasant but I never lost sleep over it. Those officers chose their own destruction and betrayed their oath. 

I've seen officers on here criticize a colleague if they've done something wrong and that reassures me a bit.

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7 hours ago, Equin0x said:

How is that a problem? Surely it's a good thing they can spot an officer trying it on.

I do think the police do a good job at sorting out their own bad apples. I've seen officers on here criticize a bent officer in the news and that's reassuring. My concern is more about unconscious bias. The police isn't just a random job, you face things that most people don't and as a result form stronger bonds with your colleagues than two people working in a shop for example. And with those shared experiences comes the potential that in a dispute between an officer and a civilian, you could unconsciously lean more towards favouring the other officer.

Unconscious bias is mostly nonsense and when you are professional and objective it doesn’t feature 

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5 hours ago, Equin0x said:

Let's say you were investigating an officer for something that was borderline rather than blatantly wrong. They say how stressful the situation was, how they felt rushed into making a snap decision, and you start to feel as though you can relate to them because their situation might be similar to a situation you've faced. Would you ever feel tempted to give them some leeway that you might not give to a civilian who is a complete stranger that you don't relate to?

Irrelevant if you are professional, anyone can favour someone body, being a police officer means you are less likely to be that way in my experience 

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5 hours ago, Equin0x said:

I've seen officers on here criticize a colleague if they've done something wrong and that reassures me a bit.

Good cops despise bad cops, most cops are good cops.

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13 hours ago, Ether said:

Unconscious bias is mostly nonsense and when you are professional and objective it doesn’t feature 

If you’re human you have unconscious bias. If you are aware of that you can deal with the bias, if you are not aware, or deny it exists, then your bias comes out - unconsciously. 

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