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Emergency Vehicle markings regulations


The Greater Good

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The Greater Good

I heard a few months ago that the regulations affecting what vehicles can use Battenburg were changing, just seen the attached RAF Bomb disposal have had to get rid of the blue on their vehicles. I don't think this applies to RAF Police, Royal Military Police or RN Police as I believe there is an agreement with the Home Office on use.

To be honest, there isn't a lot online. I did hear that the regulations also affect Ambulances and that only NHS Ambulances will be allowed to have Green/Yellow Battenburg, but it will only apply to new vehicles (as I said that is hearsay at the moment). The local NHS Ambulances trust used to have CFR's running about in Battenburg liveried cars but these have been changed to white cars with a yellow stripe (similar to highway maintenance vehicles) as they probably don't qualify as an Emergency vehicle.

I would be interested if anyone has knowledge of this or suitable links.

 

RAF Bomb Disposal 2.jpg

RAF Bomb Disposal 1.jpg

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Ether
1 hour ago, The Greater Good said:

I heard a few months ago that the regulations affecting what vehicles can use Battenburg were changing, just seen the attached RAF Bomb disposal have had to get rid of the blue on their vehicles. I don't think this applies to RAF Police, Royal Military Police or RN Police as I believe there is an agreement with the Home Office on use.

To be honest, there isn't a lot online. I did hear that the regulations also affect Ambulances and that only NHS Ambulances will be allowed to have Green/Yellow Battenburg, but it will only apply to new vehicles (as I said that is hearsay at the moment). The local NHS Ambulances trust used to have CFR's running about in Battenburg liveried cars but these have been changed to white cars with a yellow stripe (similar to highway maintenance vehicles) as they probably don't qualify as an Emergency vehicle.

I would be interested if anyone has knowledge of this or suitable links.

 

RAF Bomb Disposal 2.jpg

RAF Bomb Disposal 1.jpg

All branches of the military police are recognised as police, so there are no legal restrictions for vehicle markings/lights. 

There is an ACPO (I think) response to this via an FOI pertaining to the use of lights. 

Traditionally EOD never had batternburg vehicles, probably only came about when ordering new vehicles. 

Edited by Funkywingnut
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BlueBob

Just remember that each of those 'ever' services will make the decisions for themselves with no likelihood of changes to either the legislation or its application.  Its less to do with the battengurg shapes ( Unless they have been trade marked) and more to do with colours used.  When you consider why they are used - primarily for safety whilst stopped rather than to make progress through traffic, then the use and neccesity of them is reduced.  It could be said that the use and frequency of their use on vehicles tangental to the core emery's vehicles has boomed, rather like the use and abuse of fitment and use of amber flashing lamps - it diminishes the value of the signage.  
What set of vehicles are you particularly interested in as the OP seems to have covered a lot.  
There have been previous threads which have discussed and defined their usage and fitment - 

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The Greater Good
19 hours ago, Funkywingnut said:

All branches of the military police are recognised as police, so there are no legal restrictions for vehicle markings/lights. 

There is an ACPO (I think) response to this via an FOI pertaining to the use of lights. 

Traditionally EOD never had batternburg vehicles, probably only came about when ordering new vehicles. 

Never seen the FOI tbh, it used to be done on an individual Force basis with the CC permission to use them in his TAOR (aka Police purposes) but I'm more interested in the markings than lights

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The Greater Good
7 hours ago, BlueBob said:

Just remember that each of those 'ever' services will make the decisions for themselves with no likelihood of changes to either the legislation or its application.  Its less to do with the battengurg shapes ( Unless they have been trade marked) and more to do with colours used.  When you consider why they are used - primarily for safety whilst stopped rather than to make progress through traffic, then the use and neccesity of them is reduced.  It could be said that the use and frequency of their use on vehicles tangental to the core emery's vehicles has boomed, rather like the use and abuse of fitment and use of amber flashing lamps - it diminishes the value of the signage.  
What set of vehicles are you particularly interested in as the OP seems to have covered a lot.  
There have been previous threads which have discussed and defined their usage and fitment - 

Was originally Ambulances, but this has now been answered as I've now seen the DoT Memo which is hard to find because it is still listed as 2009 as it is only an amendment. (updated) http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/3221/pdfs/uksiem_20093221_en.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1hmtyPkg2gsSxPumnNVwIYtZC5KN1vfxCISfR12iRIjm0TZM4P3PjyN5M  The Ambulances bit that I mentioned was duff info as there are basically no changes.  The other vehicles were Military Police (being an ex has been) and also Mountain Rescue Teams which fair enough are mentioned in the use of lights but nothing mentioned about the MRT Battenburg with is Orange and white. Actually looking at lights for MRT's it is all very well allowing only an ambulance to exceed speed restrictions but when you need to get a team out on the hill fast then it would have probably been sensible to give personnel carriers, comms and search dog vehicles the same exemptions? I've noticed that Coastguard and Immigration are not mentioned as regards to markings

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Ether
1 hour ago, The Greater Good said:

Never seen the FOI tbh, it used to be done on an individual Force basis with the CC permission to use them in his TAOR (aka Police purposes) but I'm more interested in the markings than lights

The regs doesn’t give the CC the power to give that authority as far as I can see. The term emergency vehicle or for police purpose, so it would apply to the military police the same as a constabulary.

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BlueBob
16 hours ago, The Greater Good said:

Was originally Ambulances, but this has now been answered as I've now seen the DoT Memo which is hard to find because it is still listed as 2009 as it is only an amendment. (updated) http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2009/3221/pdfs/uksiem_20093221_en.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1hmtyPkg2gsSxPumnNVwIYtZC5KN1vfxCISfR12iRIjm0TZM4P3PjyN5M  The Ambulances bit that I mentioned was duff info as there are basically no changes.  The other vehicles were Military Police (being an ex has been) and also Mountain Rescue Teams which fair enough are mentioned in the use of lights but nothing mentioned about the MRT Battenburg with is Orange and white. Actually looking at lights for MRT's it is all very well allowing only an ambulance to exceed speed restrictions but when you need to get a team out on the hill fast then it would have probably been sensible to give personnel carriers, comms and search dog vehicles the same exemptions? I've noticed that Coastguard and Immigration are not mentioned as regards to markings

Mentioning speed exemptions, you obviously recall that if and when the Road Safety Act comes in, that exemption is further reduced to include appropriate training - so your exampled MRT are likely to be further displaced from an exemption.   Fitment of lights has nothing to do with exemption from speed limits.  Lookingonly at making progress / exemption from speed limits, the use of warning lights is a bit of a waste as it gives no greater exemption that not having them fitted, rather, their use can place a unreasonable stress and hassle upon the driver.
For the coastguard/immigration, as you infer, if they are not mentioned in the exemptions, tend they walnut be exempt. Exempt being that they would be permitted to use the markings.   

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The Greater Good
On 11/01/2019 at 10:46, BlueBob said:

Mentioning speed exemptions, you obviously recall that if and when the Road Safety Act comes in, that exemption is further reduced to include appropriate training - so your exampled MRT are likely to be further displaced from an exemption.   Fitment of lights has nothing to do with exemption from speed limits.  Lookingonly at making progress / exemption from speed limits, the use of warning lights is a bit of a waste as it gives no greater exemption that not having them fitted, rather, their use can place a unreasonable stress and hassle upon the driver.
For the coastguard/immigration, as you infer, if they are not mentioned in the exemptions, tend they walnut be exempt. Exempt being that they would be permitted to use the markings.   

I think most blue light users have appropriate recognised training these days with a qualified ADI, validated by FutureQuals or similar (that includes Staffordshire CFR's which are the only CFR blue light users and one of the Blood Bike groups). http://www.emergencyresponsedrivertraining.co.uk/level-3-emergency-ambulance-driving/   Note: you can only access these courses if you are from a legitimate blue light organisation!

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BlueBob
5 hours ago, The Greater Good said:

I think most blue light users have appropriate recognised training these days with a qualified ADI, validated by FutureQuals or similar (that includes Staffordshire CFR's which are the only CFR blue light users and one of the Blood Bike groups). http://www.emergencyresponsedrivertraining.co.uk/level-3-emergency-ambulance-driving/   Note: you can only access these courses if you are from a legitimate blue light organisation!

So, out of interest, I think we are saying that CRFs and blood carriers (Bike or otherwise as the rules do not distinguish) would come under the NHS and how they with to have their vehicles marked and what, if any exemptions that may be permitted - would you agree?  

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The Greater Good

According to Blue Light Aware (Membership of which includes ACPO & ACFO):

 Vehicles belonging to the National Blood Service or Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service, and certain other blood-carrying vehicles, are classed as emergency vehicles and may use blue lights.

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