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Pocket Notebook Mnemonics


ted123
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Learning these Mnemonics and description indicators will give you an advantage when learning about your Pocket Notebook and is something you will constantly find yourself referring back to in your police career


This information is readily available on the internet and applications like Pocket Sergeant and is not protected.


ELBOWS

ELBOWS is essentially the main rules regarding your PNB. Your PNB is a police document and can be used as evidence in court. There are rules in place to make your PNB accountable for your actions and the actions of others and the rules exist so this information cannot be tampered with.


No Erasures

No Leaves torn out

No Blank Spaces

No Overwriting

No Writing Between Lines

Statements in DIRECT SPEECH (CAPITALS)


Always use 24 hour clock e.g. 3.30PM is 1530 HRS

Names in CAPS e.g. Mr John SMITH

If mistake is made cross the word out with a single line and initial the mistake (the mistake still needs to be read)


ADVOKATE

Evidential requirements for recording identification of a suspect in a witness statement.


Amount of time spent with suspect

Distance of subject to suspect

Visibility - weather etc

Obstructions - cars or buildings obstructing your view?

Known or seen before

Any reason to remember the suspect

Timelapse between first and subsquence description

Errors betwen 1st description and actual appearance


10 point Person Description

1. Colour of skin

2. Age

3. Gender

4. Height

5. Build

6. Hairstyle/Colour

7. Complexion

8. Distinguishing features

9. Clothing

10. Carrying anything


6 point Vehicle Description

1. Make

2. Model

3. Colour

4. Distinguishing features (Dents, visible faults etc)

5. Type (4x4, Estate, Saloon etc)

5. VRM (Vehicle Registration Mark)

Edited by ted123
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I always find this description guide much better:

A = Age

B = Build

C = Clothing

D = Distinguishing marks/features

E = Elevation (height)

F = Face (shape, scars, eye colour/shape, etc)

G = Gaite

H = Hair

I = IC 1, 2, etc

J = Just like (similarities)

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ELBOWS
ELBOWS is essentially the main rules regarding your PNB. Your PNB is a police document and can be used as evidence in court. There are rules in place to make your PNB accountable for your actions and the actions of others and the rules exist so this information cannot be tampered with.
No Erasures
No Leaves torn out
No Blank Spaces
No Overwriting
No Writing Between Lines
SPEECH (CAPITALS)

The last one isn't quite right. Statements should be in direct speech (i.e. not paraphrased) rather than necessarily in caps. In fact I heard the advice for statements had changed and is not to capitalise direct speech as this could be construed to be aggressive or confrontational for many people.

Edited by Burnsy2023
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You are correct, it is statements in direct speech and I've made that more clear (this was a copy and paste)

We are being taught that direct speech should be in capitals and that if you always write in capitals anyway, you should underline instead that which should be in capitals

Edited by ted123
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I always find this description guide much better:

A = Age

B = Build

C = Clothing

D = Distinguishing marks/features

E = Elevation (height)

F = Face (shape, scars, eye colour/shape, etc)

G = Gaite

H = Hair

I = IC 1, 2, etc

J = Just like (similarities)

That sounds like a fairly effective way of remembering, but isn't what is taught in IL4SC which is what everyone is taught nationally now.

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That sounds like a fairly effective way of remembering, but isn't what is taught in IL4SC which is what everyone is taught nationally now.

"Taught". :thmbdn2:

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I loved the one about having to report collisions involving animals.

M mules

P pigs

D dogs

S sheep

H horses

A ass

G goats

CATTLE.

I wonder why I remember that one!.

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