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XA84

Graduates 'to be detectives in 12 weeks'

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XA84

Graduates can become detectives "in a matter of months" with the help of a new fast-track training programme.

The 12-week scheme is being developed in response to a shortfall of 5,000 investigators across England and Wales.

Although recruits will begin working on cases within three months, they will receive training over a two-year period.

Policing minister Nick Hurd said detectives "play an important role in bringing criminals to justice".

The government has set aside £350,000 for the new detective entry programme, which will focus on problem-solving, crime prevention and safeguarding.

South Wales Police Chief Constable Matt Jukes said: "Crime is changing, so we need people who are going to be cyber investigators, who can deal with a massive amount of information that's coming through social media."

He added that investigators are currently under pressure due to the shortage of available staff. Police forces are also looking at attracting PCs and civilian detectives to make up the 5,000 shortfall.

Mr Jukes said that new detectives would work on crime and robbery cases at the beginning of their training, rather than more complex cases.

"[We must] recognise they're working under enormous pressure, this is the opportunity to bring in a diverse and talented group of people," he said.


In March, it was revealed that there was a shortfall of 5,000 police detectives across England and Wales.

HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) called it "a national crisis", with one in five detective desks either empty or filled with unqualified staff.

The shortfall is believed to be the consequence of a rise in demand for personnel in specialist areas such as counter-terrorism, as well as the difficulties in retaining investigators in the face of a well-paid commercial sector.

The Police Federation warned last year that morale among detectives had hit "rock bottom" amid mounting workloads, exhaustion and stress.

The Home Office is working with Police Now, a police graduate recruitment programme, to develop the entry scheme.

David Spencer, a former detective and co-founder of Police Now, said he hoped the programme "will encourage a new group of diverse and brilliant individuals to enter the police service and contribute to the outstanding work being done by existing detectives up and down the country."

The scheme has no start date at present, but the Home Office said it hopes it will boost the number of detectives by up to 1,000 over the next five years.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-44433881

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Jimbo26

They need top address the cause of why officers don't want to be DC's or why they are leaving. This will be a huge waste of money unless unless they deal with the underlying issues first.

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mike88
Posted (edited)

Ah the whole “crime is changing” chestnut.

No, crime isn’t changing there just isn’t enough officers to meet the demand. The knock on effect of recruiting directly to CID will mean less opportunities for response officers to develope and less people joining as response officers which isn’t good for anyone already in the job. Also if these officers no longer want to be detectives what role could they go into with their limited training? You can’t replicate the experience gained from being a frontline PC in a classroom.

Edited by mike88

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Hyphen

What an absolute joke. Yet more evidence the people running things have absolutely no clue.

 

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Zulu 22

How much training would you need to be an MP.  12 weeks, 6 weeks, 1 week, 2 days.   Answers on the back of a postage stamp.

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Reasonable Man

Says their going to be detectives. Doesn't say they're going to be constables. Are these civilian investigators?

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Indiana Jones

I wouldn't put too much stock in what's on the BBC website.

Plainly, no one is going to be a DC out of nowhere, in a 12 week window. 

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Funkywingnut
5 hours ago, Hyphen said:

What an absolute joke. Yet more evidence the people running things have absolutely no clue.

 

Is it?  What the police has now is a stack of people who dont want to conduct an investigation role, so they are recruiting specifically for that role.   Graduate entry for me is silly, a degree in geography dent help, but picking the right people for the right job directly does work, look at NCA they do it. 

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JAS85

I'm on week 4 of training as a student officer. I've always had an eye on CID, without a closed mind to other things. I would hope this won't mean I'm struggling to get a place in the future given I'm probably as, or more, qualified than these direct entry folk and will have a MINIMUM of 2 years front line policing before I try CID.

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Hyphen
1 minute ago, Funkywingnut said:

Is it?  What the police has now is a stack of people who dont want to conduct an investigation role, so they are recruiting specifically for that role.   Graduate entry for me is silly, a degree in geography dent help, but picking the right people for the right job directly does work, look at NCA they do it. 

I appreciate it’s variable however everywhere I have worked a good chunk of people want to move in to detective work and do the associated courses/development. The issue certainly over the last few years is the lack of resources to pull from. If you’re running massively below a safe level of staffing then how can you take more cops to put in to a detective role.

The issue is then with the workloads in the CID department, again, due to cut backs and amalgamations in units. 

To give an idea of resourcing in around 2010 the borough I work would have had around 45 PCs on a response shift, more NPT cops, a Tactical support unit, more traffic cops and dogs than today. There was then a support team who dealt with prisoners in custody. There was a CID covering the borough. More specialisms also existed in terms of teams for sexual offences, burglarly team and fraud squad.

Now, on a good day we parade 18 cops (ran with 9 on nights last week), no support teams, NPT have been decimated, there is now one CID team which has been cut and is now shared between our borough and the large city we border. Thankfully there is still a burglary team for dwellings however again this is a shared team.

The amount of crimes, safeguarding work and complexity of many investigations has increased the workload even further on an already creaking workforce.

Its the same as many issues, there just aren’t enough people for all the demand and work that is required. This is why all units from CID to response to NPT are all wobbling.

I do however take your point re NCA and maybe there is a place for it, however, as a poster mentioned above they would likely be an investigator. They should not be called a Constable.

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cookyy2k

Hmm, do I go in full time or stick with what my qualifications qualify me to do and get paid twice as much. Tough choice...

I said it when they were trying to get IT graduates in for cyber crime units, if you want to attract these kinds of people you ain't going to do it for what is on offer.

That said I don't think any entry route other than 2 years on the streets should be being utilized. An investigator's role requires knowledge of the realities of policing, not just training to pass their NIE. I have been out to assist with arrests and other jobs with DCs, and on one occasion when we were really short on response with a couple of huge jobs running they were tipped out to assist us. The basics of police work should always be taught and developed first, plus the two year probation on the job helps to assess if someone is suitable for the work.

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Funkywingnut
8 minutes ago, Hyphen said:

I appreciate it’s variable however everywhere I have worked a good chunk of people want to move in to detective work and do the associated courses/development. The issue certainly over the last few years is the lack of resources to pull from. If you’re running massively below a safe level of staffing then how can you take more cops to put in to a detective role.

The issue is then with the workloads in the CID department, again, due to cut backs and amalgamations in units. 

To give an idea of resourcing in around 2010 the borough I work would have had around 45 PCs on a response shift, more NPT cops, a Tactical support unit, more traffic cops and dogs than today. There was then a support team who dealt with prisoners in custody. There was a CID covering the borough. More specialisms also existed in terms of teams for sexual offences, burglarly team and fraud squad.

Now, on a good day we parade 18 cops (ran with 9 on nights last week), no support teams, NPT have been decimated, there is now one CID team which has been cut and is now shared between our borough and the large city we border. Thankfully there is still a burglary team for dwellings however again this is a shared team.

The amount of crimes, safeguarding work and complexity of many investigations has increased the workload even further on an already creaking workforce.

Its the same as many issues, there just aren’t enough people for all the demand and work that is required. This is why all units from CID to response to NPT are all wobbling.

I do however take your point re NCA and maybe there is a place for it, however, as a poster mentioned above they would likely be an investigator. They should not be called a Constable.

So an Investigator with powers of arrest etc would be appropriate I feel.  

Whats the answer?  I have worked CID shifts, Response shifts, Drugs teams all with multiple forces, and quite frankly the manner in which the police is organised is the issue.  The police is breaking under pressure, and people may not like a new way but a new approach is needed.  I am not Home Office, I cannot transfer into a HO Force, but I have the same qualifications, same experience, regularly work on secondment, regularly switch jobs between HO and non HO Forces.   But I cannot be considered, where is the sense in that if the skill set is there?  Right people for the job, thats all I care about, change recruitment, test people on entry in a proper manner, stress them, pressure test them and stop this politically correct nonsense about we are all equal and no one can fail for fear of hurting their feelings.   You are good enough or you are not, its that simple. 

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SimonT

Why not some civilians to help with inquiries and support current staff? 

Doesn't sound good enough on a press release!

Can't think of many things that would reduce stress and boost productivity than a team to help file build,  disclosure, cctv trail, supporting statements etc 

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