95 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Radman said:

Rendering the document almost worthless as there is no way to verify it either way... That stinks of a poor process in place.

"Take on face value" 

Great advice with no liability towards the policy makers with all the risk on the decision makers at the time.

When dealing with life and death I'll defer to a high authority on that... 

But you won't defer to trained medical staff who have gone through the checklist and have arrived at the conclusion that they will not provide certain treatment? No doubt a decision they do not take lightly and if there was any doubt whatsoever regarding capacity or the validity of the document they would provide treatment.

 

It's a medical matter and I don't understand why some cops are so keen to stick their oar in when medical professionals are on scene and are the ones who make the decision on treatment. They are the ones who take on all this supposed risk and I can't see a police officer being criticised for deferring to an ambulance crew at a medical job. If it was a DNACPR type thing I don't think anybody on here would attempt CPR after an ambulance crew turns up and decides not to do it. This is no different really, once they are in attendance it is their decision.

 

I'm still not sure what you were referring to when you were talking about court orders in the checklist.

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1 hour ago, Sherlock said:

 


By the very fact the person has taken an OD would make me question their being in the right frame of mind to make that decision. So, I could provide first aid quite easily.


-Sherlock

 

Except the 1 of the 5 overriding principles of the MCA says you should not assume a lack of capacity simply because the person makes an unwise decision. That would include an OD

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Except the 1 of the 5 overriding principles of the MCA says you should not assume a lack of capacity simply because the person makes an unwise decision. That would include an OD


Taking an overdose in order to end your life is now deemed a mere "unwise decision", is it?


-Sherlock

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1 hour ago, Radman said:

Just how can a medical professional say they have capacity when they took an overdose of tablets that will kill them if untreated?

Taking this point in isolation, one of the Statutory Principles enshrined by the Mental Capacity Act is that "a person is not to be treated as unable to make a decision merely because he makes an unwise decision". There must be sound objective grounds to suppose that the person in question lacks the ability to retain and weigh information to come to a decision.

Anyone who applies the Mental Capacity Act should read the Code of Practice which accompanies it.

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1 hour ago, Sherlock said:

 


Taking an overdose in order to end your life is now deemed a mere "unwise decision", is it?


-Sherlock

 

Well it certainly isn't a wise one. 

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