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  1. This is the current uniform issued to Special Constables in A&S. If this changes, please leave a comment and I will update the list. Likewise, if someone can provide me with a list of uniform issued to regulars then I will update this original post. At the start of training you will be issued with: x2 White Shirts (long or short sleeve) x2 Black Trousers x1 Police Fleece x1 High-Vis Coat x1 High-Vis Tabbard x1 High-Vis Trousers x1 Pair of Leather Gloves x1 Custodian and x1 Patrol Cap (Male) x1 Bowler Hat (Female) x2 Sets of Epaulettes x2 Sets of Collar Number Slides x1 Clip-On Black Tie x1 Trosuer Belt x1 A&S PNB Cover x1 LED Lenser Torch in pouch x1 Duty Belt with the below pouches: BatonCS SprayHandcuffsSmall Medical PouchLarger Document PouchDuring training, you will be issued with: x1 Stab Vest x1 21" ASP Baton x1 Handcuffs with key x1 Radio Case x1 Radio Earpiece (G Shape) x1 Set of Limb Restraints in a pouch x1 Resuscitation Shield Boot allowance is £75. You are expected to have all kit avaliable to you for each module.
  2. Hi guys, so I thought I'd move over the thread I created originally on PS.com and bring it over here, enjoy! CKP in general: Information taken from College of Policing website. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CKP regarding Metropolitan Police: Do I need CKP to join as a Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police? Yes, if you want to become a Police Constable with us then yes, you will need CKP with one of the approved providers that can be found through the College of Policing website. You will need to have COMPLETED the KFC course prior to starting training. Will the CKP guarantee me a job as a Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police? No. You will still need to pass Day 1, Day 2, Vetting/References AND Training. Remember CKP does not guarantee you a job, it just makes you eligible to start training. Do I need CKP to join as a Police Constable if I am a Special Constable with the Metropolitan Police? Nope, you don't need CKP if you are in the Metropolitan Special Constabulary to join as a Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police. I am a Special Constable with another force, do I need the CKP to join as a Police Constable in the Metropolitan Police? Yes. This is because if you are with another force you are deemed as an external candidate. There are no rumours or any news of this changing any time soon and I think this will probably stick. Will the Metropolitan Police be getting rid of the CKP? Not for the foreseeable future. If you have heard rumours, please for god sake ignore them. If anything official is released I'm sure it will be on the Metropolitan Police website and here. Will the Metropolitan Police providing funding for the CKP? I believe if you are a successful candidate in passing the SEARCH assessments then the funding comes in the form of an interest free loan, paid back from your wage once you're in service. However, confirm this with MetHR as there could be certain requirements and/or the information could have changed. I have already attained a SEARCH assessment pass in the last 2 years, do I still need the CKP? Oh yes. I have attained the PLC in the last 3-4 years, do I still need to do the CKP? As it stands, and as far as I'm aware you will not have to do the CKP - but like most things, I would confirm this with MetHR. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- These are all the questions I could think of. If you have any more questions, please ask below. If anyone thinks I am missing any information or any information is incorrect please add below and I will add or correct . As it stands, this is a thread for External Met PC applicants. Hope this helps! Useful links: College of Policing Metropolitan Police Careers Bluelight Other approved providers
  3. We are pleased to announce that we are currently recruiting for Special Constables to work at locations across the Force area. Follow the links below to find out more about becoming a Special Constable with West Yorkshire Police. New : Are you a Student? Could you join us and #BeSpecial? Find out more here. Special Constable - Blog http://www.westyorkshire.police.uk/bespecial
  4. Hades

    Current Recruitment

    Surrey is currently accepting Detective Constables and Police Constables as transferees. DCs must be PIP2 accredited. PCs must be Response trained drivers. Surrey officers are eligible for a £2000 South-East Regional Allowance on top of basic salary. Closing date is 7th November 2014. They're also accepting applications for Special Constables, intake dates yet to be confirmed. Apply online here: http://www.surrey.police.uk/careers/current-vacancies
  5. A strange and regrettable decision has been taken by the British Transport Police. Today’s Sun on Sunday reports that it has decided to dispense with the services of two special constables, David Davies, the MP for Monmouth, and Philip Hollobone, the MP for Kettering.   Our legislators are often accused of being cut off from ordinary people. It is to Davies and Hollobone’s credit that between them, they have accumulated 15 years’ service as specials: a form of public service very different to being an MP, and certainly a way of experiencing the world from a different angle.   Last year, a new code of ethics was introduced for police officers, which says they “must not take any part in politics”. But chief constables are allowed to exercise discretion in individual cases. It seems, to say the least, a great pity that Paul Crowther, chief constable of the British Transport Police, did not decide to keep Davies and Hollobone.   It happens that the two MPs concerned are Conservatives: but the Sun On Sunday reports that Brian Donohoe, the Labour MP for Central Ayrshire, who is himself a former special, has described the chief constable’s decision as “a mistake”. Mike Penning, the policing minister, has urged a re-think, while Davies himself has said he did not want to leave.   No police officer, whether full-time or part-time, should allow his party political convictions to affect the way he carries out his duties, but there is absolutely no suggestion that these two MPs were doing so. It is ridiculous and unjust to imagine that parliamentarians are unable to behave in a strictly unpartisan manner when carrying out roles which require such conduct. Even at Westminster, they quite often have to do that.   It is no good accusing MPs of being cut off, and then stopping them from serving as specials. This decision should be reversed.   http://www.conservativehome.com/parliament/2015/01/davies-and-hollobone-should-be-reinstated-as-special-constables.html   I posted the above article rather than the BBC one http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-30768583 as they have not quit as the BBC states but rather been asked to resign. Also this article provides more discussion and opinion for us to comment on.
  6. RomeoAlpha

    Special DCs

    Just out of interest, are there any Detective Special Constables out there anywhere, as I know some specials can specialise.
  7. Chief Rat

    Specials and Specialisms

    Here's one for you folks... How many Special Constables does it take to change a lightbulb.... Eh hang on wrong question With all of the austerity cuts that affect the servuce at the moment many departments have been reduced in size. I know our Roads Policing Unit has sustained a number of cuts with staff who have either retired , not replaced or alternatively moved back to district policing. To some degree not completely their places have been back filled by the use of Special Constables which in the case if my force is a new move towards further integration of regs and specials in specialised areas, where previously they were predominantly working within neighbourhood policing roles. Now ours haven't been given the authority to drive the RPU vehicles but in time this might change but it's early doors. I just wondered what it's like in other forces really. Does your force provide opportunities to specialise in RPU for instance and if so, what's your role like. Do you have greater freedom. What do you actually do or allowed to do. I'd be interested to know your thoughts. Thanks folks.
  8. “YORKSHIRE born and bred”: it’s an often heard remark that sums up the strong sense of identity that is felt in this, our unique part of the country. It’s used by many who, like me, left for places further afield and then came home again. In my case it was a return to policing rural Yorkshire after 10 years in the Metropolitan Police. I returned to Yorkshire because my heart is here. I was lucky to be able to police the communities and places I have a strong attachment to. Today I speak to police officers the length and breadth of Yorkshire on a daily basis. Many, like me, are born and bred in God’s Own County. If you listen to the almost daily media stories about our police, you would be led to believe that they are all corrupt, and doing a terrible job. They aren’t. Don’t get me wrong, policing in Yorkshire has had its fair share of criticism and in some cases rightly so. The historic failings associated with the Miners’ Strike, Hillsborough, Savile and Rotherham have impacted on public confidence and it is only right and just that those responsible for any wrongdoing or inaction should be held to account. What we must recognise is that the vast majority of police officers across North, West, South Yorkshire and Humberside had no involvement in these events. Some weren’t even born when they took place. I always take the view that we need balance. For 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the men, women and civilian staff of our police forces in Yorkshire are quietly getting it right. This unrecognised work and commitment is something very dear to me and I bend over backwards to highlight the hard work, bravery and dedication that often escapes the mainstream media. Being open and honest to the public about getting it wrong is called “transparency”. Getting it right is an expectation that we deserve from our police service. I personally think that promoting their day to day achievements and successes is something that the police could do much better, and in my own way I try to redress the balance. Believe me, there are far more incidents of getting it right than there are of getting it wrong. Only recently, and a matter of days after a sterling police investigation saw the conviction of the youth who murdered Leeds teacher Ann Maguire, I saw criticism in the media of how scruffy some Yorkshire police officer uniforms were. Once again the pendulum swings from good to bad in a heartbeat. Before you snipe at scruffy police officers, you must remember that the police operate in an environment of procurement and tendering for uniform and kit. Faced with decimating cuts and huge financial constraints, it’s no surprise that their uniforms often come from the provider who bid the lowest price. You get what you pay for, as they say. A recent example of getting it right in Yorkshire was the hugely successful Tour de France, a major policing operation not only in terms of security but also in terms of making it run safely and smoothly. Because it wasn’t a high-profile crime investigation the efforts of the police went largely unnoticed, but the fact is they were tasked with enhancing the reputation of Yorkshire. They rose to the occasion magnificently. They excelled at dealing with people face to face, re-affirming the unique relationship that they have with the public in this country – the “tradition of trust”. Maintaining this tradition is at the heart of the service and it is best done by visible policing which means police officers connecting with the public they serve. Swingeing cuts have led to the loss of hundreds and hundreds of police officers with yet more to come over the next few years. It is manifestly unfeasible to expect the same level of visibility in our communities, particularly rural parts. Inevitably the village bobby and the police station in the town have nearly all but disappeared. Police chiefs are desperately trying to maintain a police presence in the rural communities with only handfuls of police officers and PCSOs. I spoke in Cumbria recently, another rural force. A local town police station had had to be sold off and was now one of a chain of cheap and cheerful pubs. It’s almost heartbreaking. I do worry for the future of the multiple forces in their current form and wouldn’t be surprised if the next few years saw an amalgamation into one large Yorkshire region force. Although I see the benefits, my concern is that it is crucial to maintain that local link. In 2015 and beyond I want to see greater co-operation between our four forces. Make the most of each other’s skills and assets, with the ability to move resources across borders to identify and tackle crime hotspots. We need to build up our volunteers who work with our farm watch and country watch schemes, having dedicated points of contacts within policing and having better methods of receiving and sharing intelligence, again cross-border. I’d also like to see the expansion of our special constables right across the Yorkshire forces, in particular concentrating on retention and making best use of any specialist skills they bring with them. Why have a computer expert on the books, and not have them working on complex issues such as cyber crime? Another area which can be improved is making smarter use of social media. It’s clear to me from my own use of Twitter that I can very often find out what our police are doing in Yorkshire and elsewhere, long before it hits the mainstream media. With real police officers posting messages about what they’re doing, it brings out the human side of policing, and a better understanding of what they do. Finally I would urge our four police crime commissioners and chief constables to place officer and staff morale at the top of the agenda. The constant bad press weighs heavily on those very men and women we turn to when things go wrong, and are often left having to make life-changing decisions. I’m also working hard in 2015 to highlight the exceptional work the 99.9 per cent of our police service do daily. I wish you all a safe and happy Christmas. • Mike Pannett is a retired police officer and author of A Likely Tale, Lad, published by Dalesman Publications, price £14.99. http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/debate/columnists/mike-pannett-quiet-commitment-deserves-our-respect-1-7002247 Good article, not sure about the advert
  9. So Special Constables are not allowed to be members of the Police Federation? I read somewhere that there was a debate last year and it was agreed in principal that Specials could join but nothing moved forward from that. The real question here is if a Special Constable needs legal representation for a Constabulary related matter who does he/she turn to? A private Solicitor which will obviously cost! Are we really this under represented considering that we are open to the same disciplinary procedures as our regular colleagues. I agree that we should be subject to the same disciplinary procedures but also think that we should be afforded some sort of legal representation. Does anyone have thoughts on this or an answer to be legally represented should we need to be?
  10. "West Mercia Police need more recruits urgently, says crime commissioner West Mercia Police has been urged by its crime commissioner to take urgent steps to speed up the recruitment process. Cuts in the human resources department have made it more difficult for new officers to be vetted to join the force, according to Bill Longmore. The lack of recruitment has also led to an underspend within the force’s budget, as money had been purposely held back for more front line staff, he said. Mr Longmore said cutbacks within the force, which is trying to save £30 million between April 2015 and 2018, had affected some parts of the service worse than others and there had also been a high and unexpected number of retirements. He also said he was frustrated with how long it was taking to recruit new faces at a time in which the force was facing huge change with its operational alignment with Warwickshire Police. The two forces announced in May that 140 new officers would be taken on, but Mr Longmore said progress had been slow. It is believed around 100 of the vacancies are still to be filled. “We have been going through a lot of changes over the last two years,” he said. “With West Mercia and Warwickshire being put together we have made cuts and the HR department is one area that has suffered. “One of the areas I focused on was keeping 50 community support officers and special constables. We’ve also lost a bigger number of people leaving the force through retirement than expected. “We have identified there is a shortage but the speed of the recruitment process has not been fast enough. It’s been very frustrating, especially the vetting policies that go on today, which takes time. But this has now become a matter of urgency.” Despite the underspend Mr Longmore said he did not believe money in place for new officers would betaken away by the Government at a later date. He said: “We are also addressing our underspend and it’s not money we’ve simply been sitting on. We will be looking at ways to spend this money, as well as continuing to save money, which is a sensible way of going forward.” Mr Longmore said the two forces were “a long way down the road” towards becoming a joint force but that the final decision was one for the politicians. He said: “It is whatever they decide, but all I want is whatever is best for the two areas. We’re always looking at the best way forward for the police service.” West Mercia and Warwickshire Police announced early this month staff numbers could be cut in an attempt to save an extra £30 million. The force, which has almost finished an existing three-year plan to cut spending by the same amount, which started in 2012, began a consultation on how save the additional money between 2015 and 2018. West Mercia Police is also in the process of closing 33 police stations and buildings to save £1.5 million. Chief Constable David Shaw said fundamental changes had been made to the way West Mercia police was run over the last few years. He said: “Perhaps we haven’t put enough thought into bringing new people in. “It’s got nothing to do with people not working hard enough but we just want to make sure not a single pound of taxpayers’ money is wasted.” He added: “We will be bringing new people into the force but we also want to use the resources we have better. “I am incredibly proud of our force despite the £30 million cuts. “We may have cut back a little bit far in some areas but the next phase of change will be planning where to spend the money, where to reinvest and where to bring people in. It’s our next major project and if we need use different agencies to bring new people in that’s what we will do. “We are as HR-reliant as any company because every organisation needs such people to make it work. We need IT experts and all the other aspects to help us.” Warwickshire Chief Constable Andy Parker said recruitment was now “back on track”. West Mercia Police announced this month it was opening a fresh round of recruitment to find the next generation of officers through the police cadets." http://www.shropshirestar.com/news/2014/11/28/west-mercia-police-need-more-recruits-urgently/ Thought this was interesting
  11. PartTimePlod

    Issued Uniform

    As I notice some of the other force forums have done it, I thought I would help out. I'm pretty sure TVP issue the following to all Special Constables: 1 x Peaked Cap (male) / Bowler Hat (female) 1 x Black Soft Shell Fleece 1 x Lightweight Long Sleeve Hi-Vis 1 x Heavyweight Long Sleeve Hi-Vis 1 x Long sleeve black wicking shirt 1 x Short sleeve black wicking shirt 2 x Black combat Trousers 1 x Black Waterproof Trousers 1 x Hi-Vis Over trousers * 1 x Pair Shoulder Boards (fold over style for wicking shirts) 2 x Shoulder Sliders (1 for DPV and 1 for soft shell) 1 x Dual Purpose Vest Holder 2 x DPV Panels for above 1 x DPV Bag 1 x Radio (Personal Issue) 1 x Radio Earpiece 1 x Radio Clip for Microphone loops on Jackets 1 x Radio Cover 1 x Duty Belt 1 x Trouser Belt 1 x PJ ILG Handcuff Holder 1 x PJ ILG 22" Baton Holder 1 x PJ ILG CapTor holder 1 x Belt KlikFast Dock 1 x First Aid Pouch (with gloves and face mask) 2 x Belt Keeps 1 x Clear Plastic PNB Cover 1 x Pair of black leather gloves 1 x Mondanock 22" Autolock Baton 1 x HiAtt Quickcuffs 2 x Short Cuff Key 1 x Warrant Card Holder 2 x TVP Badge (one for shirt / spare and one for warrant card holder) Above 5 items will be issued at OST, returned to trainers and then issued at attestation. * Hi Vis over trousers are not always issued to every SC!
  12. Candles

    Recruitment Status

    West Midlands Police Police Constable - Status: Closed (last updated 16-Jun-2017) Recruitment is about to open for Police Constables - West Midlands PC Recruitment page. Special Constable - Status: Closed (last updated 16-Jun-2017) Recruitment is currently closed for Special Constables. PCSO - Status: Closed (last updated 16-Jun-2017) Recruitment is currently closed for PCSOs - West Midlands PCSO Recruitment page. Police Staff - Status: Open (last updated 16-Jun-2017) There are currently a number of vacancies, however, this changes regularly, please visit Current Vacancies for the latest. Please post to the Recruitment thread if you know of any news on recruitment.
  13. Dyfed-Powys Police Special Constabulary Contents: Application ProcessTrainingRank StructureFrequently Asked QuestionsOther1. Application Process To become a Special Constable within Dyfed-Powys Police, an applicant can find the application forms and other information on the Dyfed-Powys Police website. The forms etc are also listed here: Becoming A Special Constable BrochureSpecial Constable Application FormEqual Opportunities and Diversity Monitoring FormSpecial Constable Vetting Check FormSpecial Constable Fitness Test Information Once these forms have been read, completed and submitted, they are marked by the Special Constabulary Co-Ordinator, and the post holder will then contact the applicant via letter, to inform them whether they have passed the paper sift or now. If you have been successful in passing the paper sift, you will in due course receive a date for an Assessment Centre. The Assessment Centre (AC), consists of: Police Initial Recruitment Test (PIRT) which is split into 4 sections.Verbal UsageInformation CheckingNumeric ReasoningLogical ReasoningPanel Interview - The interviewers are a mixture of serving and senior Special Constables, Trainers, and HR, and the questions are based upon the Police Professional Framework. More information can be found here on the Skills For Justice website. After successful completion of the Assessment Centre, applicants are invited for a Fitness Test and Medical Examination; fitness information has been posted above. Vetting and security checks are carried out throughout the process, and an in-depth form is provided to gather details in regards to family members, previous addresses etc. 2. Training Training has changed over the years; it has previously been 6 weekends, then 8 weekends. Recently in a restructuring of the Special Constabulary; the training was extended over 14 training weekends over 6 months and covers your basic law input, common offences, Pocket Notebook Rules, First Aid, Officer Safety Training and using AIRWAVE radios as well as a diversity input. 3. Rank Structure Dyfed-Powys Police service, through late 2010 and early 2011 re-structured its Special Constabulary; The Special Constabulary is the part-time volunteer section. Its officers are known as Special Constables (all hold the office of Constable no matter what their rank) or informally as Specials. It has become known to many organisations as well as the police that volunteers are best managed by volunteers, so this new command and rank structure has been designed with that in mind, to boost the effectiveness of the Special Constabulary. With this re-structuring, there have been many new appointments, these include the following: Special Constabulary Lead - SuperintendentSpecial Constabulary Co-Ordinator and then we go on to the Specials themselves:Special Constabulary, Chief OfficerSpecial Constabulary, Inspectors; x4 Inspectors, one per Basic Command Unit (BCU)Special Constabulary, Sergeants; formerly Section Officers With this restructuring, Dyfed-Powys Police is the first Police service in Wales to adopt the former National Policing Improvement Agencies (NPIA) National Standard for the Special Constabulary. 4. Frequently Asked Questions Am I eligible to join the Special Constabulary?What powers will I have?What duties can I perform?How much time am I expected to commit?Do I get paid?How long does the application process take?How fit should I be?Are there any occupations a Special Constable cannot hold?What if I got into trouble in my past?How much time is a Special Constable expected to commit?Is this a stepping stone to the Regular Police?Do I need to inform my employer?Do you take my Fingerprints?If I want to apply, what should I do next?What if I want to help, but not as a Special Constable?Am I eligible to join the Special Constabulary? In order to become a Special Constable you must: Be a British or Commonwealth citizenBe aged between 18½ and 55Enjoy good health and have good vision. The wearing of spectacles or contact lenses is permitted.Be of good characterWhat powers will I have? Special Constables have all the legal powers of their regular counterparts when on and off duty and, as of 1 April 2007, can use their powers throughout England and Wales. Prior to this date, Special Constables' powers were restricted to within their force areas and neighbouring forces only. What duties can I perform? The duties Specials are asked to perform are many and varied. Examples are: Foot patrol with a Community Beat Officer.Crowd and traffic control at local events.General response patrols with Regular Officers.In fact Special Constables participate in most areas of policingHow much time am I expected to commit? As a Special Constable in Dyfed Powys, you are asked to commit a minimum of sixteen hours per month and attend a monthly training session. Do I get paid? Special Constables do not get paid. However, out of pocket expenses are paid. Uniform and equipment are provided free, except for footwear for which a small 'Boot Allowance' is paid annually. How long does the application process take? We aim to process applications as quickly and efficiently as possible and will keep applicants informed at all stages of the process. What qualifications should I have? You do not require qualifications to become a Special Constable or a Police Officer. However you will be asked to sit a Police Initial Recruitment Test (PIRT) as part of the recruitment process for the Special Constabulary. Further information will be provided about the test when you request an application form. The main areas tested in the PIRT are: The ability to spell words and construct sentences correctly.The ability to check information quickly and correctly.The ability to solve numerical problems accurately.The ability to reason logically when given facts about events.How fit should I be? You should be reasonably fit, as a fitness test forms part of the recruitment process. Further information will be provided in recruitment pack. Are there any occupations a Special Constable cannot hold? As Special Constables possess the powers and privileges of a regular Constable, it is necessary to minimise the risk that they may be pressed to abuse their powers whilst off duty. The Home Office has identified a number of occupations where there may be a conflict of interest with the role of Special Constables. In view of this, applicants who are employed in these capacities would not be eligible for appointment to the Special Constabulary. A full list is available upon request by telephoning our recruitment team on 01267 226294. A list of Restricted Occupations list Revised by the NPIA in 2011 What if I got into trouble in my past? A conviction or caution is not an automatic eliminator. Disclose all details, including mitigations and each case will be considered on merit. Is this a stepping stone to the Regular Police? The majority stay in the Special Constabulary to give many years of valuable service to the community. Some Special Constables find that they enjoy policing and go on to become regular, full-time Police Officers. The training and experience from being a Special Constable will stand you in good stead both in preparing your application and at the interview. Do I need to inform my employer? All Special Constables are advised to inform their employers of their appointment and the hours they are likely to perform each week so as to satisfy certain requirements under the Working Time Regulations (WTR). You may occasionally have to attend court as a witness during your working hours. If this occurs you would receive prior notice and would be able to claim for any loss of earnings, which resulted. Do you take my Fingerprints? All appointees to the Special Constabulary are required to have their fingerprints taken. These will be retained on file for elimination purposes only and will be destroyed when a Special Constable leaves the Force. If a Special Constable is successful in an application to join the regular force, this information may be transferred. If I want to apply, what should I do next? An application form can be obtained by ringing the Recruitment & Selection 24hr answerphone on 01267 226165, quoting the following reference number 323/WEB or alternatively you can e-mail Specials Recruitment stating your full name, address and date of birth. What if I want to help, but not as a Special Constable? Dyfed Powys Police are also looking for Civilian Volunteers. We give individuals the opportunity to use their skills, experience and local knowledge to make a positive contribution in their community by supporting our work. 5. Other Dyfed-Powys Police SC related videos:
  14. Hi all, This is a 'short' post, detailing my own experiences three years ago of the training programme for the TVP SC. I am, three years later, still service as a Special Sergeant within Thames Valley Police and believe my account to still be accurate. ----- Sulhampsted, Thames Valley Polices Force Training Facility, provides a locale where all Special Constables that are invited to attend training with TVP will be taught the knowledge and skills that they need to become proficient probationers in the role of a Volunteer Police Officer. The training is broken down into 8 weekends (5 Law weekends, 1 First Aid weekend and two Officer Safety Training weekends), and most of these weekends will be held at Sulhampsted. Some training weekends may have venues changed on an intake-by-intake basis, and you'll be notified of these in good time. DJS writes this regarding Sulhampsted: ---------- Weekend 1, Day 1: You'll need to arrive on site as early as you can; the site isn't massive but it takes a few minutes to get to the White House, get your pass for the weekend, get a room key, find your room, let yourself in, unpack, make your bed, and then find the Canteen. There are various assistants and other students around to help you find your way as best you can; if you're unsure of anything, simply ask. Day one sees you meet the rest of your intake, plus any others who have turned up early from other intakes. You'll probably have 20 or 30 minutes for you to relax and get to know each other, before you're met by the Duty Sergeant for Training and normally the Special Chief Constable (or in our case, the Special Superintendent). There'll be a bit of information put your way in the Canteen that will include expected standards of behaviour, the expected dress code until your uniform is issued on Law Weekend 3, and some of the learning requirements for the course. The Specials Training Coordinator, will then split the intake into groups if appropriate, and you'll be asked to head upstairs to a classroom to start the process off. In this session, you'll be provided with your Shoulder Numbers, and the Stations that you've been assigned to, and have an opportunity to correct any personal information. There'll be a reasonable pile of paperwork on your desk for you to take a look at as well - please ensure you're near a chair when you see it! You'll talk a little about Needs, Concerns and Expectations, and then probably head to bed! Weekend 1, Day 2: Into the crux of it. You'll be into the same classrooms with the same people, have a bit of an ice breaker with your trainer, and then get into the lesson about Equality and Diversity, Prejudice and Discrimination, and legislative expectations. You'll also have an appropriate introduction to the TVP Intranet, where you can find critical information, and be provided access to the TVP E-Mail system. You'll need to have the appropriate sections of your IL4SC pre-join workbook signed and ready to hand in, and be prepared to sign even more paperwork! In the same evening, you'll likely be asked to perform some E-Learning through the NCALT system; all will be explained to you if you're a technophobe! Lessons generally end at around 18:30, but the breaks are well spaced, and the pace of the lessons is appropriate. That, and there's a limitless supply of tea and coffee! Saturday evening is generally the first sensible opportunity to head to one of the local pubs; the Fox and Hounds seems to be the more popular establishment, and their Ice Cream is simply sublime! Weekend 1, Day 3: On Day 3, you'll learn a little more about what you can expect as a Police Officer. You'll talk about Neighbourhood Policing, an understanding of the structure of each LPA, and where you can expect to fit into the process. You'll start talking about some sensitive information, and there's the possibility of the requirement to hand in another signed bit of paperwork. You'll then start discussing Police Intelligence, when and how you can submit such information, and the ramifications of doing so! After that, it's home time, with some homework set for you Posted Image ---------- Weekend 2, Day 1: Make sure you arrive on site nice and early; there's nothing quite like strolling into the classroom late because you felt like having dinner at home rather than braving Specials issue Sandwiches... The less said about those the better! There'll be plenty of signs around to show you where you need to be; look for your intake identifier, and it'll tell you which room you need to be in and who will be taking that lesson. Lesson number one for the weekend is quite straightforward: the rules and regulations of your Pocket Notebooks. You'll be shown a set of rules and guidance notes on how to fill them in, and various methods of writing descriptions. Please be aware that Thames Valley Police has been renamed Mnemonic Central, and you'll have about 4 to try to remember by the end of this lesson! Before long, you'll be issued with your very own (to keep on your person whilst on shift at all times on punishment of doughnut rationing) yellow covered notebook. You'll be told how to fill in the front cover to the character (numbers and letters included), and I would urge you not to put pen to paper until you've been told exactly what to do. You'll then be taken for a casual stroll down to the Whitehouse building, where something might happen that might require you to makae your very first PNB entry! Weekend 2, Day 2: Morning 5 of training requires you to learn about Statements. It'll be explained to you that often, you won't be taking statements from witnesses, as this often requires extra training and comes in conjunction with interviewing technique (a week long course if any of you fancy it in the future). You'll be taught the rules for writing statements, some pointers for descriptive writing, and how statements will be used in court. From that you'll start learning about the legislation that surrounds the Power of Arrest for constables, where the power comes from, and how to use it. You'll learn a little about citizens arrest, the expectations of you as a constable whilst performing an arrest and the words you need to say when performing an arrest. Getting this wrong has severe implications, so take plenty of notes, and as ever, if you're unsure, please ask. After this, you'll have a bit of fun acting out scenarios, with the assistance of some of your classmates, that will lead to you making an arrest if you deem it to be appropriate. After that, your arrest will need to be recorded somewhere... You'll also be required to prepare a statement for anything else that may have been recorded, possibly from the night before (if anything happened...). Weekend 2, Day 3: On the Sunday, you'll start learning about how the Police communicate. You'll learn about the Control Room, the functions that they perform, and how to liaise with them. You'll then talk about one of the core functions of the control room more specifically; PNC Checks. PNC contains vast amounts of information that's crucial to the role of a Police Officer. You'll be taught when you can and can't request a PNC check, how to do so and an expectation of the information that you can expect back. After that, perhaps the most fun part of the weekend: airwave issue and training. You'll be given your very own Police Airwave radio, and taught it's functions. This will be followed by a fun little practical test; bring a coat: it gets cold. ---------- Weekend Three, Day One Tension and anticipation were high this weekend, for two reasons: remember everyone's names after the Christmas break was kind of tricky, but more importantly, Friday night was Uniform Issue night! We started Friday, however, discussing the plan for the weekend, before starting to discuss the legislation behind the first bit of law that we can actually nick people for: Theft. You'd think it sounds kind of straight forward, but once you've defined "theft," you then have to define "dishonestly," "appropriates," "property" and God knows what else. Try to take it all in; it's useful to learn the format of the legislation to prepare you for what's to come. After you've studied Theft for 90 minutes or so, you'll be taken down to the hall for your Uniform Issue. You'll be given anything between 1 and 3 bags full (or not...) of equipment, and asked to check what's IN the bag against what SHOULD be in the bag - trust me when I say there's a miscorrelation. You'll then be free to lug it all back to your room, and try it all on, posing in front of whatever mirrors you can find. Your trainers may ask you to bag your Baton, Cuffs, Warrant Card Holder and Badges and hand them in; they should be given back to you at OST, and then taken in again until your Attestation. Weekend Three, Day Two Get a good nights sleep because day two is long. You learnt about Theft on Friday; on Saturday you learn about more Theft, Going Equipped, Criminal Damage, Racially or Religiously Aggravated Criminal Damage, Statutory Preventative Measures, Offensive Weapons, Bladed or Sharply Pointed Articles, Exhibits and Property Handling and as many digressions as you can fit into one day (believe me, we had lots. And many of them were my fault (sorry guys!)). The Exhibits and Property Handling section will probably be covered in the Lecture Theatre, but you can expect the rest of it to be in the classroom, and somewhat death by PowerPoint. As much as the trainers try to detract from the fact that it's essentially a wall of words, there's no hiding from the fact that actually you need to know some of these down to the word. Our trainers were nice enough to let us finish at 5; normally, you'd have dinner and be back in at 6 to start Stop and Search, but I think they're trying to phase that out. Weekend Three, Day Three Inevitably (because of what I've just said...), day three consisted of Stop and Search; the legal power behind it, what we need to cover whilst doing it, and the forms we need to fill out as a result of it (because the Police love forms, right?). It'll be a tough morning, but there's plenty to look forward to for the afternoon; we were asked to bring our full rig to the Stop and Search practical, and I must tell you it felt rather good to be stood outside in your full rig, roleplaying a stop search! Take the opportunity to start reading through Blackstones well in advance of this weekend - I started looking at S&S about Tuesday last week and must say I felt reasonably familiar with what was covered in the lesson by the time we got there. Above all else, enjoy yourself! We had a great laugh with out trainer, and I think it makes the learning process a bit easier. Then again, I am a bit of a jester and the rest of my intake probably want to kill me! ---------- Weekend Four, Day One Arrival as always was met by the subtle, loving, gentle tastes of TVP Sandwiches, before heading down to our classroom for the weekend. We were introduced to a fantastic part-time trainer, who would talk to us about Alcohol Related Offences. MC was a very experienced Police Officer, and a couple of his examples in relation to offences were very believable, but also quite insightful. We discussed some drink related offences, how they can be identified and a little about what we can do about them. Most of what's discussed is common sense, but there are a few surprise curveballs in there about how we can deal with offenders in ways other than arresting them. Thankfully, your Friday night is relatively straight forward, but be prepared for... Weekend Four, Day Two Now, you may well do this in a different order, but on Day Two, we discussed Assaults and Anti-Social Behaviour in quite an amount of detail. The Assaults section was interesting, but an amount of it is common sense when you remember that an Assault can include a threat to harm, not just the physical action of doing it. Apparently a lot of Police Officers get confused over Assault, so make sure you take plenty of notes and read up on them in the future. As always, if you have questions (or even examples!) feel free to pipe up in the lesson! Anti-social Behaviour includes the legislation that governs it, what it can be used for, and again, some examples of their proper, and improper use. Unfortunately, the current Government doesn't like ASBOs, and seem to be trying to phase them out. However, the Act that introduced them looks like it might stay, so the future of Anti-Social behaviour Orders is undetermined at the moment. A lot of people have a clear misunderstanding of what ASBOs are designed to do. Thankfully, the lesson makes clear what options are available to us (which doesn't just constitute ASBOs but can include ABCs, ARDs, YRDs, RJ Mediation and so on and so forth), and how we can utilise them. It actually sounds rather interesting if you ask me! However, you need to be prepared for another You vs. Legislation faceoff, and bring plenty of paper! I've taken up about half an A4 notepad so far on this course! As an aside, I shall mention here a little role-play opportunity that we had: whilst our course was on-going, there were a number of officers attending with the prospect of becoming Tutors. These will be the people who will be guiding new Special Constables once they hit the big nasty real world. We were asked to provide a number of student Officers, stooges and observers in order to allow the assessors assess the tutors tutoring (wow...). It was another opportunity to tackle a scenario for those that took part, as well as gain some valuable feedback from experienced Officers. A good time was had by all! Weekend Four, Day Three Was spent looking at Public Order offences and PNDs. Public Order (and Breach of the Peace) is a fairly defined section of Law, and generally looks as though it's used in relation to drunkenness. I was actually surprised at this section, as our trainer said that often, when arresting for BoP or Public Order offences, there will often have been other offences committed as well. It's amazing how many laws a criminal breaks by opening their mouth with some rotten words in a busy street on a Saturday night! Unfortunately this is another fun packed day of Legislation, and your wrists will probably be sore by the end of the day. However, at the end of the day is the fun sounding PND Practical! Unfortunately for us, this constituted sitting in a classroom and writing out a PND. Other versions of the same event have included speaking with a "suspect" and deciding whether or not to issue them a PND. Personally I'm a little upset, as I think every role-play we can get will be invaluable! But I guess we made up for it on our little role-play from Day Two. ---------- Weekend Five, Day One A fairly laid back evening if I'm honest, with a fairly laid back trainer. We were introduced to a room (Holdsworth Hall) in which a crime scene had been laid out. In a little bit of a role-play, we were taken into the room, in darkness, with a Torch, and asked to "act out" the Scene, thinking of preserving the scene if appropriate. It sure as hell beat sitting in a classroom watching Power Point presentations flick past! Afterwards, we had a bit of a discussion and looked at some of the forms relevant to Scenes of Crime, and that was that for the evening. Friday was strange; everyone had the anticipation for Sunday but nobody was quite willing to admit it (in my opinion at least). It wasn't until... Weekend Five, Day Two ... that everyone starts talking about "oh word, it's tomorrow!" Sitting down to breakfast, all you can hear is talk of Attestation. The anticipation really builds now, and Sunday can't come quickly enough. Anywho, it was back up to the classroom for 09:00, and we started talking at Powers of Entry. Sadly, no practical involvement this time (the big red door key requires a separate course, so I'm told), buts lots of legislation to cover. Various sections of PACE and a few other fun ones thrown in as well. PofE is obviously quite important for what we do, and is yet another area where attention in the classroom is key! Later in the morning we went for a Restricted briefing (I'm not even going to tell you who from), before settling down in the Learning Resource Centre and studying a bit of Domestic Violence. Thankfully there was no room for practical involvement here either... We were given the best part of 2 hours after lunch to fight our way onto NCALT (it doesn't cooperate) and get through the NCALT package, before heading back down to the classroom for some discussion. We later looked at DASHH forms, which are to be filled out whenever a Domestic situation is reported and attended. Unfortunately, Domestic Violence is all too real, and not something to be taken lightly. I reckon we've all served a "get back in the Kitchen" joke in our time, and probably will do in the future. But by jove will I think of some of the videos we watched and the discussions that we had. I must say, I'm not looking forward to dealing with my first Domestic. After we'd been thoroughly terrified by some wife beaters, we headed back downstairs to the Canteen. Somebody decided that Finger Painting was a good idea, followed by a good old toothbrush. What I actually mean by this is that our finger prints were taken in order to eliminate us from forensic investigations where appropriate, and our DNA was taken by using some Mouth swabs. We were told that we were lucky/fortunate enough to be allowed to take our own, but I suspect that everyone takes their own as it saves the trainers bucket loads of time! This was all rather good fun, which was followed shortly by a rehearsal for... Attestation: Weekend Five, Day Three A day of mixed emotions; some of the presentations that we had throughout the day were quite sombre and somewhat eye opening (even at this late stage in the game), but the mix of humour and anticipation really helped everyone pull through. Before breakfast, we headed upstairs to have our photo's taken and our Warrant cards printed. It was a strange sensation, handling and signing something that you 've yet to be issued! We started the morning off, not quite as billed, but with a presentation about Professional Standards. Who expects what from us, what do they expect, and how can we ensure that we provide that? We were even taught how to put our hats on properly. No, I'm not joking. It goes on from the front backwards. With a thumb spare. After a quick break, back down to the classroom to learn about Crime Recording. We looked at another high-tech, modern TVP application in which notes of Crimes are recorded (we had looked at Command and Control in a previous week, but I don't remember if I wrote about it). We talked about ORCs, and our involvement in Crime Recording, but nothing too strenuous. We were meant to do another lesson on Dynamic Risk Assessment training, but our Trainer soon found out that we'd already done this at weekend one! We covered a 40 minute lesson in about 5 minutes. Some time during the morning, our certificates for Attestation had been set out on our chairs in the Hall, and we headed down to sign them. Our Batons and Cuffs had been left for us as well, and I'm sure for about 30 minutes all I could hear was the sound of Batons being racked and collapsed! Unfortunately, we missed out on a bit of a walk around outside after lunch because it started to snow. Instead, we practised Safe Stopping (of Vehicles) in the classroom, all stood in our Flo' jackets making strange symbols at each other. Again, this only helped break the tension and we had a good chuckle around the room. I noted at about this point during the day that time had started to crawl. A quick flick at the clock after what seemed like an eternity was only actually a 5 minute passage of time. After our Safe Stopping lesson was finished, we had 20 minutes or so to kick about by ourselves. Cue lots of phone calls to family and friends tracking people down! I headed down to the front of the Whitehouse to see my Parents in, and happened to bump into a Special who's based at the same nick as me. We got chatting and I found that my reputation had preceded me, thanks to a regular who took me for a ride along 2 years ago. It was nice to know that I was remembered! Back inside for our last presentation before the big event. This was taken by a Special Chief Inspector, and was a little pre-emptive chat to prepare us for what we were about to do. A lot of talk about expectations, but not just on behalf of us. There were some expectations on what the Special Constabulary would expect from us, and what we could hope to achieve. Thankfully, the SCI that took our presentation had a wealth of knowledge, and managed to break the time up with some fairly interesting stories of his past. Suddenly, the clock said 14:50 and we all sprinted to the toilet before the Ceremony began. I shan't talk much about the Ceremony itself, as I think you'll find your own experience much more enthralling if you're not entirely sure what to expect. I will say, however, that it went without a hitch, and 36 new Officers graced the books because of it. When all was done, we headed back to the Canteen for some networking, and a chance to introduce our supervisors to our families. Unfortunately, my dad has a massive gob on him, and we ended up talking to my Inspector, the Special Chief Officer Nigel Woodley, Assistant Chief Constable Richard Bennett and Special Chief Inspector Jason Morley-Smith (sp?) for about 30 minutes. It was actually a stark reminder that at the end of all things, we're all human! I found everyone that I spoke with the be quite approachable; even the Justice of the Peace who presided over the Ceremony came over and remembered me by name, and had the courtesy to ask what it was like going first. It was a refreshing way to end the weekend, before heading home with the family for Curry and a sleep. ---------- First Aid Our third weekend (not to be confused with Law Weekend 3), was our introduction to First Aid. I say "introduction", but it was fairly thorough, and is designed to give us enough to get out in the field and preserve life if the situation warrants it. You can continue your training at any point with various NCALT modules, and I believe various practical sessions are hosted at Sulhampsted every now and again. Essentially, this is a two day weekend (but you can turn up on Friday night), bulked out with death by PowerPoint. The sheer pain of this is nullified slightly by the presence of the two highly qualified and highly experienced trainers, who are also quite humorous. You'll spend almost all of day one learning about Primary and Secondary Surveys, preservation of the airway and bits of anatomy. There'll be plenty of opportunities for digression, so you'll learn bits and bobs along the way. You'll learn about Heart Attacks and Strokes, how to identify these and how to provide initial care for people suffering from these. Please; if you're squeamish go and watch some horrific films for a couple of days before you go to First Aid! Some of the pictures aren't pleasant, and as one of our trainers quite accurately said; if you can't look at it on a screen in a classroom, how are you going to deal with it out in the field? There are also some practical introductions to things like the recovery position, and the use of Automatic External Defibrillators (AEDs). Day two will expose you to the more common side of what we're likely to deal with: physical injuries to the body. Grazes, bruises, cuts, stab wounds, gunshot wounds, burns, scalds; you name it, it's probably in this day. There's slightly less work on the second day, but be ready for the two hour written exam... ---------- Officer Safety Training: Weekend One, Day One We spent the morning looking through the legislation behind the Use of Force, and who this applies to. Contrary to popular belief, anyone can use force, provided that it is reasonable; Common Law provides us with that power. You'll be required to learn three pieces of legislation from this session, verbatim. You'll spent a little time looking at conflict managements models, and when it's appropriate to use force, but more specifically, the order in which force can be used. It's hard to explain and stay away from operational information, but let's just say your Baton isn't your first point of call! After lunch we spent the morning practising various handcuffing techniques. These aren't too stressful, and are fairly easy to apply once you've remembered the steps. The problem is that we practise in "pure form," with subjects who are completely compliant, and offer no resistance. The idea is to mentally blueprint the steps, so that even if, operationally, we come across some resistance, we still remember exactly how the process should look, so that we can attempt to safely enact an arrest by opposing resistance and remaining safe. Obviously though, out on the street we wont be walking up to people that we want to arrest, that are potentially offering violence, and asking them to stretch an arm out, and wrap their other hand around their elbow... You'll learn how to cuff from four different positions; one in front, two behind and one from the floor. The cuffing position from the floor will also require you to learn how to pin people to the ground in a safe manner, being cautions of what damage you may apply to someone if you become careless. Remember; you'll have a 76 question theory exam, and a practical assessment, so if you need to take notes, feel free! Officer Safety Training: Weekend One, Day Two Today, the pain came. We spent the morning looking at escort positions; ways that we can safely control a suspect, encourage/(require) them to walk with us, and how to combat any resistance they provide. This doesn't necessarily rely on pain compliance, but you will always be in a position to apply extra restraint or pain as necessary. The two escort positions you look at are OK; the next position you take a look at has the opportunity to hurt. But, as always with training, you learn and then move on. In this case, you move on to takedowns. Now, this isn't a throw because you're always in control, and you go down with them, but you go down in such a manner that they have no choice. Let me urge you at this point: take it easy. I managed to ###### the shoulder of one of the lads on my intake, and he had a trip to Minor Injuries because of it. He was OK by the end of the day, but believe me when I say he was in pain when he was on the floor. After the rotary takedown you'll look at a linear takedown, and from both of these you'll work on the ground pin that you learnt on Day One. You'll take lunch, and then move onto more unarmed techniques, this time in the form of strikes. Now, this isn't learning how to punch people in the face and get away with it. You learn in a controlled manner, and how to strike people in a specific way. There is an element in this of learning how to knee people in the thigh, but this is a justified technique for which you must understand the consequences. There's plenty of safety considered, and you won't be allowed to actually strike someone; safety pads are involved. After the strikes section, you move on to learning about your equipment; Captor spray and your autolock baton. These are serious bits of kit, and you will face sanctions if you misuse them. Again, there's the opportunity to try it out (no, the Captor isn't active), and you'll have plenty of opportunity to ask notes. There's a small theory section on the Captor spray, but you're given a handout that covers the information suitably. Of course, if you learn best from your own notes, then feel free to take them! You'll crack on with Captor spray, and if you're lucky the cuffs will come out and you'll have a quick opportunity to practise some of the technique you learnt on Day One. After that, you'll be introduced to your Baton. More pad work will follow, and you will quite honestly go 100% into a pad that's affixed to someone's leg. ---------- Officer Safety Training Weekend 2 I've rolled the two days into the one "bulletin," as really we covered a lot of old ground and learnt little that was new. We spent much of the first morning refining our Handcuffing techniques, before moving through Baton work, strikes, takedowns and everything mentioned in weekend one. The "horror," is that Saturday afternoon brings about your practical assessment. This will cover most, but not all, of what you were taught, and be prepared for little curve-balls. They won't ask you anything that wasn't taught, but make sure that if you only pay half attention to weekend one that you really work your backside off on the morning of Saturday two. You'll be assessed individually on the handcuffing techniques, pressure points and strikes, and assessed as a group for your baton work. Don't be too worried; if you don't quite meet the expected standard on the afternoon here, then you'll be provided with another opportunity on the Sunday morning, alongside an opportunity to practise what you weren't sure on. All I will suggest is that you think before you do, and remember the basic rules of handcuffing. If you've paid close attention at weekend one, then you'll have no problems whatsoever. That's pretty much it for day One, with the exception of a few minutes exposure to your DPV, and you'll be checked over to make sure yours fits. Day two is theory exam time. And yes, I'm serious (this time). 61 questions of terror in 6 sections. In one of these sections you must score 100%, or you'll be retaking that section. However, you have an hour to do it in. Most people in our class finished after about 40 minutes, so no real problems with time. After that, you'll get together to finalise the practical assessment pieces that weren't up to standard from the day before. This should take you to around midday, at which point it may be lunch time. After lunch, you have a more in depth exposure to searching; your search from prone is mentioned as part of your handcuffing assessment, but here you'll be taught how to properly search people from the prone position. I felt a little guilty towards one lad on my intake that works for Reliance as a Jailor. I had a knuckle duster planted on me, which, surprisingly, the lad failed to find. It was then replanted, and despite his determination to find it, still failed! In his defence, it did move from where it was secreted to an area that he'd already searched, and without my doing... Later in the afternoon, you'll be introduced to the concept of SPEAR. No, you're not jabbing each other, with weapons or otherwise. I won't say too much as it'll spoil the surprise, but be prepared for a pretty strange sounding presentation with some interesting videos. After that, you'll take to the mats again and put what you've observed into some action. It's quite good fun really, and you'll be taken through it at a reasonable pace. There's a lot of talk of the instructors dressing up in FIST suits (no, not a sexual fantasy...), but we had no experience of this. I have definitely seen other intakes doing OST with an instructor in a suit, but I've no idea what they were doing! ----------- Emily1992 writes this about Cell Placements/Exists and Cell Releases: And GreenGerkin writes this about the FIST Suit: ---------- The Meet-up I received an e-mail late last week from my Special Inspector, who I shall refer to as "G." G invited myself and three other specials down to our assigned station (nearly...) for a bit of a tour around, and as a chance to meet him. There was some confusion as to why I was there, as I am due to be at a smaller station within the LPA. However, I am told that all officers who work within this LPA will start of at the station we toured, so it was a worthwhile visit anyway. We met up at the station at 1800, and had a rather informal whistle-stop tour of the station. We were introduced to our Office (yes, an Office. For specials. Get in!) and pointed in the direction of Tea making facilities (very important). We were shown the yard, the captor store, and our locker... well, it's not really a room. Let's call it a Locker Fridge. Dean, Joe and Andy will understand what I mean... Anywho, it was rather a short tour, but the 30 minutes we spent gassing afterwards was well worth it. I have confirmed that I will in fact be based at the "satellite" station, and found that my Team Leader will be G's wife, who was also there. To add strangeties to the situation, she also is a "G"! ---------- In summary Four months have felt like four weeks. I really cannot believe how quickly our training has gone, and how much I've enjoyed every minute of it. I've grown quite fond of 16 people with which I share a common thought, and despite being warned that in 2 weeks we'll have forgotten each other, I think we'll all make a concerted effort for that not to happen. As of now, I am a Police Officer with Thames Valley Police, and couldn't be more proud. I have yet to hear from my Tutor (although I do know that he has my details), and have agreed to attend an LPA Training Session on my birthday (Monday). I, like all of my intake I suspect, keep feeling this unfamiliar weight in my jacket and remember what I've signed up for. And I can't wait. Please, if you have any questions for me, or my classmates, feel free to stick them in this thread, or send me a PM, and I shall do my best to see them answered. I'll consider continuing with my posts as and when they become relevant, but please don't expect a running commentary of every shift. For that, there's the "What I did on Duty" thread in General Discussion. Many thanks, Adamski
  15. An excellent post originally posted by Giraffe Special Constabulary Ranks: Image to be uploaded - SC = Crest and FIN, S/INSP = Crest, 2 bars and FIN, CO = 4 bars inside laurels. Regular Ranks: A few points of note: Specials in Surrey do not display the SC&Crowns on their uniforms. Regular Inspectors and above do not display collar numbers. The Surrey Police crest is displayed for Specials ranks up to and including Inspector, and up to and including Sergeant for Regulars. The collar number displayed is not indicative of Specials or Regulars - it's purely random. New Specials are issued the standard 'Surrey Police' hat badges, but a small number of longer serving Specials still wear a badge in the above style (obviously the badge is smaller for flat caps / bowlers. All warrant card holders have 'Surrey Police' on the badge. Longer serving officers' (Special or Regular) badges are topped by a silver crown (like above), and officers who joined (or got a replacement hat) in the last <5 years get a gold crown at the top (this also applies to the badge in warrant card holders). The uniform/equipment for Special Constables (all personal issue) is as follows: 1 x Warrant Card 1 x Warrant Card Holder (Leather Wallet with badge) 1 x Name Patch (velcro attaches to stab vest) 1 x Pocket Note Book 1 x ASP Baton (21 inches) 1 x CS Incapacitant Spray 1 x Handcuffs + x2 short cuff keys 1 x Airwave Radio + earpieces 1 x Equipment Belt 1 x Gloves (leather) 1 x Chequered Flat Cap (male officers) 1 x Chequered Bowler Hat (female officers) 1 x Helmet (Custodian) (male officers) 1 x National Fleece 1 x National Jacket (hi-vis) 1 x Reflective Slipover 1 x White Shirt (short sleeve used for training) 1 x White Shirt (long sleeve used for attestation and ceremonies) 2 x Black Shirts (short sleeve, long sleeve can be requested on Borough) 1 x Cargo Trousers (for training, and duties) 1 x Cap Cover (male officers) 1 x CS Holder 4 x Epaulette's (Pairs) 1x pair of Epaulette slides 1 x Black Clip-on Tie (cravats are no longer issued to female officers) 1 x First Aid Pouch 1 x ASP Baton Holder 1 x Pocket Torch 1 x Torch Clip 1 x Speedcuff Pouch 1 x Body Armour 1 x Body Armour Holdall 1 x PSU Holdall As with everything there are exceptions, but generally it's as above. A big thanks also to abdesignuk for providing the above list. The kit list has been updated to reflect the changes from 1st January 2011. Female officers are now issued with a tie. Magnum boots are no longer issued, instead SC's may claim up to £50 via the normal expenses procedure to purchase their own choice of suitable boots.
  16. Here's a thread to discuss pay made to Special Constables and Volunteers.   You can discuss anything relating to Payment, bounty's, expenses to the volunteers in the Police service.  Discuss what you already get, what you would like to get, what you think you should get, what you've heard others get.....you get the picture.     Frankly, after my pay doubled on promotion to S/Insp I have no complaints.  Of course, double nothing is still nothing, and I never wanted any pay for the role, I was even reluctant to claim expenses for a while until I was convinced to do so for budgeting reasons.   Go for it.
  17. Special Constables are to be invited to join the Police Federation as full subscribing members after a favourable vote at the body's Annual General Meeting. The conference motion stated Specials wanting to join will be "required to pay the same rate of subscription to the voluntary fund as serving officers in order to access the full range of membership services." This currently stands at £21.58 a month. John Apter, chairman of Hampshire Police Federation, said: "Today we have made the right decision. As a former Special Constable and somebody who can see the real benefit our Special Constable colleagues bring to policing it is right and proper they are welcomed as Federation members. "Special Constables are an integral part of our business, they carry a warrant card and provide invaluable support to our members. This is a great result and one I am proud to support." There are presently some 18,000 Special Constables in England and Wales. Only 12.5 per cent of Special Constables responded to a federation online survey last year asking whether they wanted to join the Staff Association. Of those that responded 2,356 (94 per cent) said they would choose to become a member of the Police Federation. Earlier in the conference, Ian Miller, a City of London Police Special and a member of the Association of Special Constabulary Chief Officers (ASCCO), said that this low turn out was possibly a reflection of the fact that the conference has consistently voted no to allowing specials to join. "I don't think the vote was a true picture," he said. "They are aware of the 'no' vote from the last conference and when it is discussed among Specials there is a feeling that 'they wont vote for us anyway.'" DCC Michael Banks, from Durham Police, who leads nationally on Specials, told the conference that volunteer officers worked four and a half million hours for the police service last year. This was the equivalent of £75 million in manpower costs. So what's your thoughts? Would you consider joining the Police Federation and having the luxury of all the protection for the legal services , representation for your welfare and of course a free diary each year ?
  18. rosco

    Wiltshire Cadets

    Just to let any casual browsers know: Wiltshire does have a Cadet scheme. http://www.wiltshire...ets-scheme.aspx
  19. Northumbria Police are now recruiting for Special Constables.  Becoming a Special Constable is an excellent opportunity to learn more about the role of a Police Officer and Northumbria Police.  http://www.northumbria.police.uk/about_us/work_for_us/volunteers/special_constable/apply/index.asp
  20. Bobbie

    Uniform/Gear/PPE

    Uniform Guild  Street Uniform  Helmet/Bowler Black wicking shirts Fleece/High vis coat/Soft shell   Black police trousers with belt Stab vest PPE (Either on a belt or stab vest Boots  Classroom/office based uniform  White shirt Tie/Cravat Fleece Black Police trousers with belt Boots/shoes   Ranks/Grades  Special Constable  This is were you all start off, out on the ground at the sharp end.  Special Sergeant/Section Officer  A Special Sergeant/Section Officer looks after a group of other Special Constables, someone who you can talk to and ask advice. Normally a experienced special.   Special Inspector  A special Inspector is the lead Special Constable on the LPU and is tasked with ensuring the officers under them are performing as required and acting as a representative/voice with the LPU senior management team. Normally reports to the LPU Chief Inspector.        Â
  21. Officers within the Metropolitan Police have access to free travel around the capital.  This is split into two parts; the ATOC agreement and the TFL concession. TFL Concession All police officers in the Metropolitan Police are entitled to free travel on TFL run services as a concession gifted by TFL/The Mayor.  This includes all special constables in the MSC and all regular police officers.  This travel used to be available on production of a warrant card, however all officers have now been issued with a Police Oyster Card which must be used.  If you don't have an oyster card, I'm afraid you have to pay.   This concession allows travel on; Tube London Buses (i.e. Buses operated by TFL;  in the border lands there may be non-TFL buses which do not fall under this concession) Croydon Tramlink Docklands Light Railway London Overground (services operated on behalf of TFL by LOROL.  This is not the same as mainline/National Rail services) ATOC Agreement The Metropolitan Police has an agreement with the Association of Train Operating Companies that creates "free" travel on National Rail services that run within a 70 mile radius of Charing Cross.  This agreement is actually paid for by the Metropolitan Police, and so is a benefit in kind, and so eligible officers must opt into the scheme and costs a small amount each month.  This scheme is only open to regular police officers who were in service in August 2013.  It is not open to special constables and is not open to new constables.  Travel is available on the production of a warrant card and a highly professional looking piece of laminated paper.   This agreement allows travel on; National Rail within a radius of around 70 miles (ish) from Charing Cross; Map A word of warning If you are not a member of the ATOC scheme and you are caught travelling on a mainline train, you will be considered to be a naughty boy/girl and if you do manage to avoid prosecution for either the crime of fare evasion or the bylaw offence of ticketless travel, you will likely be subject to an immediate cessation of chocolate rations and will be invited to an interview without coffee from which you will likely leave with your pockets slightly lighter.

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