Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'police specials'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • News
    • UK Policing News
    • Police Oracle Features
    • Real World News
    • Foreign Policing News
  • General Policing
    • General Policing Discussions
    • Police Officer & Special Constable Recruitment
    • Specific Interest
    • Force Specific Communities
    • Scenario City
    • Tackleberry
  • Verified Members
    • In The Job
  • VIP Members
    • The VIP Executive Lounge
    • The Think Tank
    • Downloads Library
  • Resource Centre
    • Download Library
    • It's The Law
    • What I Did On Duty - Discussions
    • Info Library
  • Police Videos & TV Shows
    • Clips
    • TV Programmes
  • Policing Family
    • PCSO
    • Police Staff
    • Police Volunteers
    • Policing Outside the UK
  • Off Duty
    • The Back Yard
    • The Locker Room
    • The Other Half!
    • Marketplace
    • Clubs, Groups and Teams
    • Game Zone
    • Competitions
  • Police Community Forum Help & Support
    • Guests Click Here
    • Police Community App
    • Forum Information & Help
    • New Member Introductions
    • Forum Sponsors

Blogs

  • Police Community News
  • What I Did on Duty... Finally
  • jamieMET - "What I Did On Duty" East London Borough
  • Major Disaster at large
  • Following the Thin Blue Road
  • Hire Professional Business Attorneys from Renowned Law Firm of Kansas City
  • Tempo's Special Blog
  • Becoming a PC - My Blog
  • ForceHQ
  • HPE - What I Did on Duty
  • Newb special on response
  • Policing Version 2015
  • What duties may have occurred...
  • What I Did on Duty? Otee
  • Will - What I did on duty
  • A Probie's Diary
  • The View From The Lateshift
  • DB11's Duties
  • doc4eva
  • Ride-alongs
  • Free access to PNLD
  • Fun with Animals while on Patrol
  • IPLDP (Training for the regs!)
  • Becoming a Special
  • Beat Bobby
  • A hypothetical Day in the life...
  • From Barmaid to Rookie - Recruitment & Training
  • Happy Valley PCSO Blog

Categories

  • General Public Downloads
    • Specials Impact Magazine
    • Volunteering Matters Magazine
    • Police Community Artwork
  • Resource Library
    • Forms
    • Guides
    • Useful Information
    • Userbar Library

Categories

  • Special Constables
    • Recruitment
  • Police Officer
    • Recruitment
  • Competency Framework
  • Policing Professional Framework (PPF)

Categories

  • Member of the Month

Categories

  • Recruitment Status

Calendars

There are no results to display.


Found 14 results

  1. Hello all!   Welcome to the 31st October 2014, and the day that we are opening the doors on Police Community to you all, at some point in the next 12 hours!   Please use this topic as the general MetChat thread within this area of the forum!   Looking forward to seeing some new / old user names posting in here!
  2. Just wanted to get an update as to what individual forces allow with regard to driving in the special constabulary. The old table is a a few years out of date - I know a few forces have new policies now. Here's a survey for you to complete if you like. I'll collate the responses into a snazzy table. Mods: Wasn't sure whether to put this in the specials recruitment forum or not. Please move if you think necessary.
  3. A strange and regrettable decision has been taken by the British Transport Police. Today’s Sun on Sunday reports that it has decided to dispense with the services of two special constables, David Davies, the MP for Monmouth, and Philip Hollobone, the MP for Kettering.   Our legislators are often accused of being cut off from ordinary people. It is to Davies and Hollobone’s credit that between them, they have accumulated 15 years’ service as specials: a form of public service very different to being an MP, and certainly a way of experiencing the world from a different angle.   Last year, a new code of ethics was introduced for police officers, which says they “must not take any part in politics”. But chief constables are allowed to exercise discretion in individual cases. It seems, to say the least, a great pity that Paul Crowther, chief constable of the British Transport Police, did not decide to keep Davies and Hollobone.   It happens that the two MPs concerned are Conservatives: but the Sun On Sunday reports that Brian Donohoe, the Labour MP for Central Ayrshire, who is himself a former special, has described the chief constable’s decision as “a mistake”. Mike Penning, the policing minister, has urged a re-think, while Davies himself has said he did not want to leave.   No police officer, whether full-time or part-time, should allow his party political convictions to affect the way he carries out his duties, but there is absolutely no suggestion that these two MPs were doing so. It is ridiculous and unjust to imagine that parliamentarians are unable to behave in a strictly unpartisan manner when carrying out roles which require such conduct. Even at Westminster, they quite often have to do that.   It is no good accusing MPs of being cut off, and then stopping them from serving as specials. This decision should be reversed.   http://www.conservativehome.com/parliament/2015/01/davies-and-hollobone-should-be-reinstated-as-special-constables.html   I posted the above article rather than the BBC one http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-30768583 as they have not quit as the BBC states but rather been asked to resign. Also this article provides more discussion and opinion for us to comment on.
  4. I've just come back (early) from a shift where I was not happy with the behaviour or the regular officer I was crewed with on response. Basically, the officer I was with completely ignored me for the whole time. I attempted to give an input, but was net with one word answers. Clearly he did not think highly of specials. I have a fairly thick skin so I'm not too bothered about this. You can't get on with everyone. What worried me is the officer's lack of action throughout the shift. There were 3 Grade A's which came in where no other units were available, and each time we were available and the other guy refused to shout up. One of them was only a couple of streets away and control had to pull a unit from a town 15 miles out. There was another instance where he shouted up for a Grade B as backup, but didn't even bother going to it - I assume in a effort to get the callsign on the CAD and not get called upon for any other jobs. I'm not happy with this behaviour and I feel that I should report it. My question is should I speak to my specials supervision, a regular sergeant or professional standards?
  5. Just out of interest, are there any Detective Special Constables out there anywhere, as I know some specials can specialise.
  6. Here's one for you folks... How many Special Constables does it take to change a lightbulb.... Eh hang on wrong question With all of the austerity cuts that affect the servuce at the moment many departments have been reduced in size. I know our Roads Policing Unit has sustained a number of cuts with staff who have either retired , not replaced or alternatively moved back to district policing. To some degree not completely their places have been back filled by the use of Special Constables which in the case if my force is a new move towards further integration of regs and specials in specialised areas, where previously they were predominantly working within neighbourhood policing roles. Now ours haven't been given the authority to drive the RPU vehicles but in time this might change but it's early doors. I just wondered what it's like in other forces really. Does your force provide opportunities to specialise in RPU for instance and if so, what's your role like. Do you have greater freedom. What do you actually do or allowed to do. I'd be interested to know your thoughts. Thanks folks.
  7. More than 600 people have applied for the Fast Track programme in forces across England and Wales which will see exceptional candidates reach the rank of inspector in three years.   The programme, which is still open to police staff, graduates and police specials to apply, has received 657 applications across 27 police forces.   Of those, 361 are male and 296 are female. This includes 55 black or minority ethnic candidates.   Fast Track is an accelerated three-year promotion and development programme which gives the most talented graduates the skills, knowledge and experience to advance to the rank of inspector from police constable within three years.   The application process is still open for police staff, graduates and specials and you can apply online through a dedicated website.   Candidates will be expected to tackle danger head on while other members of the public turn away. They will have to justify and account for their actions to ensure they are working ethically, proportionally and to the standards the public expect.   The programme is a blend of classroom learning delivered at regional training centres, and operational training and development in the force where they have applied. Candidates will be supported to learn what it takes to become a police officer and to quickly put that learning into practice.   Chief Superintendent Nicola Dale, who leads the fast track programme at the College of Policing, said: “This is really about the high calibre candidates because it is such a significant challenge to become an inspector after just three years. “The high number of applications reflects the interest that police staff, graduates and specials have to seek a career in the highly demanding role of an inspector.   “Potential candidates have until Friday to apply and I would encourage them to work carefully through the self-selection questionnaire and high potential development tool which are on the website.”   Successful candidates will begin training in September 2015.   Fast Track also opened in October this year for serving constables to accelerate to the rank of inspector. Most forces have now closed their application windows, but officers are advised to check with the force they wish to apply to. The programme will reopen in 2015.   Notes to Editors On Friday, 12th December 2014 Chief Superintendent Nicola Dale held a Q&A with interested candidates on Twitter from 1-2pm. You can view the answers given by searching #fasttrack and viewing the College of Policing timeline @CollegeofPolice The forces taking part are:   Avon & Somerset Constabulary Bedfordshire Police British Transport Police Cambridgeshire Constabulary Cheshire Constabulary Dyfed Powys Police Essex Police Kent Police Greater Manchester Police Hertfordshire Constabulary Humberside Police South Yorkshire Police Metropolitan Police Service Norfolk Constabulary Suffolk Constabulary North Wales Police Northamptonshire Police Northumbria Police Staffordshire South Wales Police Surrey Police Sussex Police Thames Valley Police Warwickshire Police West Mercia Police West Midlands Police West Yorkshire Police   About the College of Policing:   The College of Policing is the professional body for policing. It sets high professional standards to help forces cut crime and protect the public. The College is here to give everyone in policing the tools, skills and knowledge they need to succeed. The College of Policing will enhance the ability of police forces and individuals to deliver their mission of preventing crime and protecting the public.   The College of Policing will:   • Set standards • Promote evidence-based good practice • Accredit training providers • Support partnership working • Lead on ethics and integrity View the full article
  8. “YORKSHIRE born and bred”: it’s an often heard remark that sums up the strong sense of identity that is felt in this, our unique part of the country. It’s used by many who, like me, left for places further afield and then came home again. In my case it was a return to policing rural Yorkshire after 10 years in the Metropolitan Police. I returned to Yorkshire because my heart is here. I was lucky to be able to police the communities and places I have a strong attachment to. Today I speak to police officers the length and breadth of Yorkshire on a daily basis. Many, like me, are born and bred in God’s Own County. If you listen to the almost daily media stories about our police, you would be led to believe that they are all corrupt, and doing a terrible job. They aren’t. Don’t get me wrong, policing in Yorkshire has had its fair share of criticism and in some cases rightly so. The historic failings associated with the Miners’ Strike, Hillsborough, Savile and Rotherham have impacted on public confidence and it is only right and just that those responsible for any wrongdoing or inaction should be held to account. What we must recognise is that the vast majority of police officers across North, West, South Yorkshire and Humberside had no involvement in these events. Some weren’t even born when they took place. I always take the view that we need balance. For 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the men, women and civilian staff of our police forces in Yorkshire are quietly getting it right. This unrecognised work and commitment is something very dear to me and I bend over backwards to highlight the hard work, bravery and dedication that often escapes the mainstream media. Being open and honest to the public about getting it wrong is called “transparency”. Getting it right is an expectation that we deserve from our police service. I personally think that promoting their day to day achievements and successes is something that the police could do much better, and in my own way I try to redress the balance. Believe me, there are far more incidents of getting it right than there are of getting it wrong. Only recently, and a matter of days after a sterling police investigation saw the conviction of the youth who murdered Leeds teacher Ann Maguire, I saw criticism in the media of how scruffy some Yorkshire police officer uniforms were. Once again the pendulum swings from good to bad in a heartbeat. Before you snipe at scruffy police officers, you must remember that the police operate in an environment of procurement and tendering for uniform and kit. Faced with decimating cuts and huge financial constraints, it’s no surprise that their uniforms often come from the provider who bid the lowest price. You get what you pay for, as they say. A recent example of getting it right in Yorkshire was the hugely successful Tour de France, a major policing operation not only in terms of security but also in terms of making it run safely and smoothly. Because it wasn’t a high-profile crime investigation the efforts of the police went largely unnoticed, but the fact is they were tasked with enhancing the reputation of Yorkshire. They rose to the occasion magnificently. They excelled at dealing with people face to face, re-affirming the unique relationship that they have with the public in this country – the “tradition of trust”. Maintaining this tradition is at the heart of the service and it is best done by visible policing which means police officers connecting with the public they serve. Swingeing cuts have led to the loss of hundreds and hundreds of police officers with yet more to come over the next few years. It is manifestly unfeasible to expect the same level of visibility in our communities, particularly rural parts. Inevitably the village bobby and the police station in the town have nearly all but disappeared. Police chiefs are desperately trying to maintain a police presence in the rural communities with only handfuls of police officers and PCSOs. I spoke in Cumbria recently, another rural force. A local town police station had had to be sold off and was now one of a chain of cheap and cheerful pubs. It’s almost heartbreaking. I do worry for the future of the multiple forces in their current form and wouldn’t be surprised if the next few years saw an amalgamation into one large Yorkshire region force. Although I see the benefits, my concern is that it is crucial to maintain that local link. In 2015 and beyond I want to see greater co-operation between our four forces. Make the most of each other’s skills and assets, with the ability to move resources across borders to identify and tackle crime hotspots. We need to build up our volunteers who work with our farm watch and country watch schemes, having dedicated points of contacts within policing and having better methods of receiving and sharing intelligence, again cross-border. I’d also like to see the expansion of our special constables right across the Yorkshire forces, in particular concentrating on retention and making best use of any specialist skills they bring with them. Why have a computer expert on the books, and not have them working on complex issues such as cyber crime? Another area which can be improved is making smarter use of social media. It’s clear to me from my own use of Twitter that I can very often find out what our police are doing in Yorkshire and elsewhere, long before it hits the mainstream media. With real police officers posting messages about what they’re doing, it brings out the human side of policing, and a better understanding of what they do. Finally I would urge our four police crime commissioners and chief constables to place officer and staff morale at the top of the agenda. The constant bad press weighs heavily on those very men and women we turn to when things go wrong, and are often left having to make life-changing decisions. I’m also working hard in 2015 to highlight the exceptional work the 99.9 per cent of our police service do daily. I wish you all a safe and happy Christmas. • Mike Pannett is a retired police officer and author of A Likely Tale, Lad, published by Dalesman Publications, price £14.99. http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/debate/columnists/mike-pannett-quiet-commitment-deserves-our-respect-1-7002247 Good article, not sure about the advert
  9. So Special Constables are not allowed to be members of the Police Federation? I read somewhere that there was a debate last year and it was agreed in principal that Specials could join but nothing moved forward from that. The real question here is if a Special Constable needs legal representation for a Constabulary related matter who does he/she turn to? A private Solicitor which will obviously cost! Are we really this under represented considering that we are open to the same disciplinary procedures as our regular colleagues. I agree that we should be subject to the same disciplinary procedures but also think that we should be afforded some sort of legal representation. Does anyone have thoughts on this or an answer to be legally represented should we need to be?
  10. West Midlands Police Police Constable - Status: Closed (last updated 16-Jun-2017) Recruitment is about to open for Police Constables - West Midlands PC Recruitment page. Special Constable - Status: Closed (last updated 16-Jun-2017) Recruitment is currently closed for Special Constables. PCSO - Status: Closed (last updated 16-Jun-2017) Recruitment is currently closed for PCSOs - West Midlands PCSO Recruitment page. Police Staff - Status: Open (last updated 16-Jun-2017) There are currently a number of vacancies, however, this changes regularly, please visit Current Vacancies for the latest. Please post to the Recruitment thread if you know of any news on recruitment.
  11. Hi everyone, Really excited to be part of this new forum as it starts its life! But I have one small issue, which has been discussed over and over at the other place, and that I'd appreciate some consideration being given to changing. The forum banner, and in some other places, talks about 'Police Officers' and 'Special Constables' as if they're different things. As the argument's been done to death, and with general agreement that the distinction is unhelpful, please can we change this to 'Regular Officers' / 'Special Constables'? Or just 'Police Officers'? Thanks
  12. Here's a thread to discuss pay made to Special Constables and Volunteers.   You can discuss anything relating to Payment, bounty's, expenses to the volunteers in the Police service.  Discuss what you already get, what you would like to get, what you think you should get, what you've heard others get.....you get the picture.     Frankly, after my pay doubled on promotion to S/Insp I have no complaints.  Of course, double nothing is still nothing, and I never wanted any pay for the role, I was even reluctant to claim expenses for a while until I was convinced to do so for budgeting reasons.   Go for it.
  13. Special Constables are to be invited to join the Police Federation as full subscribing members after a favourable vote at the body's Annual General Meeting. The conference motion stated Specials wanting to join will be "required to pay the same rate of subscription to the voluntary fund as serving officers in order to access the full range of membership services." This currently stands at £21.58 a month. John Apter, chairman of Hampshire Police Federation, said: "Today we have made the right decision. As a former Special Constable and somebody who can see the real benefit our Special Constable colleagues bring to policing it is right and proper they are welcomed as Federation members. "Special Constables are an integral part of our business, they carry a warrant card and provide invaluable support to our members. This is a great result and one I am proud to support." There are presently some 18,000 Special Constables in England and Wales. Only 12.5 per cent of Special Constables responded to a federation online survey last year asking whether they wanted to join the Staff Association. Of those that responded 2,356 (94 per cent) said they would choose to become a member of the Police Federation. Earlier in the conference, Ian Miller, a City of London Police Special and a member of the Association of Special Constabulary Chief Officers (ASCCO), said that this low turn out was possibly a reflection of the fact that the conference has consistently voted no to allowing specials to join. "I don't think the vote was a true picture," he said. "They are aware of the 'no' vote from the last conference and when it is discussed among Specials there is a feeling that 'they wont vote for us anyway.'" DCC Michael Banks, from Durham Police, who leads nationally on Specials, told the conference that volunteer officers worked four and a half million hours for the police service last year. This was the equivalent of £75 million in manpower costs. So what's your thoughts? Would you consider joining the Police Federation and having the luxury of all the protection for the legal services , representation for your welfare and of course a free diary each year ?