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Found 39 results

  1. Hello all!   Welcome to the 31st October 2014, and the day that we are opening the doors on Police Community to you all, at some point in the next 12 hours!   Please use this topic as the general MetChat thread within this area of the forum!   Looking forward to seeing some new / old user names posting in here!
  2. This is the current uniform issued to Special Constables in A&S. If this changes, please leave a comment and I will update the list. Likewise, if someone can provide me with a list of uniform issued to regulars then I will update this original post. At the start of training you will be issued with: x2 White Shirts (long or short sleeve) x2 Black Trousers x1 Police Fleece x1 High-Vis Coat x1 High-Vis Tabbard x1 High-Vis Trousers x1 Pair of Leather Gloves x1 Custodian and x1 Patrol Cap (Male) x1 Bowler Hat (Female) x2 Sets of Epaulettes x2 Sets of Collar Number Slides x1 Clip-On Black Tie x1 Trosuer Belt x1 A&S PNB Cover x1 LED Lenser Torch in pouch x1 Duty Belt with the below pouches: BatonCS SprayHandcuffsSmall Medical PouchLarger Document PouchDuring training, you will be issued with: x1 Stab Vest x1 21" ASP Baton x1 Handcuffs with key x1 Radio Case x1 Radio Earpiece (G Shape) x1 Set of Limb Restraints in a pouch x1 Resuscitation Shield Boot allowance is £75. You are expected to have all kit avaliable to you for each module.
  3. Hi guys, so I thought I'd move over the thread I created originally on PS.com and bring it over here, enjoy! CKP in general: Information taken from College of Policing website. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CKP regarding Metropolitan Police: Do I need CKP to join as a Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police? Yes, if you want to become a Police Constable with us then yes, you will need CKP with one of the approved providers that can be found through the College of Policing website. You will need to have COMPLETED the KFC course prior to starting training. Will the CKP guarantee me a job as a Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police? No. You will still need to pass Day 1, Day 2, Vetting/References AND Training. Remember CKP does not guarantee you a job, it just makes you eligible to start training. Do I need CKP to join as a Police Constable if I am a Special Constable with the Metropolitan Police? Nope, you don't need CKP if you are in the Metropolitan Special Constabulary to join as a Police Constable with the Metropolitan Police. I am a Special Constable with another force, do I need the CKP to join as a Police Constable in the Metropolitan Police? Yes. This is because if you are with another force you are deemed as an external candidate. There are no rumours or any news of this changing any time soon and I think this will probably stick. Will the Metropolitan Police be getting rid of the CKP? Not for the foreseeable future. If you have heard rumours, please for god sake ignore them. If anything official is released I'm sure it will be on the Metropolitan Police website and here. Will the Metropolitan Police providing funding for the CKP? I believe if you are a successful candidate in passing the SEARCH assessments then the funding comes in the form of an interest free loan, paid back from your wage once you're in service. However, confirm this with MetHR as there could be certain requirements and/or the information could have changed. I have already attained a SEARCH assessment pass in the last 2 years, do I still need the CKP? Oh yes. I have attained the PLC in the last 3-4 years, do I still need to do the CKP? As it stands, and as far as I'm aware you will not have to do the CKP - but like most things, I would confirm this with MetHR. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- These are all the questions I could think of. If you have any more questions, please ask below. If anyone thinks I am missing any information or any information is incorrect please add below and I will add or correct . As it stands, this is a thread for External Met PC applicants. Hope this helps! Useful links: College of Policing Metropolitan Police Careers Bluelight Other approved providers
  4. Just wanted to get an update as to what individual forces allow with regard to driving in the special constabulary. The old table is a a few years out of date - I know a few forces have new policies now. Here's a survey for you to complete if you like. I'll collate the responses into a snazzy table. Mods: Wasn't sure whether to put this in the specials recruitment forum or not. Please move if you think necessary.
  5. We are pleased to announce that we are currently recruiting for Special Constables to work at locations across the Force area. Follow the links below to find out more about becoming a Special Constable with West Yorkshire Police. New : Are you a Student? Could you join us and #BeSpecial? Find out more here. Special Constable - Blog http://www.westyorkshire.police.uk/bespecial
  6. Current Recruitment

    Surrey is currently accepting Detective Constables and Police Constables as transferees. DCs must be PIP2 accredited. PCs must be Response trained drivers. Surrey officers are eligible for a £2000 South-East Regional Allowance on top of basic salary. Closing date is 7th November 2014. They're also accepting applications for Special Constables, intake dates yet to be confirmed. Apply online here: http://www.surrey.police.uk/careers/current-vacancies
  7. Hi all, I recently applied to Hampshire constabulary and passed the first day assessment, but due to a review of their specials recruitment I won't be able proceed any further until the second half of next year. As I live in the very north east of Hampshire I was wondering about applying to Thames Valley constabulary. I'm pretty close to Reading. What is the recruitment situation like currently? Are there any issues with applying to two forces at the same time?
  8. Hi all, I was wondering if anyone else has applied for BTP Specials in Scotland? Applications are open until 5th December. Any people who have been through the application process; could you spare any advice regarding the tests and interview that will come up should I pass the application stage? Cheers ML
  9. Facebook page

    Am I the only one that thinks filling the Dorset Specials Facebook page with No excuses type posts (a rolling update of number of tickets issued) is becoming a bit boring? Kind of gives a public perception that all we do is pick on motorists and issue tickets. I've emailed Vol support with several noteworthy things that have gone on at my station in the past, but they don't seem to want to post them on there. (not prepared to post them myself given my name will pop up and it's an open group)
  10. A strange and regrettable decision has been taken by the British Transport Police. Today’s Sun on Sunday reports that it has decided to dispense with the services of two special constables, David Davies, the MP for Monmouth, and Philip Hollobone, the MP for Kettering.   Our legislators are often accused of being cut off from ordinary people. It is to Davies and Hollobone’s credit that between them, they have accumulated 15 years’ service as specials: a form of public service very different to being an MP, and certainly a way of experiencing the world from a different angle.   Last year, a new code of ethics was introduced for police officers, which says they “must not take any part in politics”. But chief constables are allowed to exercise discretion in individual cases. It seems, to say the least, a great pity that Paul Crowther, chief constable of the British Transport Police, did not decide to keep Davies and Hollobone.   It happens that the two MPs concerned are Conservatives: but the Sun On Sunday reports that Brian Donohoe, the Labour MP for Central Ayrshire, who is himself a former special, has described the chief constable’s decision as “a mistake”. Mike Penning, the policing minister, has urged a re-think, while Davies himself has said he did not want to leave.   No police officer, whether full-time or part-time, should allow his party political convictions to affect the way he carries out his duties, but there is absolutely no suggestion that these two MPs were doing so. It is ridiculous and unjust to imagine that parliamentarians are unable to behave in a strictly unpartisan manner when carrying out roles which require such conduct. Even at Westminster, they quite often have to do that.   It is no good accusing MPs of being cut off, and then stopping them from serving as specials. This decision should be reversed.   http://www.conservativehome.com/parliament/2015/01/davies-and-hollobone-should-be-reinstated-as-special-constables.html   I posted the above article rather than the BBC one http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-30768583 as they have not quit as the BBC states but rather been asked to resign. Also this article provides more discussion and opinion for us to comment on.
  11. I've just come back (early) from a shift where I was not happy with the behaviour or the regular officer I was crewed with on response. Basically, the officer I was with completely ignored me for the whole time. I attempted to give an input, but was net with one word answers. Clearly he did not think highly of specials. I have a fairly thick skin so I'm not too bothered about this. You can't get on with everyone. What worried me is the officer's lack of action throughout the shift. There were 3 Grade A's which came in where no other units were available, and each time we were available and the other guy refused to shout up. One of them was only a couple of streets away and control had to pull a unit from a town 15 miles out. There was another instance where he shouted up for a Grade B as backup, but didn't even bother going to it - I assume in a effort to get the callsign on the CAD and not get called upon for any other jobs. I'm not happy with this behaviour and I feel that I should report it. My question is should I speak to my specials supervision, a regular sergeant or professional standards?
  12. I'm sure this will have been mentioned elsewhere on the site but I thought this deserved repeating in the Essex section. I'd like to add my congratulations to Derek. I've been privileged to have worked alongside him on front line duties a lot over the last year or two and he's a top-notch officer. Here's the article: --------------------------------------------------- A high-ranking special police officer has been awarded an MBE in the Queen’s New Year Honours list for services to policing. Essex Police Assistant Chief Officer of Special Constabulary Derek Hopkins, 62, has been with the force for 34 years. Mr Hopkins said: "I am, of course, extremely proud and feel honoured to have had my voluntary service recognised in this way. “I will not say that I have enjoyed every minute of my 34 years service with Essex Police Special Constabulary – the role of a police officer is often challenging, sometimes traumatic and occasionally dangerous. "I have, however, always found it very rewarding and am privileged to play a small part in an organisation that has, at its heart, people who really want to make a difference in their communities often without thanks or recognition for their enthusiasm and dedication. "I accept the award in the knowledge that it reflects the efforts of all my volunteer colleagues who work tirelessly, fitting their duties around their normal jobs and family lives, to assist full-time colleagues in delivering an enhanced policing service. "I have worked alongside some fantastic people who have always been prepared to guide me in the right direction. “I wish to take this opportunity to thank all my colleagues, past and present, for their support and friendship during my time with Essex Police. "I must also recognise that I would not have been able to devote as much time to volunteering as I have without the unwavering support of my family.” Mr Hopkins also has a long association as a Scout leader and instructor and has helped with local fundraising and social groups. Chief Constable Stephen Kavanagh said: "I am delighted for Derek and his family and extremely grateful for the continued and enduring commitment Derek provides to the force. “His drive, knowledge and sheer dedication to serving Essex on a voluntary basis is highly recognised. "Derek has dedicated almost 40 years of his life to voluntarily policing Essex, without any financial reward. This is a magnificent achievement which highlights his immense devotion to Essex Police and the public we serve. "He has made an enormous contribution to the safety of residents of Essex at considerable personal sacrifice. His vision and passion for volunteering in the county has set an outstanding example to people both in policing and outside. "Derek’s commitment to serving the people of this county and his determination in making Essex a safe county is inspiring and I would like to sincerely congratulate him on receiving this MBE.” Chief Officer Essex of Special Constabulary Leon Dias said: "I would like to add my sincere congratulations to Derek on receiving his MBE, this very public recognition of his dedication to policing and is a fitting testament to his 34 years of voluntary service to Essex Police. "I have worked alongside Derek for the past 7 years and his energy, enthusiasm and determination to make a difference within our communities is an inspiration." ----------------------------------------------- source: http://www.gazette-news.co.uk/news/11695176.High_ranking_Essex_Police_officer_from_Silver_End_awarded_MBE/?ref=rss
  13. Special DCs

    Just out of interest, are there any Detective Special Constables out there anywhere, as I know some specials can specialise.
  14. Recruitment Guide

    Hi All, Those of us who came over from the old site will (hopefully!) recall that I made a Recruitment Guide for Specials recruitment which was a pinned thread. As most of my answers made links to threads on that site I'm going to need to do quite a bit of rewriting which I've now started. However, I thought I'd post the questions here and then if anyone can think of any other topics that come up a lot in recruitment I can write answers to those as well. I'm sure there are must be more so feel free to post anything which could be dealt with here to save separate threads! Thanks all! Where can I find out about restricted occupations? Can I apply if I have a previous conviction? What is the position regarding tattoos? What should I wear to the assessment centre? What competencies are relevant to the role of a Special? Are there any tips for the interview? If I am unsuccessful, how long must I wait before trying again? Will I have to take a fitness test? What information is there about vetting? What happens at medical? What are the BMI/ eyesight requirements? What will I be issued with in terms of uniform? Can Specials drive in my force? What is the typical duty of an SC?
  15. Specials and Specialisms

    Here's one for you folks... How many Special Constables does it take to change a lightbulb.... Eh hang on wrong question With all of the austerity cuts that affect the servuce at the moment many departments have been reduced in size. I know our Roads Policing Unit has sustained a number of cuts with staff who have either retired , not replaced or alternatively moved back to district policing. To some degree not completely their places have been back filled by the use of Special Constables which in the case if my force is a new move towards further integration of regs and specials in specialised areas, where previously they were predominantly working within neighbourhood policing roles. Now ours haven't been given the authority to drive the RPU vehicles but in time this might change but it's early doors. I just wondered what it's like in other forces really. Does your force provide opportunities to specialise in RPU for instance and if so, what's your role like. Do you have greater freedom. What do you actually do or allowed to do. I'd be interested to know your thoughts. Thanks folks.
  16. Health background check

    Hello Everyone I would just like to ask, does one's Health background penalize their 'specials application' I mean I get bad hayfever, in summer and I take antihistamines, but recently I been having headaches and my GP sent me to have a MRI brain Scan I was just wondering will that show up on health check and if so will my 'specials' application get cancelled? PS Does anyone know any officers that got with an early stage 1 cancer/tumour? can you be a police officer with cancer? Thanks Tru
  17. More than 600 people have applied for the Fast Track programme in forces across England and Wales which will see exceptional candidates reach the rank of inspector in three years.   The programme, which is still open to police staff, graduates and police specials to apply, has received 657 applications across 27 police forces.   Of those, 361 are male and 296 are female. This includes 55 black or minority ethnic candidates.   Fast Track is an accelerated three-year promotion and development programme which gives the most talented graduates the skills, knowledge and experience to advance to the rank of inspector from police constable within three years.   The application process is still open for police staff, graduates and specials and you can apply online through a dedicated website.   Candidates will be expected to tackle danger head on while other members of the public turn away. They will have to justify and account for their actions to ensure they are working ethically, proportionally and to the standards the public expect.   The programme is a blend of classroom learning delivered at regional training centres, and operational training and development in the force where they have applied. Candidates will be supported to learn what it takes to become a police officer and to quickly put that learning into practice.   Chief Superintendent Nicola Dale, who leads the fast track programme at the College of Policing, said: “This is really about the high calibre candidates because it is such a significant challenge to become an inspector after just three years. “The high number of applications reflects the interest that police staff, graduates and specials have to seek a career in the highly demanding role of an inspector.   “Potential candidates have until Friday to apply and I would encourage them to work carefully through the self-selection questionnaire and high potential development tool which are on the website.”   Successful candidates will begin training in September 2015.   Fast Track also opened in October this year for serving constables to accelerate to the rank of inspector. Most forces have now closed their application windows, but officers are advised to check with the force they wish to apply to. The programme will reopen in 2015.   Notes to Editors On Friday, 12th December 2014 Chief Superintendent Nicola Dale held a Q&A with interested candidates on Twitter from 1-2pm. You can view the answers given by searching #fasttrack and viewing the College of Policing timeline @CollegeofPolice The forces taking part are:   Avon & Somerset Constabulary Bedfordshire Police British Transport Police Cambridgeshire Constabulary Cheshire Constabulary Dyfed Powys Police Essex Police Kent Police Greater Manchester Police Hertfordshire Constabulary Humberside Police South Yorkshire Police Metropolitan Police Service Norfolk Constabulary Suffolk Constabulary North Wales Police Northamptonshire Police Northumbria Police Staffordshire South Wales Police Surrey Police Sussex Police Thames Valley Police Warwickshire Police West Mercia Police West Midlands Police West Yorkshire Police   About the College of Policing:   The College of Policing is the professional body for policing. It sets high professional standards to help forces cut crime and protect the public. The College is here to give everyone in policing the tools, skills and knowledge they need to succeed. The College of Policing will enhance the ability of police forces and individuals to deliver their mission of preventing crime and protecting the public.   The College of Policing will:   • Set standards • Promote evidence-based good practice • Accredit training providers • Support partnership working • Lead on ethics and integrity View the full article
  18. “YORKSHIRE born and bred”: it’s an often heard remark that sums up the strong sense of identity that is felt in this, our unique part of the country. It’s used by many who, like me, left for places further afield and then came home again. In my case it was a return to policing rural Yorkshire after 10 years in the Metropolitan Police. I returned to Yorkshire because my heart is here. I was lucky to be able to police the communities and places I have a strong attachment to. Today I speak to police officers the length and breadth of Yorkshire on a daily basis. Many, like me, are born and bred in God’s Own County. If you listen to the almost daily media stories about our police, you would be led to believe that they are all corrupt, and doing a terrible job. They aren’t. Don’t get me wrong, policing in Yorkshire has had its fair share of criticism and in some cases rightly so. The historic failings associated with the Miners’ Strike, Hillsborough, Savile and Rotherham have impacted on public confidence and it is only right and just that those responsible for any wrongdoing or inaction should be held to account. What we must recognise is that the vast majority of police officers across North, West, South Yorkshire and Humberside had no involvement in these events. Some weren’t even born when they took place. I always take the view that we need balance. For 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, the men, women and civilian staff of our police forces in Yorkshire are quietly getting it right. This unrecognised work and commitment is something very dear to me and I bend over backwards to highlight the hard work, bravery and dedication that often escapes the mainstream media. Being open and honest to the public about getting it wrong is called “transparency”. Getting it right is an expectation that we deserve from our police service. I personally think that promoting their day to day achievements and successes is something that the police could do much better, and in my own way I try to redress the balance. Believe me, there are far more incidents of getting it right than there are of getting it wrong. Only recently, and a matter of days after a sterling police investigation saw the conviction of the youth who murdered Leeds teacher Ann Maguire, I saw criticism in the media of how scruffy some Yorkshire police officer uniforms were. Once again the pendulum swings from good to bad in a heartbeat. Before you snipe at scruffy police officers, you must remember that the police operate in an environment of procurement and tendering for uniform and kit. Faced with decimating cuts and huge financial constraints, it’s no surprise that their uniforms often come from the provider who bid the lowest price. You get what you pay for, as they say. A recent example of getting it right in Yorkshire was the hugely successful Tour de France, a major policing operation not only in terms of security but also in terms of making it run safely and smoothly. Because it wasn’t a high-profile crime investigation the efforts of the police went largely unnoticed, but the fact is they were tasked with enhancing the reputation of Yorkshire. They rose to the occasion magnificently. They excelled at dealing with people face to face, re-affirming the unique relationship that they have with the public in this country – the “tradition of trust”. Maintaining this tradition is at the heart of the service and it is best done by visible policing which means police officers connecting with the public they serve. Swingeing cuts have led to the loss of hundreds and hundreds of police officers with yet more to come over the next few years. It is manifestly unfeasible to expect the same level of visibility in our communities, particularly rural parts. Inevitably the village bobby and the police station in the town have nearly all but disappeared. Police chiefs are desperately trying to maintain a police presence in the rural communities with only handfuls of police officers and PCSOs. I spoke in Cumbria recently, another rural force. A local town police station had had to be sold off and was now one of a chain of cheap and cheerful pubs. It’s almost heartbreaking. I do worry for the future of the multiple forces in their current form and wouldn’t be surprised if the next few years saw an amalgamation into one large Yorkshire region force. Although I see the benefits, my concern is that it is crucial to maintain that local link. In 2015 and beyond I want to see greater co-operation between our four forces. Make the most of each other’s skills and assets, with the ability to move resources across borders to identify and tackle crime hotspots. We need to build up our volunteers who work with our farm watch and country watch schemes, having dedicated points of contacts within policing and having better methods of receiving and sharing intelligence, again cross-border. I’d also like to see the expansion of our special constables right across the Yorkshire forces, in particular concentrating on retention and making best use of any specialist skills they bring with them. Why have a computer expert on the books, and not have them working on complex issues such as cyber crime? Another area which can be improved is making smarter use of social media. It’s clear to me from my own use of Twitter that I can very often find out what our police are doing in Yorkshire and elsewhere, long before it hits the mainstream media. With real police officers posting messages about what they’re doing, it brings out the human side of policing, and a better understanding of what they do. Finally I would urge our four police crime commissioners and chief constables to place officer and staff morale at the top of the agenda. The constant bad press weighs heavily on those very men and women we turn to when things go wrong, and are often left having to make life-changing decisions. I’m also working hard in 2015 to highlight the exceptional work the 99.9 per cent of our police service do daily. I wish you all a safe and happy Christmas. • Mike Pannett is a retired police officer and author of A Likely Tale, Lad, published by Dalesman Publications, price £14.99. http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/debate/columnists/mike-pannett-quiet-commitment-deserves-our-respect-1-7002247 Good article, not sure about the advert
  19. So Special Constables are not allowed to be members of the Police Federation? I read somewhere that there was a debate last year and it was agreed in principal that Specials could join but nothing moved forward from that. The real question here is if a Special Constable needs legal representation for a Constabulary related matter who does he/she turn to? A private Solicitor which will obviously cost! Are we really this under represented considering that we are open to the same disciplinary procedures as our regular colleagues. I agree that we should be subject to the same disciplinary procedures but also think that we should be afforded some sort of legal representation. Does anyone have thoughts on this or an answer to be legally represented should we need to be?
  20. Hi all, I've recently had confirmation of my training (Jan 2015) and posting (Camden), so that's all good, excited blah blah blah. My problem comes in that it has now come to references, and my employer is not going to reply to said reference request until I get some answers to their concerns. I reckon I'm more likely to get a, timely, real world answer here than anywhere else. Injury. My employer is unkeen to [let me]take the risk of putting myself further into harms way, in that I'm more likely to be injured being a special in my free time, than say, walking around London. If I am injured as part of my work as a Special, they would be left without a key member of staff until I'm fit to return to work. - Whilst I know there is no simple 'answer' to this, and I've tried to point out that everyone takes risks in their personal time (getting on a plane, getting in a car, playing football, climbing a mountain), this being of a similar ilk. - Can anyone think of anything direction for me to investigate / argue, any suggestions short of "everyone takes managed risks, get over it" would be greatly appreciated. Time off. From what I've read the likelihood of time off being required in normal office hours is pretty minimal, but not impossible (the examples I've read are "####, there's a war on", and "being required to be present in court". I have tried to emphasize that this is unlikely, and either way won't just creep up on us so can be worked into hours. - There is talk of flexibility, asin I work extra hours pre-emptively to effectively bank them into a lieu folder, which would give me scope for this. This would give the potential to do the odd daytime shift too, which I guess would be good and give a better mix. - Again, any thoughts of similar arrangements or suggestions would be welcome. EPS I am going to go for my HR meeting armed with some info on this, but figure that given the current argu discussion is about being able to do this in my free time, I'm not sure I'm likely to get anything above that. - Again, any thoughts or suggestions welcome. Sorry that's so waffly. It already seems that MPS HR function is overburdened and getting this assistance from them may not be easy! Thanks for any input any of you are able to give. Stef.
  21. "West Mercia Police need more recruits urgently, says crime commissioner West Mercia Police has been urged by its crime commissioner to take urgent steps to speed up the recruitment process. Cuts in the human resources department have made it more difficult for new officers to be vetted to join the force, according to Bill Longmore. The lack of recruitment has also led to an underspend within the force’s budget, as money had been purposely held back for more front line staff, he said. Mr Longmore said cutbacks within the force, which is trying to save £30 million between April 2015 and 2018, had affected some parts of the service worse than others and there had also been a high and unexpected number of retirements. He also said he was frustrated with how long it was taking to recruit new faces at a time in which the force was facing huge change with its operational alignment with Warwickshire Police. The two forces announced in May that 140 new officers would be taken on, but Mr Longmore said progress had been slow. It is believed around 100 of the vacancies are still to be filled. “We have been going through a lot of changes over the last two years,” he said. “With West Mercia and Warwickshire being put together we have made cuts and the HR department is one area that has suffered. “One of the areas I focused on was keeping 50 community support officers and special constables. We’ve also lost a bigger number of people leaving the force through retirement than expected. “We have identified there is a shortage but the speed of the recruitment process has not been fast enough. It’s been very frustrating, especially the vetting policies that go on today, which takes time. But this has now become a matter of urgency.” Despite the underspend Mr Longmore said he did not believe money in place for new officers would betaken away by the Government at a later date. He said: “We are also addressing our underspend and it’s not money we’ve simply been sitting on. We will be looking at ways to spend this money, as well as continuing to save money, which is a sensible way of going forward.” Mr Longmore said the two forces were “a long way down the road” towards becoming a joint force but that the final decision was one for the politicians. He said: “It is whatever they decide, but all I want is whatever is best for the two areas. We’re always looking at the best way forward for the police service.” West Mercia and Warwickshire Police announced early this month staff numbers could be cut in an attempt to save an extra £30 million. The force, which has almost finished an existing three-year plan to cut spending by the same amount, which started in 2012, began a consultation on how save the additional money between 2015 and 2018. West Mercia Police is also in the process of closing 33 police stations and buildings to save £1.5 million. Chief Constable David Shaw said fundamental changes had been made to the way West Mercia police was run over the last few years. He said: “Perhaps we haven’t put enough thought into bringing new people in. “It’s got nothing to do with people not working hard enough but we just want to make sure not a single pound of taxpayers’ money is wasted.” He added: “We will be bringing new people into the force but we also want to use the resources we have better. “I am incredibly proud of our force despite the £30 million cuts. “We may have cut back a little bit far in some areas but the next phase of change will be planning where to spend the money, where to reinvest and where to bring people in. It’s our next major project and if we need use different agencies to bring new people in that’s what we will do. “We are as HR-reliant as any company because every organisation needs such people to make it work. We need IT experts and all the other aspects to help us.” Warwickshire Chief Constable Andy Parker said recruitment was now “back on track”. West Mercia Police announced this month it was opening a fresh round of recruitment to find the next generation of officers through the police cadets." http://www.shropshirestar.com/news/2014/11/28/west-mercia-police-need-more-recruits-urgently/ Thought this was interesting
  22. When I started the specials recruitment process I tried to look up a rough timescale, but could not find one anywhere. This is obviously due to individual force's, the individuals that are applying and their personal circumstances. Below is my timeline, it seems to have gone smoothly so hopefully this is an average timeline. Application form completed – mid/End of May First correspondence back to offer dates for assessment day (taken as a woohoo!) - end of June. Assessment day (Interview, Situational Judgement and Written) – mid July. Vetting Personal - End of July. Vetting Financial - End of July. Doctor’s report and eye test – end of July. Substance Misuse – Mid August. Biometric testing – Mid August. Police Medical – Mid October. Offer as a special – Start of Nov. Training starts – End of Nov. Attestation planned for – March 2015! Hope this helps anyone going through the process Woody
  23. Issued Uniform

    As I notice some of the other force forums have done it, I thought I would help out. I'm pretty sure TVP issue the following to all Special Constables: 1 x Peaked Cap (male) / Bowler Hat (female) 1 x Black Soft Shell Fleece 1 x Lightweight Long Sleeve Hi-Vis 1 x Heavyweight Long Sleeve Hi-Vis 1 x Long sleeve black wicking shirt 1 x Short sleeve black wicking shirt 2 x Black combat Trousers 1 x Black Waterproof Trousers 1 x Hi-Vis Over trousers * 1 x Pair Shoulder Boards (fold over style for wicking shirts) 2 x Shoulder Sliders (1 for DPV and 1 for soft shell) 1 x Dual Purpose Vest Holder 2 x DPV Panels for above 1 x DPV Bag 1 x Radio (Personal Issue) 1 x Radio Earpiece 1 x Radio Clip for Microphone loops on Jackets 1 x Radio Cover 1 x Duty Belt 1 x Trouser Belt 1 x PJ ILG Handcuff Holder 1 x PJ ILG 22" Baton Holder 1 x PJ ILG CapTor holder 1 x Belt KlikFast Dock 1 x First Aid Pouch (with gloves and face mask) 2 x Belt Keeps 1 x Clear Plastic PNB Cover 1 x Pair of black leather gloves 1 x Mondanock 22" Autolock Baton 1 x HiAtt Quickcuffs 2 x Short Cuff Key 1 x Warrant Card Holder 2 x TVP Badge (one for shirt / spare and one for warrant card holder) Above 5 items will be issued at OST, returned to trainers and then issued at attestation. * Hi Vis over trousers are not always issued to every SC!

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