Jump to content
Account Notice
  • To post a recruitment query in the "Recruitment Areas" or in the "Force Specific Areas" you will require a Recruitment Pass or a Membership Package. Click HERE to read more.
  • Your Account Is Currently Limited

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'police scotland'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • News
    • UK Policing News
    • Police Oracle Features
    • Real World News
    • Foreign Policing News
  • General Policing (Registered Users)
    • General Policing Discussions
    • Specific Interest
    • Clips
    • TV Programmes
    • Resource Centre
    • Tackleberry
    • The Locker Room
  • Recruitment (Membership Pass Required)
  • Verified Members
  • Premium Members (Membership Pass Required)
  • Police Community Forum Help & Support
  • Topics
  • Topics
  • Topics
  • Topics
  • Topics
  • Marketplace's Kit
  • Marketplace's Computing
  • Marketplace's Electronics
  • Marketplace's DVD CD Books
  • Marketplace's Collectables
  • Marketplace's Car Parts & Vehicles
  • Marketplace's General Buy & Sell
  • Help Me!'s Health & Wellbeing
  • Help Me!'s Pet Corner
  • Help Me!'s DIY
  • Help Me!'s Vehicles Travel & Transport
  • Help Me!'s Consumer Electronics
  • Help Me!'s Computer Software
  • Help Me!'s General Help

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

  • Membership Plans
  • Site Access Services
  • Forum Services

Categories

  • General Public Downloads
    • Specials Impact Magazine
    • Volunteering Matters Magazine
    • Police Community Artwork
  • Resource Library
    • Forms
    • Guides
    • Useful Information
    • Userbar Library

Categories

  • Special Constables
    • Recruitment
  • Police Officer
    • Recruitment
  • Competency Framework
  • Policing Professional Framework (PPF)

Calendars

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Found 38 results

  1. emanuel garcia

    Police Scotland Initial Interview

    Hi Guys, I am currently a special constable for Hertfordshire Police and I am living in London , I decided to apply for Police Scotland, passed S.E.T. and have my initial interview at the end of January - quite nervous as I am quite bad with interviews. Wanted to ask if anyone knows the questions I will or may be asked, and what should I study for the interview/expect. Any tips would be much appreciated. Want to feel more confident in passing. Many thanks
  2. Hi Guys, I am currently a special constable for Hertfordshire Police and I am living in London , I decided to apply for Police Scotland, passed S.E.T. and have my initial interview at the end of January - quite nervous as I am quite bad with interviews. Wanted to ask if anyone knows the questions I will or may be asked, and what should I study for the interview/expect. Any tips would be much appreciated. Want to feel more confident in passing. Many thanks
  3. THE top cop who claimed female firearms officers shouldn’t be on duty without a man has been unveiled. https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/scottish-news/3439671/police-scotland-firearms-female-email-row-sergeant-keith-warhurst/
  4. Police officers took almost 40,000 days off work last year due to stress-related illness. The Scottish Police Federation say some members have taken their own lives because of pressures they faced at work. https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scots-cops-anxious-suicidal-stress-13530271.amp ”Kennedy said: “One officer had a manager try to serve discipline forms on him the day after he tried to take his own life.” Did the manager know he’d tried to take his own life? If so what a ...... 😡
  5. Dizzydee

    Lego policeman

    Long time since I've posted here, but wondering if anyone can help. I'm trying to get hold of a Lego mini figure with a likeness to a typical Police Scotland/UK police officer. I've tried looking online at the likes of eBay and other sites, but can only find cops done up like SWAT or with a custodian helmet or police of different countries. Anyone got any idea where I can get something more routine?
  6. My wife's parents are potentially retiring to Dumfries in the not too distant future and the idea of transferring north of the border has come up. It would help with child care and allow us to be near them as they get older. I'm not 100% convinced by the idea but I can see the merits in moving: there would be the added bonus that I could either be mortgage-free or upgrade to a much nicer house compared with what I have in the London-area. This is a very early fact-finding stage and I'm not set on the move - indeed, before this morning I didn't even realise a transfer was possible. I'm currently a PC in the Met with nearly 8 years service. I'm in a specialised (although not too specialised!) role. Up until a year ago I was a bog-standard uniformed neighbourhood cop, before that I was a response cop. So, my questions are: - Is there anyone on here who has made the change over? How did it go? How was learning a new legal system? Was there a big culture change? - What's the Dumfries/border area like? What's it like to live? What's it like to police? I was looking at Lockerbie as it seemed to have good transport links to both Edinburgh and Glasgow (thinking about potential jobs for the wife) but also back down South. Is there anyone you would definitely not want to live/work? - What is morale like? I would imagine it is better than most forces down south. What are promotion/job prospects like for specialist roles? I currently do a very interesting, albeit niche, role and fully accept that I will have to go back to being a response or neighbourhood cop - that doesn't bother me but if there are prospects of moving into other departments a few years down the line then I'd like to: part of me sees going back to response would be something of a "backward step". I have a friend who moved to a small English force and he said that everything was pretty much "dead man's shoes" and that you would need to expect to spend 30 years in uniform. One of the benefits of the Met is the absolutely huge range of jobs available. - On a rather more silly note, how would being an English Cop in Scotland go down? Both with colleagues and with the public. I can see myself getting plenty of ribbing.... but would there be downright hostility from the "customers"? (more so than usual). - Are there any particular areas that people would recommend to live/work? - Are there any other comments or pointers anyone would make? In terms of next steps I'm weighing up my options: Police Scotland are currently recruiting transferees and I'm seriously thinking of putting in an application. It seem like a long process so I would have plenty of time for fact finding and house hunting. In the meantime I'm thinking of making a little scoping trip up there to see what I think of the place.
  7. Laura1988

    Police Scotland March Intake

    Hi everyone, I’ve just received my final offer and will be heading to Tulliallan on 26th March 2018. Just wondering if there is anyone else on here doing so and if there are any specific forum groups on the go already that I can be directed to? Thanks, Laura
  8. Complaint handling procedures at Scotland’s police oversight body are “neither effective nor efficient”, according to an audit report. https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/news/scotland/police-complaints-procedures-ineffective-and-inefficient/
  9. Allekoren

    Overtime?

    HI all, I'm currently going through the application process at the moment but I was wondering what sort of opportunity there is for overtime during probation and whether it comes with extra pay at all (and if it does, how does that work)?.
  10. MSPs have passed legislation aimed at merging railway policing north of the border into Police Scotland. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill is the first step towards the national force taking on the role of British Transport Police (BTP). There had been a lengthy debate over the plan, with police bosses warning it could be "massively complicated" and "a real challenge". The bill passed by 68 votes to 53, with the Greens backing the SNP. Labour and the Conservatives have opposed the merger and the bill throughout, and the Lib Dems - who had supported the legislation in the stage one vote in order to pursue amendments at committee stage - also voted against the bill. Look back on the stage three debate and vote on Holyrood Live The Scottish government has long wanted to integrate railway policing services into the single national force, and tabled a bill to that end in December 2016. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill confers extra powers on the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, but further legislation would be needed at Holyrood and Westminster to transfer staff, properties and cross-border policing functions. The Scottish government insists the integration will provide "efficient and effective" delivery of policing. However, there has been debate over the plan, with concerns ranging from how cross-border services would be affected to the potential dilution of the special skills of transport officers. The BTP wanted to continue providing railway policing in Scotland, but with oversight from Holyrood rather than Westminster. Chief Constable Paul Crowther warned MSPs that a merger could present a "real challenge" in replacing officers amid a "significant outflow of expertise". However, Police Scotland's Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins told the justice committee the move was not a "land-grab" by his force, saying the transition would be "complicated, but not insurmountable". 'Absolutely committed' After a series of votes on amendments during the stage three debate, Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said the "primary objective" of the move was to "maintain and enhance high standards of safety". He said the bill would improve accountability of railway policing in Scotland, and said he remained "absolutely committed" to backing staff. The Scottish Conservatives opposed the plans, with MSP Oliver Mundell describing the merger as "an ill-judged and ill-thought out idea". He added: "The list of those with concerns is almost as long as the Scottish government's list of excuses on policing matters." Image copyrightBRITISH TRANSPORT POLICE MSPs have passed legislation aimed at merging railway policing north of the border into Police Scotland. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill is the first step towards the national force taking on the role of British Transport Police (BTP). There had been a lengthy debate over the plan, with police bosses warning it could be "massively complicated" and "a real challenge". The bill passed by 68 votes to 53, with the Greens backing the SNP. Labour and the Conservatives have opposed the merger and the bill throughout, and the Lib Dems - who had supported the legislation in the stage one vote in order to pursue amendments at committee stage - also voted against the bill. Look back on the stage three debate and vote on Holyrood Live The Scottish government has long wanted to integrate railway policing services into the single national force, and tabled a bill to that end in December 2016. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill confers extra powers on the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, but further legislation would be needed at Holyrood and Westminster to transfer staff, properties and cross-border policing functions. The Scottish government insists the integration will provide "efficient and effective" delivery of policing. However, there has been debate over the plan, with concerns ranging from how cross-border services would be affected to the potential dilution of the special skills of transport officers. Image captionTransport Minister Humza Yousaf said the government had "listened closely" to concerns about the plans The BTP wanted to continue providing railway policing in Scotland, but with oversight from Holyrood rather than Westminster. Chief Constable Paul Crowther warned MSPs that a merger could present a "real challenge" in replacing officers amid a "significant outflow of expertise". However, Police Scotland's Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins told the justice committee the move was not a "land-grab" by his force, saying the transition would be "complicated, but not insurmountable". 'Absolutely committed' After a series of votes on amendments during the stage three debate, Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said the "primary objective" of the move was to "maintain and enhance high standards of safety". He said the bill would improve accountability of railway policing in Scotland, and said he remained "absolutely committed" to backing staff. The Scottish Conservatives opposed the plans, with MSP Oliver Mundell describing the merger as "an ill-judged and ill-thought out idea". He added: "The list of those with concerns is almost as long as the Scottish government's list of excuses on policing matters." Image captionThe bill was passed by 68 votes to 53 Labour's Claire Baker also spoke out against the plan, warning of a loss of expertise and saying: "The Scottish government have ignored concerns of staff and unions". Her colleague Neil Bibby, who moved a series of amendments to the bill, said it was "shocking" that the government was "ignoring the views of our police officers". Lib Dem MSP Mike Russell said the merger was the riskiest of three options put forward, saying that ministers had decided that the majority of those in the policing sector who opposed the move were wrong. However, Green member John Finnie said his party would support the bill on the condition there was no detriment to staff. Commenting after the bill was approved, Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said: "With this move we are ensuring that policing on Scotland's 93 million annual rail journeys is fully accountable to the people of Scotland and our parliament. "Making this change gives our railway officers access to the specialist resources of the UK's second largest police force including, crucially, counter-terrorism capabilities." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-40404532
  11. Just thought I would update people and ask a question. So I sent off my application for police scotland specials on 22nd of august, I received a e-mail today to say that I had been invited to attend an initial fitness test up in Jackton on the 3rd november at 9 am lol. I was hoping if someone who has done it up in Jackton could tell me what to expect? They also request that I bring photo id is there like lockers there, since I dont really want to be jogging/running with my drivers licence in my pocket in case it comes out. Thanks
  12. sierragolf95

    Police Custody & Security Officer

    Hi folks, have just applied for the above position, while I know it is similar to a detention officer type role in England, could anyone give me a bit more information about it? I'm currently event security and nightclub door staff looking to explore new opportunities.
  13. RANK-and-file cops have hit out amid threats they’ll be fired unless they declare any contacts to journalists and politicians. Full Story - ScottishSun
  14. Police Scotland has outlined plans to cut officer numbers by 400 as part of its 10-year policing plan. Chief Constable Phil Gormley said recruitment levels would remain unchanged in the current year, but would begin to slow between 2018-20. He said resources would be re-directed to frontline operations, amid big financial challenges. Last December, the spending watchdog said Scotland's police service was facing a £188m funding gap by 2020-21. Mr Gormley said officer numbers had been at historic highs but said some staff had been used for corporate, rather than community roles. As part of a new strategy, Policing 2026, he said police officers would be released from corporate and backroom roles, with priority given to frontline operations and a more visible community presence. Some corporate roles will also be cut. Mr Gormley said that changing technology meant that not everyone involved in fighting crime would be a serving police officer. And he added that the workforce would be given new training to fight cybercrime. Fighting cybercrime Andrew Flanagan, chairman of the Scottish Police Authority, said action must be taken but said police officer recruitment would only be cut if approved by the SPA. He told a press conference at the launch of the new strategy: "We are anticipating a small reduction in police officer numbers through to 2020. "It would be around 400, but that would come towards the end of the period, rather than early on. "We expect police officer numbers to remain at their current level through the coming year and only gradually reduce thereafter." He added: "I must stress - we will not reduce police officer numbers until we see these productivity gains coming through. "So, actually, we are anticipating the amount of operational policing will actually increase through the period through to 2020." As part of the new strategy, people across Scotland are being invited to give their views on how Police Scotland should be shaped over the next 10 years in a 10-week consultation. Police Scotland has pointed out that patterns of crime are changing - often enabled by new technologies. The population profile is also ageing and becoming more diverse and the duty to protect the vulnerable is becoming ever more complex. It said the police service must adapt and develop its capacity and capability to maximise public safety and remain operationally and financially sustainable. Add most value The force said the new strategy would create a workforce of police officers and staff who are focused on where they can add most value to protecting and serving the public. It suggested that technology and new ways of working would lead to greater productivity and more time tackling crime and addressing issues around vulnerability. The workforce mix would also evolve as new skills and capabilities were developed. The strategy would recognise that police are dealing increasingly with vulnerable people who need medical or social care rather than law enforcement officers. Key areas in the new strategy: Prevention - tackling crime, inequality and critical problems facing communities Protection - based on threat, risk and harm Communities - focused on localism, diversity and the virtual world Knowledge - informing the development of better services Innovation - becoming a dynamic, adaptable and sustainable service Mr Flanagan and Mr Gormley announced the consultation in Edinburgh. Mr Flanagan said: "The SPA and Police Scotland have spent many months assessing the changing nature of communities and their demands on policing as well as analysing the changing nature of crime. "From a position of strength, we need to ensure that Police Scotland adapts to these changes and has the range of skills and capacity to deal with growing demand and that we do so in a financially-sustainable way." 'Must transform' He added: "Policing is a vital public service and it is essential that we listen to those we wish to serve to ensure we meet their expectations. "Through this consultation we are asking for everyone to provide their views on the approach outlined today and I would urge as many people as possible to take part." Mr Gormley said: "Policing in Scotland has gone through significant transition; it is proudly one of the oldest public services in the world. "Now the service must transform to realise and release the full benefits of being a single organisation. "Local policing will remain at the heart of what we do, supported by a wide range of specialist capabilities. "In an ever-changing world, people will continue to turn to the police service for a myriad of reasons, which means it's never been more important to understand our demand, both current and future, in order to be able deliver a service which is relevant, has legitimacy and above all maintains the trust and confidence of the public." Officers on the beat Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said Police Scotland must "embrace new approaches" and said the Scottish government had provided an enhanced £61m reform budget for 2017-18 to support the changes. "While our Programme for Government is clear about the need to consider the right mix of skills and not just overall numbers, the public will always be interested in the number of police officers on the beat," he said. "We will pay particular attention to these issues before approval of the final strategy. In all circumstances, I would expect to see the number of police officers remaining significantly above the number we inherited in 2007. "Indeed, our enhanced funding gives police the platform to invest in the wider workforce, technology and other resources to keep communities safe." He added: " I urge all those with an interest to have their say on this next phase of policing in Scotland." Anyone who wants to contribute to the consultation should submit their comments by 8 May. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-39097972
  15. Activists have accused officers from Police Scotland of a " brutal response" to protests held against the removal of a Kenyan man by Home Office services in Glasgow. Full Story - CommonSpace The protestors are complaining about the police tactics, but forget to mention that is was their own appaling behaviour which led to the police response. What did they expect to happen when they tried to block in the van?
  16. Fresh fears have been raised that cutbacks are forcing frontline police officers in Moray to spend much of their days filling-in forms instead of catching criminals. Full Story - Press & Journal
  17. Shock new figures have revealed ethnic minority applicants are being frozen out of careers as officers with Police Scotland. The Press and Journal has learned that no Pakistani, Indian, Chinese, African or Caribbean candidates were accepted to divisions in the north and north-east in the last two years. Full Story- Press & Journal The media might see it is a shock, but how can you get more ethnic minority applicants without lowering the standards?
  18. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-35840702 A man has been arrested near a Glasgow private school after he was seen carrying two machetes. Eyewitnesses said the man was wearing a balaclava and running back and forth by St Aloysius College on Hill Street at about 08:30. One police officer was slightly injured during the arrest but no members of the public were hurt. There were reports the man threatened a lollipop man and tried to attack a janitor at the Glasgow School of Art. St Aloysius has both primary and secondary school pupils. A police spokesman said: "At around 08:30 on Friday, police responded to reports of a disturbance on Hill Street in Glasgow. "A man has been arrested in connection with the incident and no members of the public are believed to have been injured. "One officer sustained a minor injury during the arrest. "Inquiries are ongoing to determine the circumstances surrounding the incident." A school spokeswoman said: "St Aloysius College can confirm that an incident did take place on Hill Street near to the school before 9am this morning. "All pupils and staff are safe as the situation was identified and quickly diffused by police. "The safety and wellbeing of our pupils is, as always, paramount and staff have met with pupils to reassure them. "The college, along with other local businesses and residents, are now assisting Police Scotland with their inquiries." A Glasgow School of Art spokeswoman said: "The Glasgow School of Art can confirm that a member of our staff did encounter the individual described, whilst parking his car near to a GSA building. "The member of staff is shaken, but unharmed." Bravo to the officers involved, can't imagine much worse than a machete-wielding maniac. Swift recovery to the officer injured.
  19. This is a documentary following US Police use of lethal force and US Police Chiefs visiting Police Scotland to learn about UK unarmed tactics after the tensions around US Police Tactics in 2015 It's very interesting.
  20. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-35574144 Police have launched a murder inquiry after the death of a woman in a flat in Aberdeen's Union Terrace. Officers were called to the property after the woman was found dead at 13:10 on Friday, 12 February. A "major investigation" is now under way, with police reviewing CCTV and conducting door-to-door inquiries. Det Supt David McLaren, from Police Scotland's major investigation team, said officers believe the woman may have worked as a prostitute. He said: "There is no doubt that this incident will raise concerns in Aberdeen and the wider community but I would like to take this opportunity to reassure the public that a significant police investigation has commenced and all efforts will be made to trace the person or people responsible. "A priority for us is establishing the woman's recent movements, identify who she may have been in contact with and ultimately determine what happened to her prior to her being found on Friday afternoon. "Investigations are at a very early stage however a line of inquiry at this time is the suggestion that the woman may have been involved in prostitution and as such Police Scotland is actively engaging with support groups nationally. "I am appealing for anyone who may have any information that would assist us with our inquiry to speak to us. We would ask that people remain vigilant and follow personal safety advice."
  21. Motoring accidents make up more than half police compensation payouts By Marc Ellison Data journalist, BBC Scotland 6 hours ago From the section Scotland Image copyright Thinkstock Image caption Solicitor Patrick McGuire said the revelation that 57% of the compensation payouts were motor-related was "shocking, but not surprising" Police Scotland handed out £350,000 over three years as compensation for road accidents involving officers, a BBC investigation has found. Since 2013, payouts have been made for a range of incidents, including where police vehicles hit a pedestrian, cyclists, parked cars, and walls. Motor liability claims accounted for more than half of the total £633,035. Police Scotland said its police vehicles did 70 million miles each year in often dangerous conditions. As well as motoring offences, payouts were also made for unlawful strip-searches and detentions. Police Scotland payouts Motoring accidents 3,500 - Police vehicles in Scotland 70m - Miles driven by police vehicles £350,000 - Payout for road accidents since 2013 Police Scotland The data was obtained through a BBC Scotland freedom of information request - made seven months ago - to Police Scotland. The force collates motor, public and employer's liability claims into individual annual spreadsheets for each of the force's three command areas. The release of the data comes in the wake of reports that cash-strapped Police Scotland is facing a "six figure" compensation bid over last year's M9 car crash which left two dead after a 101 call was mishandled. The FOI data set showed that Police Scotland paid out £358,159 - or 57% of all the 217 successful compensation payments - on motor-related claims. The three command areas showed varying claims: Western area - since 2013, successful motor claims accounted for 75% of all payouts in this area, formerly made up of the Strathclyde and Dumfries and Galloway police divisions Eastern area - one £6,700 payout was made in this area involving a passenger who was injured when a bus driver was forced to brake suddenly to avoid a police car Northern area - there were no liability payouts made in this area The compensation data reveals payments were made when a police vehicle hit a cyclist (£35,612), a pedestrian (£5,582), a wall (£930), and a parked car (£1,119). Payouts were also made where one police vehicle ran a red light causing a collision (£1,609), and another rolled into a third party vehicle (£5,237). One member of the public was compensated £221 when a police horse damaged their car wing mirror. Patrick McGuire, a partner with Thompson Solicitors Scotland, said revelations that 57% of the compensation payouts were motor-related, was "shocking, but not surprising". He said: "We expect our police officers to be highly trained in driving, and we hold them to, and expect, a very high standard of care from them. "But in my professional experience I have seen many claims over the years involving collisions." A Police Scotland spokesman said: "We have more than 3,500 vehicles which cover more than 70 million miles a year in all conditions and many of these are in high risk circumstances as our officers do their job in keeping people safe. "All drivers have to pass a police driving test in addition to holding a full driving licence before being allowed to drive a police vehicle and all new vehicles coming on to our fleet have the highest safety ratings which includes being fitted with reversing sensors, anti-skid and electronic stability control systems." 'I'm disgusted' But Mr McGuire said, despite their frequency, successfully pursuing such motor claims against Police Scotland was another matter entirely. The police's own data reveals that only 40% of all 549 closed claims since 2013 resulted in a payout. In Bo'ness, Leona Ryce's vehicle was hit at a junction by a speeding police car responding to a call - but which allegedly had not yet turned on its lights or siren. That was four years ago, and Ms Ryce has yet to receive any compensation for the incident. Image caption Leona Ryce has been trying to get compensation from Police Scotland for the last four years She said: "I had internal bleeding in my knee, I had cracked ribs, and I suffered from a few panic attacks after the crash." Ms Ryce was charged with driving without consideration but successfully challenged the charge in court. She added: "I thought right from the start they [Police Scotland] would have accepted liability, to be honest. "I'm disgusted about the way they have been about the whole thing." Police Scotland said it would not comment on an ongoing legal case. Image copyright Leona Ryce Image caption Ms Ryce took photographs of her car and the police vehicle in the wake of the accident Image copyright Leona Ryce Image caption The police vehicle following the collision with Ms Ryce's car Mr McGuire, who is now overseeing Ms Ryce's case, said this was indicative of how Police Scotland dealt with motor-related claims. He said: "The evidence we have from non-police eyewitnesses is very strong and they [Police Scotland] are relying entirely on the police officers and believing their statements entirely. "They [Police Scotland] are overly-blinkered and dangerously protective of the serving officers to the extent that they seem unwilling to look to the other possibilities and to recognise fairly compelling evidence that the officer got it wrong, and therefore to do the right and appropriate thing and ensure the victim is fairly compensated. "They should hold their officers to the highest standard, and when they get it wrong they have to know that they won't get away with that. "Certain officers, despite their degree of training, think that they are above the law, that certain rules don't apply to them." A Police Scotland spokesman denied claims of favouring officer testimony, stating that "all claims are assessed in line with an agreed process". Digging deeper into the claims data While the majority of payouts were motor-related, the remainder were largely public liability claims. Here are details on a small number of these claims that resulted in a Police Scotland payout: Claim arising from death of an individual (£65,138); Unlawful strip search (£12,622); Damage to caravan during arrest (£670); Disposal of vehicle and wrongful arrest (£5,369); Loss of a person's property while they were in custody (£252); Forced entry (£500); Disposal of jewellery (£450); Wrongful arrest due to person having same name and date of birth of a suspect (£3,000); The £633,035 paid out by Police Scotland is dwarfed by similar payments made by the London Metropolitan Police, which in 2010-11, paid out £1.8m for 205 claims. It was reported last year that Police Scotland had 'ring-fenced' £1.4m for employer liability claims - but the police force refused to acknowledge what portion of their £1bn budget was set aside for motor and public liability claims. However, Police Scotland's 2014/15 budget reported an actuarial valuation of £5,3m. All compensation payouts rose by 270% between 2013 and 2014 to £420,167, before falling to £99,271 in 2015. But in Scotland actions for personal injury claims can be submitted up to three years after gaining knowledge of the injury - meaning claims for 2015 incidents can be submitted up until 2018. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-35431060
  22. Petition 111421

    Police Scotland & VAT

    Did you know, since Police Scotland was formed it has had to pay VAT every year to the UK Government? But, the eight forces prior to its formation did not? Crazy!! Sign this petition asking the House of Commons to debate the issue, with a view to having Police Scotland and Scottish Fire & Rescue Service VAT exempt. It's only fair Scottish Police are on a equal footing with England & Wales forces and the PSNI. https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/111421
  23. http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scots-nuclear-power-plant-worker-6716601 THE staff member was marched off the premises at Hunterston B, West Kilbride, this morning after a shocked colleague raised the alarm.
  24. Police are dealing with a "serious incident" in Glasgow where a bin lorry is understood to have crashed into a group of pedestrians. Local reports say the lorry mounted the pavement and crashed into the side of the Millenium Hotel in George Square. The Daily Record newspaper says the accident happened as a crowd of Christmas shoppers were waiting to cross the road outside Queen Street station. There are understood to be fatalities and the casualties are estimated to be in double figures. The crash took place in George Square, Glasgow As many as six ambulances are at the scene, along with the police and fire service. A Police Scotland spokesman confirmed there is an "ongoing serious incident" in Glasgow's George Square close to Queen Street Station. Roads surrounding George Square, in the city centre, have been closed. A witness told Sky News that the whole of Queen Street has been cordoned off and emergency services are arriving by the minute.
  25. Police Scotland have been ridiculed for spending taxpayers' cash re-branding their helicopter in Gaelic. Nationalist MP Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh tweeted a photo of herself sitting in the helicopter which bears the name of Police Scotland in the ancient Scots language. For full story please use the following link http://dailym.ai/1Unvb1F I actually thought this was a joke at first.

About us

Police Community was originally founded in 2014 by two serving Police Officers.

In 2016 it was incorporated as a limited company called RAW Digital Media Limited and then purchased 3 other forums; Police Specials, UK Police Online and Police UK to form the largest policing discussion forum network in the UK. In 2019 the decision was taken to merge all four forums into this main form of www.police.community

Get in touch

Twitter

Facebook

    Meet The Team

  • Chief Bakes
    Chief Bakes Management
  • Chief Rat
    Chief Rat Management
  • Chief Cheetah
    Chief Cheetah Management
  • David
    David Global Moderators
  • Cuddles
    Cuddles Global Moderators
  • Fedster
    Fedster Global Moderators
  • Devil
    Devil Global Moderators
  • MindTheGap
    MindTheGap Global Moderators
  • blakey
    blakey Global Moderators
  • Techie1
    Techie1 Global Moderators
  • Sir Penguin
    Sir Penguin Global Moderators
  • Hoofing
    Hoofing Global Moderators
  • XA84
    XA84 Global Moderators
×
×
  • Create New...

WE ARE RECRUITING !!!

Check out our latest positions here at Police Community or by clicking on Jobs from the main menu, to play your part in shaping our fantastic community. This site is built on great people, why not be at the heart of what we do. Any questions just ask!