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  1. But force argues value of bypassing data-gatherers can not be 'underestimated'. Bypass: The technology allows police to sidestep encryption on personal devices Date - 8th April 2019 By - Nick Hudson - Police Oracle 1 Comment A national force is being told to take a step back from rolling out technology allowing data gathering from digital devices without using a password over concerns the approach is “harmful” to its reputation and could seriously impact victims, witnesses or suspects. MSPs have taken Police Scotland to task on trials by frontline officers, claiming they have been conducted without any human rights or equality, community impact, data protection and security assessments. Last year, the force purchased 41 cyber kiosks – laptop-sized machines able to bypass encryption on devices such as mobile phones so personal data can be read quickly. It was intended the machines would start being deployed to police stations across Scotland from autumn last year. But so far the force has been unable to use them due to a lack of clarity about the legal basis for them, and MSPs are now calling for a further delay. Police Scotland argues the “value” of cyber kiosks in helping protect the most vulnerable in society, while at the same time tackling the highly-sophisticated criminality, “cannot be underestimated”. The Justice Sub-Committee on Policing at the Scottish Parliament, which has been scrutinising the proposed use of the devices since last May, published a report on Monday recommending the scheme should be paused until greater clarity on the legal framework for their use is provided. The report was also critical of both Police Scotland for not following best-practice prior to using the devices on a trial basis before deciding to roll out their use across the country and the Scottish Police Authority for a lack of effective scrutiny and oversight. The committee found that during trials, police in Edinburgh and Stirling searched the mobile phones of suspects, witnesses and victims without undertaking the required governance, scrutiny and impact assessments. Members of the public whose phones were seized and searched were also not made aware their phones were to be searched using cyber kiosks as part of a trial. They were also not told about the implications of the search and were not provided with the option of giving their consent. Justice Sub-Committee convener John Finnie said: “The sub-committee fully supports Police Scotland’s ambition to transform to effectively tackle digital crime. “However, prior to the introduction of any new technology to be used for policing purposes, an assessment of both the benefits and the risks should have been carried out. “It appears that, in relation to the introduction of cyber kiosks, only the benefits were presented by Police Scotland to the SPA, with the known risks not provided. “The SPA, for its part, seems to have accepted the information provided with very little critical assessment. “Even the most fundamental questions, such as the legal basis for using this technology, appear to have been totally overlooked. “This sub-standard process has resulted in over half a million pounds worth of equipment sitting gathering dust. “Clearly, this is not an acceptable situation. The sub-committee wants to work with the Scottish government and the stakeholder groups belatedly assembled to consider the implications of introducing cyber-kiosks to find a solution which would provide the necessary safeguards for the use of this new technology.” Mr Finnie added any future trials on the use of the machines must be greatly improved. He said: “While the events related to the trials are in the past, the sub-committee remains concerned that this technology was used by frontline officers without any human rights, equality or community impact assessments, data protection or security assessments, and in the absence of any public information campaign. “That approach is harmful to the reputation of Scotland’s police service and potentially very serious for any victim, witness or suspect impacted by this. “Any future trials must be carried out to a far higher standard, with more due diligence and forethought.” In reply, Police Scotland Assistant Chief Constable Steve Johnson said: “Like the Justice Sub-Committee on Policing, we have received written confirmation from the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service about the clear legal basis, and robust statutory regime, for the use of this much-needed technology. “The rigorous scrutiny of this process has added significant value to the development of Police Scotland’s assurance and governance processes for the use of this necessary equipment. “As the chief constable has already made clear, there is a policing imperative for deploying the equipment to protect vulnerable victims and bring offenders to justice. “However, he has also stated that he must be satisfied that privacy and human rights considerations have been transparently and satisfactorily addressed.” He added: “The value of cyber kiosks in helping protect the most vulnerable people in society while tackling the most highly-sophisticated criminality cannot be underestimated.” SPA chairman Professor Susan Deacon said: “The committee’s consideration of this issue has been informative and the SPA will consider the report carefully and respond in due course. “The SPA has already strengthened our arrangements for the oversight of policing policy and practice and will continue to do so.” She said the SPA recognised that the proposed rollout has raised concerns regarding privacy, human rights and other legal and ethical matters. She has asked the chief constable to provide a further report to the SPA Board regarding his proposed plans for the rollout in light of the concerns raised. A Scottish government spokeswoman said: “The recommendations in this report are principally for Police Scotland and the Scottish Police Authority to action, but the Scottish government will give the report due consideration in the coming weeks. “The Policing 2026 strategy emphasised Police Scotland’s commitment to improving its cyber-capability and we welcome their ongoing commitment to further consultation with stakeholders as part of this process.” View On Police Oracle
  2. Study suggests 'emotional as well as physical nature of offending should be a crime'. Stalking: Study says it manifests itself in many guises where the criminal justice system may be failing victyims Date - 7th April 2019 By - Nick Hudson - Police Oracle 2 Comments A criminologist who carried out a study that revealed non-violent stalking can cause lasting psychological damage to victims believes designated task forces should be set up to police the behaviour in all its forms. Study author Katy Proctor says that by focusing solely on the physical risk posed by violent stalkers, it allows those who cause emotional damage to continue their behaviour. Her research suggests because the majority of behaviours individually do not constitute offending, the criminal justice system is missing a “course of conduct that creates fear and alarm”. The Glasgow Caledonian University survey of 128 victims found the actions of the stalker had an impact on all aspects of their lives, from their mental and physical health to employment and social life. Victims reported suicide attempts, anxiety, depression, a loss of confidence and feelings of isolation, while some changed jobs and moved house after being targeted. The study found almost nine in 10 victims were stalked by someone who was known to them while around a third were targeted by a partner or an ex-partner. Stalking behaviours included spying, remote surveillance, making unwanted phone calls, sending unwanted notes or letters, texts, emails and social media messages, harassment and threats of violence. Ms Proctor, lecturer in criminology and policing at GCU, who carried out the study, believes designated task forces and specialist courts should be set up to handle stalking in all its forms. She said: “There’s a danger that by focusing solely on the physical risk posed by violent stalkers, it allows those who cause emotional damage to continue their behaviour. “If we are to support and protect victims of stalking effectively, the justice system needs to recognise the potential of non-violent offenders to cause significant and long-lasting harm.” She added: “The majority of behaviours, on an individual basis, are not criminal and might not seem threatening by others. “The criminal justice system operates on an incident by incident basis, so it doesn’t easily recognise or pick up on a course of conduct. “It is the course of conduct that creates fear and alarm, and that needs to be recognised by the criminal justice system.” Study author Kay Proctor The survey found a quarter of those questioned were stalked by an acquaintance and 11 per cent by a work colleague. Just over three-quarters of those who took part were women who were stalked by men. Less than half – 49 per cent – of those surveyed reported their concerns to Police Scotland. Asked how being victimised made them feel, 83 per cent said they felt they may have done something to trigger the behaviour and 77 per cent said they felt shame. Ms Proctor stressed victims are in no way responsible and said for stalkers who are not deluded about their victim’s feelings for them it is about power and control, similar to domestic abuse. Experts are calling for specialist training to be rolled out throughout the criminal justice system to recognise that stalking can take place across all relationship types. The research has been released ahead of National Stalking Awareness Week, which begins on Monday, and will this year focus on the impact stalking has on victims’ mental and emotional health. A Scottish government spokeswoman said: “While there is no simple solution to dealing with gender based violence, which includes stalking and harassment, we are committed to doing all we can to ensure victims are protected and can access the support they need. “We continue to work with Police Scotland, justice partners, the Scottish Women’s Rights Centre and key stakeholders to explore further measures to increase personal protection for victims.” View On Police Oracle
  3. Many officers felt forced to buy their own in order to look professional. The trousers have been described as 'substandard'. Picture: Scottish Police Federation Date - 28th March 2019 By - Hermione Wright Police Scotland confirmed today it will issue officers with a new style of trousers following a flurry of complaints the current uniform is of such poor quality that many have been forced to buy their own. Concerns were raised during the Scottish Police Federation conference this week, where members of the panel were asked if they are “embarrassed” by recruits turning up to a Tulliallan training site in home-bought slacks. The topic was then quickly picked up on Twitter, with many hitting out at the “substandard” and unprofessional-looking trousers that turn from black to grey in three washes. Another quipped they were great “as long as it didn’t rain”. One person even referred to the garment as “clown trousers”, and asked for the HMRC’s position regarding a tax rebate for uniform that officers have had no alternative but to buy for themselves. However, others took a different tact, believing recruits who turn up in their own clothing should be sent home as the police is not a “fashion show”. Responding to the complaints, Superintendent Tony Beveridge told Police Oracle that concerns about the quality of the trousers were raised last year. He said this was recognised as a fault by the manufacturers and has since been "rectified". He said: "It was also recognised there was a demand for cargo style trousers and significant work including forums and trials were carried out. "We will now issue a cargo style trouser to operational officers which will be issued in summer 2019." The Fed has been contacted for comment. View On Police Oracle
  4. olliem98

    Medical

    Morning all, Passed my AC earlier this week and I'm chuffed to bits. I have been given a date for my medical next month in Edinburgh and do have something to declare which I'm a bit worried about. I had an unexplained loss of consciousness with a short illness that followed and it was presumed encephalitis. This however was not diagnosed nor did I take any medication after. It's almost been 2 and a half years and I have had absolutely no issues relating to this. At the time I didn't have my driving licence but I did declare this with the DVLA and posed no issues in obtaining my driving licence. It's a massive grey area and is a genuine worry of mine. I have got this far and it would be a massive kick in the stomach for this to be a set back. Hope someone might be able to shed some light on this? Cheers Ollie
  5. emc2405

    Boots on the ground - footwear advice

    Hi All, I'm looking into getting my kit sorted for starting Tulliallan in June, and as a female can't decide whether I should invest in original men's boots or specialised female boots? I'm set on Altberg's, so I guess it's between the Peacekeeper P1 or the Ladies Sneeker/Warrior - can anyone shed some light on if the difference in females feet is significant enough to warrant getting boots specifically for ladies, cause I've heard nothing but good things about the Peacekeeper. Also, whats the opinion on waterproof boots versus standard "water repellent"? From what I've heard, the waterproof boots are hotter in summer, but is having dry feet worth dealing with this? Thanks
  6. DavieG87

    Police Scotland March Intake

    Hi Everyone, Currently going through the selection process and looking at a march intake. Has anyone else been comfirmed for this intake yet? the recruitment team have been doing around 40/50 interviews the last few mondays so guessing it’ll be a big intake and was thinking of putting together a group chat to help everyone prep etc.
  7. Pretty much the title. How long will the interview be? Will they ask a question for every competency? How many questions? And an idea of just how much job knowledge I need to memorise would be great too as I think I might be going overboard for this stage and am struggling to take everything in. Just to clarify where I'm at, I have passed the application and Standard Entrance Test and am due an interview the coming week.
  8. emanuel garcia

    Police Scotland Initial Interview

    Hi Guys, I am currently a special constable for Hertfordshire Police and I am living in London , I decided to apply for Police Scotland, passed S.E.T. and have my initial interview at the end of January - quite nervous as I am quite bad with interviews. Wanted to ask if anyone knows the questions I will or may be asked, and what should I study for the interview/expect. Any tips would be much appreciated. Want to feel more confident in passing. Many thanks
  9. Hi Guys, I am currently a special constable for Hertfordshire Police and I am living in London , I decided to apply for Police Scotland, passed S.E.T. and have my initial interview at the end of January - quite nervous as I am quite bad with interviews. Wanted to ask if anyone knows the questions I will or may be asked, and what should I study for the interview/expect. Any tips would be much appreciated. Want to feel more confident in passing. Many thanks
  10. THE top cop who claimed female firearms officers shouldn’t be on duty without a man has been unveiled. https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/scottish-news/3439671/police-scotland-firearms-female-email-row-sergeant-keith-warhurst/
  11. Police officers took almost 40,000 days off work last year due to stress-related illness. The Scottish Police Federation say some members have taken their own lives because of pressures they faced at work. https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scots-cops-anxious-suicidal-stress-13530271.amp ”Kennedy said: “One officer had a manager try to serve discipline forms on him the day after he tried to take his own life.” Did the manager know he’d tried to take his own life? If so what a ...... 😡
  12. Staff association says there are 'less risky, less complex and less costly' ways of devolving accountability. Date - 21st August 2018 By - Ian Weinfass - Police Oracle 4 Comments Opposition figures have called on the Scottish Government to revise its plans on merging British Transport Police into Police Scotland north of the border. Reports over the weekend, first appearing in The Scotsman, suggest ministers are re-thinking their plans to fully integrate the railways force into the national one. Scottish Labour, the Conservatives and BTP Federation have all since called for a re-think on the issue. The staff association wants the force to be retained in its current form but to be subject to increased accountability by the Scottish Government. Daniel Johnson, Labour’s justice spokesman, said: “Labour has consistently opposed this merger as it is unwanted, unnecessary and uncosted. “I hope reports are correct that [justice secretary] Humza Yousaf is finally listening to Labour, police officers and railway workers and looking for an alternative. “There is already one on the table brought forward by the British Transport Police Federation.” The Scottish Conservatives said on Facebook: “The SNP now needs to make clear exactly what it intends to do. “The merger plans are deeply unpopular, and opposed by officers, unions, train operators and passenger groups.” The BTP Federation said on the same site: “It would be absolutely the right decision to look at alternative options. There are other ways to achieve the principles of devolution which are less risky, less complex and less costly. “We would wholeheartedly welcome and support a re-think on this.” Timescales around the merger were extended due to complications in integrating IT systems and conditions of personnel. A spokesman for the Scottish Government said: “We have confirmed that our triple lock guarantee will protect jobs, pay and pensions for BTP officers transferring to Police Scotland. "There is a replanning exercise currently taking place. Once that is completed, we will ensure parliament is updated on our next steps. “We will never compromise the safety of the public." View On Police Oracle
  13. Detective sergeant says tackling domestic crime is one of force's main priorities. Court case: Edinburgh Sheriff Court Police Scotland says it will always conduct robust domestic crime investigations, after a man without a penis admitted inserting unknown implements into two women who thought they were having sex with him. Both had sex with 35-year-old Carlos Delacruz on multiple occasions but because he refused to let them see him naked – and he insisted on keeping the lights turned off – they didn’t realise he didn’t have genitalia, a court heard. One of his victims said that he would always hold the base of what she thought was his penis during sex while the other said that he made her bleed. Both only found out that he didn’t actually have a penis after their relationships broke down. Delacruz, from Banknock, near Falkirk, admitted to penetrating the women with an unknown object without their consent when he appeared at Edinburgh Sheriff Court on Tuesday. During an interview with Police Scotland officers, Delacruz made no comment. He was medically examined while in custody and found to have no penis. No details of Delacruz's gender position were read out in court. It was not revealed why he does not have a penis. Sheriff Alison Stirling placed Delacruz on the sex offenders’ register for a term still to be determined and deferred sentence to September. Detective Sergeant Mhairi Cooper from Police Scotland’s Public Protection Unit said: “Carlos Delacruz spent a long time deceiving the victims and his actions were a complete abuse of their trust. “Delacruz took advantage of the women and subjected them to sexual abuse over a period of time. “I would like to commend the bravery of the victims who contacted police and have been thoroughly cooperative throughout the course of our investigations. “Tackling domestic crime in all its forms remains one of our main priorities and we will always conduct robust investigations to ensure perpetrators are brought before the courts.” View On Police Oracle
  14. Issues raised by rank-and-file were whitewashed, documentary claims. Interim Chief Constable Iain Livingstone on the programme There are calls for Scotland’s Justice Secretary to answer questions over allegations that criticism of a force was removed from a report. A BBC documentary claimed a 2014 internal examination of issues in Police Scotland was watered down on the direction of former chief constable Sir Stephen House. Among the changes made were a section about a “culture of fear” in the force being edited to remove the word “fear” and re-named “culture and communication”. All criticism written in present tense was changed to past tense, the programme also claimed. Scottish Labour justice spokesman Daniel Johnson said: “These are very significant allegations that need to be taken seriously and addressed urgently. “The level of dysfunction in Police Scotland under Stephen House is well known, but allegations that rank and file officers had their concerns eradicated from reports to protect the top brass raise fundamental questions of integrity. “Officers and the public need urgent and transparent reassurance about how this was allowed to happen - and who knew what and when. It is therefore essential SNP Justice Minister Michael Matheson give a statement to Parliament on these reports as soon as possible.” Scottish Conservative Liam Kerr said: “This is yet another allegation of serious misconduct at Police Scotland. At the very least the Justice Secretary has to reassure the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish people that this situation has dramatically improved.” A Scottish Government spokesman said: “The Scottish Police Authority are seeking assurances from Police Scotland that matters raised were dealt with at the time. "Clearly any specific allegations of misconduct should be dealt with by the appropriate authorities.” On the programme, Interim Chief Constable Iain Livingstone said he is still weighing up whether to go for the post on a permanent basis. He was quizzed over misconduct he admitted in 2000 when, as a superintendent, he was accused of sexual assault of a female PC. He was cleared but admitted drinking too much and falling asleep “in the wrong place”. “I accepted that I had made a mistake. I accepted that I had learned from it and since that time I have continued to conduct my duties with absolute rigour and professionalism," he said. View On Police Oracle
  15. Dizzydee

    Lego policeman

    Long time since I've posted here, but wondering if anyone can help. I'm trying to get hold of a Lego mini figure with a likeness to a typical Police Scotland/UK police officer. I've tried looking online at the likes of eBay and other sites, but can only find cops done up like SWAT or with a custodian helmet or police of different countries. Anyone got any idea where I can get something more routine?
  16. My wife's parents are potentially retiring to Dumfries in the not too distant future and the idea of transferring north of the border has come up. It would help with child care and allow us to be near them as they get older. I'm not 100% convinced by the idea but I can see the merits in moving: there would be the added bonus that I could either be mortgage-free or upgrade to a much nicer house compared with what I have in the London-area. This is a very early fact-finding stage and I'm not set on the move - indeed, before this morning I didn't even realise a transfer was possible. I'm currently a PC in the Met with nearly 8 years service. I'm in a specialised (although not too specialised!) role. Up until a year ago I was a bog-standard uniformed neighbourhood cop, before that I was a response cop. So, my questions are: - Is there anyone on here who has made the change over? How did it go? How was learning a new legal system? Was there a big culture change? - What's the Dumfries/border area like? What's it like to live? What's it like to police? I was looking at Lockerbie as it seemed to have good transport links to both Edinburgh and Glasgow (thinking about potential jobs for the wife) but also back down South. Is there anyone you would definitely not want to live/work? - What is morale like? I would imagine it is better than most forces down south. What are promotion/job prospects like for specialist roles? I currently do a very interesting, albeit niche, role and fully accept that I will have to go back to being a response or neighbourhood cop - that doesn't bother me but if there are prospects of moving into other departments a few years down the line then I'd like to: part of me sees going back to response would be something of a "backward step". I have a friend who moved to a small English force and he said that everything was pretty much "dead man's shoes" and that you would need to expect to spend 30 years in uniform. One of the benefits of the Met is the absolutely huge range of jobs available. - On a rather more silly note, how would being an English Cop in Scotland go down? Both with colleagues and with the public. I can see myself getting plenty of ribbing.... but would there be downright hostility from the "customers"? (more so than usual). - Are there any particular areas that people would recommend to live/work? - Are there any other comments or pointers anyone would make? In terms of next steps I'm weighing up my options: Police Scotland are currently recruiting transferees and I'm seriously thinking of putting in an application. It seem like a long process so I would have plenty of time for fact finding and house hunting. In the meantime I'm thinking of making a little scoping trip up there to see what I think of the place.
  17. Laura1988

    Police Scotland March Intake

    Hi everyone, I’ve just received my final offer and will be heading to Tulliallan on 26th March 2018. Just wondering if there is anyone else on here doing so and if there are any specific forum groups on the go already that I can be directed to? Thanks, Laura
  18. Dazza981546621493

    Police Scotland Final Fitness

    Hey folks, Applied for Police Scotland in April 2017, passed the assessment centre/final interview on 16th November and passed my medical in December. Waiting for my vetting and references to come though, and I also need to go for my final fitness and SMT. May be a long shot but is there anyone who was also at that assessment day and is waiting to be called in again? Or any of you that may be able to give an educated guess on how much longer I can expect to be waiting? I imagine the delay would be due in part to the Christmas holidays. Cheers for the help!
  19. Complaint handling procedures at Scotland’s police oversight body are “neither effective nor efficient”, according to an audit report. https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/news/scotland/police-complaints-procedures-ineffective-and-inefficient/
  20. Serving and retired officers can claim held in reserve payments. Hundreds of officers who served in Scotland may be entitled to backdated bonus pay. Following a legal challenge Police Scotland must pay serving and retired officers so-called held in reserve payments stretching back to June 2012. It follows a row over the money owed to officers for the time they spent away from home but not on duty. A test case was won by the Scottish Police Federation earlier this year and the force is now paying out claims. Deputy General Secretary David Kennedy said: “It’s very much a success story, we don’t like litigating against the force but we are where we are. “It has taken a bit of time to work out the practicalities with Police Scotland on how to put the claims in but they are now coming in and the money will be paid as soon as possible. “Serving and retired officers are able to put claims in if they believe they’re owed money.” It is not known exactly how much it will cost Police Scotland, though it is likely to run into several million. A spokesman for the force said “appropriate budgetary provisions have been made”. He added: “We are aware of the decision. Our objective throughout was to secure best value for Police Scotland by ensuring that officers were paid correctly in terms of the Police Negotiating Board Circulars which were the subject of the Judicial Review. "When the judgement was issued we were pleased to note Lady Wise [who ruled on the dispute] stated no criticism could be levelled for taking our statutory duties to secure best value consciously and seriously. "Since then, we have been working with the Scottish Police Federation to establish a procedure for the submission and consideration of officers' claims." Full Story - Police Oracle
  21. Allekoren

    Overtime?

    HI all, I'm currently going through the application process at the moment but I was wondering what sort of opportunity there is for overtime during probation and whether it comes with extra pay at all (and if it does, how does that work)?.
  22. MSPs have passed legislation aimed at merging railway policing north of the border into Police Scotland. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill is the first step towards the national force taking on the role of British Transport Police (BTP). There had been a lengthy debate over the plan, with police bosses warning it could be "massively complicated" and "a real challenge". The bill passed by 68 votes to 53, with the Greens backing the SNP. Labour and the Conservatives have opposed the merger and the bill throughout, and the Lib Dems - who had supported the legislation in the stage one vote in order to pursue amendments at committee stage - also voted against the bill. Look back on the stage three debate and vote on Holyrood Live The Scottish government has long wanted to integrate railway policing services into the single national force, and tabled a bill to that end in December 2016. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill confers extra powers on the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, but further legislation would be needed at Holyrood and Westminster to transfer staff, properties and cross-border policing functions. The Scottish government insists the integration will provide "efficient and effective" delivery of policing. However, there has been debate over the plan, with concerns ranging from how cross-border services would be affected to the potential dilution of the special skills of transport officers. The BTP wanted to continue providing railway policing in Scotland, but with oversight from Holyrood rather than Westminster. Chief Constable Paul Crowther warned MSPs that a merger could present a "real challenge" in replacing officers amid a "significant outflow of expertise". However, Police Scotland's Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins told the justice committee the move was not a "land-grab" by his force, saying the transition would be "complicated, but not insurmountable". 'Absolutely committed' After a series of votes on amendments during the stage three debate, Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said the "primary objective" of the move was to "maintain and enhance high standards of safety". He said the bill would improve accountability of railway policing in Scotland, and said he remained "absolutely committed" to backing staff. The Scottish Conservatives opposed the plans, with MSP Oliver Mundell describing the merger as "an ill-judged and ill-thought out idea". He added: "The list of those with concerns is almost as long as the Scottish government's list of excuses on policing matters." Image copyrightBRITISH TRANSPORT POLICE MSPs have passed legislation aimed at merging railway policing north of the border into Police Scotland. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill is the first step towards the national force taking on the role of British Transport Police (BTP). There had been a lengthy debate over the plan, with police bosses warning it could be "massively complicated" and "a real challenge". The bill passed by 68 votes to 53, with the Greens backing the SNP. Labour and the Conservatives have opposed the merger and the bill throughout, and the Lib Dems - who had supported the legislation in the stage one vote in order to pursue amendments at committee stage - also voted against the bill. Look back on the stage three debate and vote on Holyrood Live The Scottish government has long wanted to integrate railway policing services into the single national force, and tabled a bill to that end in December 2016. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill confers extra powers on the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, but further legislation would be needed at Holyrood and Westminster to transfer staff, properties and cross-border policing functions. The Scottish government insists the integration will provide "efficient and effective" delivery of policing. However, there has been debate over the plan, with concerns ranging from how cross-border services would be affected to the potential dilution of the special skills of transport officers. Image captionTransport Minister Humza Yousaf said the government had "listened closely" to concerns about the plans The BTP wanted to continue providing railway policing in Scotland, but with oversight from Holyrood rather than Westminster. Chief Constable Paul Crowther warned MSPs that a merger could present a "real challenge" in replacing officers amid a "significant outflow of expertise". However, Police Scotland's Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins told the justice committee the move was not a "land-grab" by his force, saying the transition would be "complicated, but not insurmountable". 'Absolutely committed' After a series of votes on amendments during the stage three debate, Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said the "primary objective" of the move was to "maintain and enhance high standards of safety". He said the bill would improve accountability of railway policing in Scotland, and said he remained "absolutely committed" to backing staff. The Scottish Conservatives opposed the plans, with MSP Oliver Mundell describing the merger as "an ill-judged and ill-thought out idea". He added: "The list of those with concerns is almost as long as the Scottish government's list of excuses on policing matters." Image captionThe bill was passed by 68 votes to 53 Labour's Claire Baker also spoke out against the plan, warning of a loss of expertise and saying: "The Scottish government have ignored concerns of staff and unions". Her colleague Neil Bibby, who moved a series of amendments to the bill, said it was "shocking" that the government was "ignoring the views of our police officers". Lib Dem MSP Mike Russell said the merger was the riskiest of three options put forward, saying that ministers had decided that the majority of those in the policing sector who opposed the move were wrong. However, Green member John Finnie said his party would support the bill on the condition there was no detriment to staff. Commenting after the bill was approved, Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said: "With this move we are ensuring that policing on Scotland's 93 million annual rail journeys is fully accountable to the people of Scotland and our parliament. "Making this change gives our railway officers access to the specialist resources of the UK's second largest police force including, crucially, counter-terrorism capabilities." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-40404532
  23. Just thought I would update people and ask a question. So I sent off my application for police scotland specials on 22nd of august, I received a e-mail today to say that I had been invited to attend an initial fitness test up in Jackton on the 3rd november at 9 am lol. I was hoping if someone who has done it up in Jackton could tell me what to expect? They also request that I bring photo id is there like lockers there, since I dont really want to be jogging/running with my drivers licence in my pocket in case it comes out. Thanks
  24. sierragolf95

    Police Custody & Security Officer

    Hi folks, have just applied for the above position, while I know it is similar to a detention officer type role in England, could anyone give me a bit more information about it? I'm currently event security and nightclub door staff looking to explore new opportunities.
  25. RANK-and-file cops have hit out amid threats they’ll be fired unless they declare any contacts to journalists and politicians. Full Story - ScottishSun

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