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Found 49 results

  1. DavieG87

    Police Scotland March Intake

    Hi Everyone, Currently going through the selection process and looking at a march intake. Has anyone else been comfirmed for this intake yet? the recruitment team have been doing around 40/50 interviews the last few mondays so guessing it’ll be a big intake and was thinking of putting together a group chat to help everyone prep etc.
  2. Pretty much the title. How long will the interview be? Will they ask a question for every competency? How many questions? And an idea of just how much job knowledge I need to memorise would be great too as I think I might be going overboard for this stage and am struggling to take everything in. Just to clarify where I'm at, I have passed the application and Standard Entrance Test and am due an interview the coming week.
  3. Children's minister urges caution with extra 'primary legislation' needed first. Bottom of the league: Scotland's current age of criminality is eight Date - 31st January 2019 By - Nick Hudson - Police Oracle Attempts to double the age of criminality in Scotland to 16 have been blocked by MSPs. Liberal Democrat Alex Cole-Hamilton proposed amendments to a planned new law to increase the age from eight to 12, arguing an additional increase would be “in line with international responsibilities”. The current age is one of the lowest in the world, and below the rest of the UK at 10. The age 12 recommendation was first mooted in 2015 but is only now being put before the Scottish parliament. During a debate on the Age of Criminal Responsibility (Scotland) Bill at stage two at Holyrood’s Equalities and Human Rights Committee, Mr Cole-Hamilton said the United Nations will increase the baseline age from the current 12 to 14 in the coming days. He said: “Unamended, this Bill is an embarrassment… I will only vote for this Bill because the current age of criminal responsibility in Scotland is, quite frankly, medieval.” He said history, the international community and the children affected will judge the government for not backing the further increase, which he said wrecks any claim that Scotland is a human rights champion. His amendments to raise the age of criminal responsibility to either 14 or 16, to give 18 months for this to come into effect once the legislation raising the age to 12 is passed, or to increase the age of criminal prosecution to either 14 or 16, were all voted down by five votes to two. Mr Cole-Hamilton was backed by Labour’s Mary Fee in voting for the change, while SNP and Conservative committee members voted against it. The Tories’ own amendment to give Scotland’s top prosecutor, the Lord Advocate, discretion to become involved in “exceptional cases” of children below 12 was also defeated by five votes to two. The Lib Dem MSP said last year, 11 cases of offences being committed by 12 and 13-year-olds were taken to court. He argued this shot down the government’s case that a further increase from the age of 12 would cause a capacity issue. He criticised the SNP for an argument he claimed suggests the children’s hearing system exempts Scotland from international standards, saying: “When it comes to the international minimum, we don’t get a pass.” Minister for Children and Young People Maree Todd urged the committee not to back the amendments for a further age rise. She said she had “significant concerns” about using the Bill to raise the age past 12, highlighting worries about the readiness to deal with further increases, which she said would require additional primary legislation. She also raised capacity concerns, adding: “I think that by setting arbitrary time limits there is a risk we rush this and fail to address all the matters that need to be considered. We need to take the time to get it right.” An advisory group set up by the Scottish Government in 2015 recommended that the age of criminal responsibility be raised to 12. Last year, ministers held a consultation on the age change between March and June, but did not take a firm position on the proposal. A report was published in November and the following month Early Years Minister Mark McDonald confirmed the case for change was "clear and compelling", with the consultation revealing "overwhelming support" for the move from police, victim support organisations and charities that help vulnerable children. He said: "I acknowledge that some will be concerned at the change and its impact. What should reassure them is that children and young people want this, victims' groups want it, police and prosecutors want it, and the United Nations has called on us to do it. "This reform signals our commitment to a smart, evidence-led and rights-proofed approach.” Referencing the death of toddler James Bulger, murdered by two 10-year-old boys in Merseyside in 1993, Mr McDonald emphasised that while there has been no similar Scottish case, "sensible and proportionate" safeguards would be put in place to deal with the possibility of serious cases. View On Police Oracle
  4. Hi Everyone, Anyone else have a start date of Feb 11th that fancies starting up a group chat to get to know each other or if there already is one going that I could be added to? I'm sure everyone is starting to get organised so it would be good to share preperation, tips etc
  5. Hey everyone, i received my letter for the 18th February and wondered who else will be going to that intake? I have seen mentions of a group chat but not sure if there is one or not but if anyone wants if you message me i do not mind starting one just to see how everyone is getting ready and preparing to start 😊
  6. emanuel garcia

    Police Scotland Initial Interview

    Hi Guys, I am currently a special constable for Hertfordshire Police and I am living in London , I decided to apply for Police Scotland, passed S.E.T. and have my initial interview at the end of January - quite nervous as I am quite bad with interviews. Wanted to ask if anyone knows the questions I will or may be asked, and what should I study for the interview/expect. Any tips would be much appreciated. Want to feel more confident in passing. Many thanks
  7. Hi Guys, I am currently a special constable for Hertfordshire Police and I am living in London , I decided to apply for Police Scotland, passed S.E.T. and have my initial interview at the end of January - quite nervous as I am quite bad with interviews. Wanted to ask if anyone knows the questions I will or may be asked, and what should I study for the interview/expect. Any tips would be much appreciated. Want to feel more confident in passing. Many thanks
  8. THE top cop who claimed female firearms officers shouldn’t be on duty without a man has been unveiled. https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/scottish-news/3439671/police-scotland-firearms-female-email-row-sergeant-keith-warhurst/
  9. Police officers took almost 40,000 days off work last year due to stress-related illness. The Scottish Police Federation say some members have taken their own lives because of pressures they faced at work. https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scots-cops-anxious-suicidal-stress-13530271.amp ”Kennedy said: “One officer had a manager try to serve discipline forms on him the day after he tried to take his own life.” Did the manager know he’d tried to take his own life? If so what a ...... 😡
  10. Staff association says there are 'less risky, less complex and less costly' ways of devolving accountability. Date - 21st August 2018 By - Ian Weinfass - Police Oracle 4 Comments Opposition figures have called on the Scottish Government to revise its plans on merging British Transport Police into Police Scotland north of the border. Reports over the weekend, first appearing in The Scotsman, suggest ministers are re-thinking their plans to fully integrate the railways force into the national one. Scottish Labour, the Conservatives and BTP Federation have all since called for a re-think on the issue. The staff association wants the force to be retained in its current form but to be subject to increased accountability by the Scottish Government. Daniel Johnson, Labour’s justice spokesman, said: “Labour has consistently opposed this merger as it is unwanted, unnecessary and uncosted. “I hope reports are correct that [justice secretary] Humza Yousaf is finally listening to Labour, police officers and railway workers and looking for an alternative. “There is already one on the table brought forward by the British Transport Police Federation.” The Scottish Conservatives said on Facebook: “The SNP now needs to make clear exactly what it intends to do. “The merger plans are deeply unpopular, and opposed by officers, unions, train operators and passenger groups.” The BTP Federation said on the same site: “It would be absolutely the right decision to look at alternative options. There are other ways to achieve the principles of devolution which are less risky, less complex and less costly. “We would wholeheartedly welcome and support a re-think on this.” Timescales around the merger were extended due to complications in integrating IT systems and conditions of personnel. A spokesman for the Scottish Government said: “We have confirmed that our triple lock guarantee will protect jobs, pay and pensions for BTP officers transferring to Police Scotland. "There is a replanning exercise currently taking place. Once that is completed, we will ensure parliament is updated on our next steps. “We will never compromise the safety of the public." View On Police Oracle
  11. Detective sergeant says tackling domestic crime is one of force's main priorities. Court case: Edinburgh Sheriff Court Police Scotland says it will always conduct robust domestic crime investigations, after a man without a penis admitted inserting unknown implements into two women who thought they were having sex with him. Both had sex with 35-year-old Carlos Delacruz on multiple occasions but because he refused to let them see him naked – and he insisted on keeping the lights turned off – they didn’t realise he didn’t have genitalia, a court heard. One of his victims said that he would always hold the base of what she thought was his penis during sex while the other said that he made her bleed. Both only found out that he didn’t actually have a penis after their relationships broke down. Delacruz, from Banknock, near Falkirk, admitted to penetrating the women with an unknown object without their consent when he appeared at Edinburgh Sheriff Court on Tuesday. During an interview with Police Scotland officers, Delacruz made no comment. He was medically examined while in custody and found to have no penis. No details of Delacruz's gender position were read out in court. It was not revealed why he does not have a penis. Sheriff Alison Stirling placed Delacruz on the sex offenders’ register for a term still to be determined and deferred sentence to September. Detective Sergeant Mhairi Cooper from Police Scotland’s Public Protection Unit said: “Carlos Delacruz spent a long time deceiving the victims and his actions were a complete abuse of their trust. “Delacruz took advantage of the women and subjected them to sexual abuse over a period of time. “I would like to commend the bravery of the victims who contacted police and have been thoroughly cooperative throughout the course of our investigations. “Tackling domestic crime in all its forms remains one of our main priorities and we will always conduct robust investigations to ensure perpetrators are brought before the courts.” View On Police Oracle
  12. Issues raised by rank-and-file were whitewashed, documentary claims. Interim Chief Constable Iain Livingstone on the programme There are calls for Scotland’s Justice Secretary to answer questions over allegations that criticism of a force was removed from a report. A BBC documentary claimed a 2014 internal examination of issues in Police Scotland was watered down on the direction of former chief constable Sir Stephen House. Among the changes made were a section about a “culture of fear” in the force being edited to remove the word “fear” and re-named “culture and communication”. All criticism written in present tense was changed to past tense, the programme also claimed. Scottish Labour justice spokesman Daniel Johnson said: “These are very significant allegations that need to be taken seriously and addressed urgently. “The level of dysfunction in Police Scotland under Stephen House is well known, but allegations that rank and file officers had their concerns eradicated from reports to protect the top brass raise fundamental questions of integrity. “Officers and the public need urgent and transparent reassurance about how this was allowed to happen - and who knew what and when. It is therefore essential SNP Justice Minister Michael Matheson give a statement to Parliament on these reports as soon as possible.” Scottish Conservative Liam Kerr said: “This is yet another allegation of serious misconduct at Police Scotland. At the very least the Justice Secretary has to reassure the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish people that this situation has dramatically improved.” A Scottish Government spokesman said: “The Scottish Police Authority are seeking assurances from Police Scotland that matters raised were dealt with at the time. "Clearly any specific allegations of misconduct should be dealt with by the appropriate authorities.” On the programme, Interim Chief Constable Iain Livingstone said he is still weighing up whether to go for the post on a permanent basis. He was quizzed over misconduct he admitted in 2000 when, as a superintendent, he was accused of sexual assault of a female PC. He was cleared but admitted drinking too much and falling asleep “in the wrong place”. “I accepted that I had made a mistake. I accepted that I had learned from it and since that time I have continued to conduct my duties with absolute rigour and professionalism," he said. View On Police Oracle
  13. Dizzydee

    Lego policeman

    Long time since I've posted here, but wondering if anyone can help. I'm trying to get hold of a Lego mini figure with a likeness to a typical Police Scotland/UK police officer. I've tried looking online at the likes of eBay and other sites, but can only find cops done up like SWAT or with a custodian helmet or police of different countries. Anyone got any idea where I can get something more routine?
  14. My wife's parents are potentially retiring to Dumfries in the not too distant future and the idea of transferring north of the border has come up. It would help with child care and allow us to be near them as they get older. I'm not 100% convinced by the idea but I can see the merits in moving: there would be the added bonus that I could either be mortgage-free or upgrade to a much nicer house compared with what I have in the London-area. This is a very early fact-finding stage and I'm not set on the move - indeed, before this morning I didn't even realise a transfer was possible. I'm currently a PC in the Met with nearly 8 years service. I'm in a specialised (although not too specialised!) role. Up until a year ago I was a bog-standard uniformed neighbourhood cop, before that I was a response cop. So, my questions are: - Is there anyone on here who has made the change over? How did it go? How was learning a new legal system? Was there a big culture change? - What's the Dumfries/border area like? What's it like to live? What's it like to police? I was looking at Lockerbie as it seemed to have good transport links to both Edinburgh and Glasgow (thinking about potential jobs for the wife) but also back down South. Is there anyone you would definitely not want to live/work? - What is morale like? I would imagine it is better than most forces down south. What are promotion/job prospects like for specialist roles? I currently do a very interesting, albeit niche, role and fully accept that I will have to go back to being a response or neighbourhood cop - that doesn't bother me but if there are prospects of moving into other departments a few years down the line then I'd like to: part of me sees going back to response would be something of a "backward step". I have a friend who moved to a small English force and he said that everything was pretty much "dead man's shoes" and that you would need to expect to spend 30 years in uniform. One of the benefits of the Met is the absolutely huge range of jobs available. - On a rather more silly note, how would being an English Cop in Scotland go down? Both with colleagues and with the public. I can see myself getting plenty of ribbing.... but would there be downright hostility from the "customers"? (more so than usual). - Are there any particular areas that people would recommend to live/work? - Are there any other comments or pointers anyone would make? In terms of next steps I'm weighing up my options: Police Scotland are currently recruiting transferees and I'm seriously thinking of putting in an application. It seem like a long process so I would have plenty of time for fact finding and house hunting. In the meantime I'm thinking of making a little scoping trip up there to see what I think of the place.
  15. Laura1988

    Police Scotland March Intake

    Hi everyone, I’ve just received my final offer and will be heading to Tulliallan on 26th March 2018. Just wondering if there is anyone else on here doing so and if there are any specific forum groups on the go already that I can be directed to? Thanks, Laura
  16. Dazza981546621493

    Police Scotland Final Fitness

    Hey folks, Applied for Police Scotland in April 2017, passed the assessment centre/final interview on 16th November and passed my medical in December. Waiting for my vetting and references to come though, and I also need to go for my final fitness and SMT. May be a long shot but is there anyone who was also at that assessment day and is waiting to be called in again? Or any of you that may be able to give an educated guess on how much longer I can expect to be waiting? I imagine the delay would be due in part to the Christmas holidays. Cheers for the help!
  17. Complaint handling procedures at Scotland’s police oversight body are “neither effective nor efficient”, according to an audit report. https://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/news/scotland/police-complaints-procedures-ineffective-and-inefficient/
  18. Serving and retired officers can claim held in reserve payments. Hundreds of officers who served in Scotland may be entitled to backdated bonus pay. Following a legal challenge Police Scotland must pay serving and retired officers so-called held in reserve payments stretching back to June 2012. It follows a row over the money owed to officers for the time they spent away from home but not on duty. A test case was won by the Scottish Police Federation earlier this year and the force is now paying out claims. Deputy General Secretary David Kennedy said: “It’s very much a success story, we don’t like litigating against the force but we are where we are. “It has taken a bit of time to work out the practicalities with Police Scotland on how to put the claims in but they are now coming in and the money will be paid as soon as possible. “Serving and retired officers are able to put claims in if they believe they’re owed money.” It is not known exactly how much it will cost Police Scotland, though it is likely to run into several million. A spokesman for the force said “appropriate budgetary provisions have been made”. He added: “We are aware of the decision. Our objective throughout was to secure best value for Police Scotland by ensuring that officers were paid correctly in terms of the Police Negotiating Board Circulars which were the subject of the Judicial Review. "When the judgement was issued we were pleased to note Lady Wise [who ruled on the dispute] stated no criticism could be levelled for taking our statutory duties to secure best value consciously and seriously. "Since then, we have been working with the Scottish Police Federation to establish a procedure for the submission and consideration of officers' claims." Full Story - Police Oracle
  19. Allekoren

    Overtime?

    HI all, I'm currently going through the application process at the moment but I was wondering what sort of opportunity there is for overtime during probation and whether it comes with extra pay at all (and if it does, how does that work)?.
  20. MSPs have passed legislation aimed at merging railway policing north of the border into Police Scotland. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill is the first step towards the national force taking on the role of British Transport Police (BTP). There had been a lengthy debate over the plan, with police bosses warning it could be "massively complicated" and "a real challenge". The bill passed by 68 votes to 53, with the Greens backing the SNP. Labour and the Conservatives have opposed the merger and the bill throughout, and the Lib Dems - who had supported the legislation in the stage one vote in order to pursue amendments at committee stage - also voted against the bill. Look back on the stage three debate and vote on Holyrood Live The Scottish government has long wanted to integrate railway policing services into the single national force, and tabled a bill to that end in December 2016. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill confers extra powers on the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, but further legislation would be needed at Holyrood and Westminster to transfer staff, properties and cross-border policing functions. The Scottish government insists the integration will provide "efficient and effective" delivery of policing. However, there has been debate over the plan, with concerns ranging from how cross-border services would be affected to the potential dilution of the special skills of transport officers. The BTP wanted to continue providing railway policing in Scotland, but with oversight from Holyrood rather than Westminster. Chief Constable Paul Crowther warned MSPs that a merger could present a "real challenge" in replacing officers amid a "significant outflow of expertise". However, Police Scotland's Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins told the justice committee the move was not a "land-grab" by his force, saying the transition would be "complicated, but not insurmountable". 'Absolutely committed' After a series of votes on amendments during the stage three debate, Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said the "primary objective" of the move was to "maintain and enhance high standards of safety". He said the bill would improve accountability of railway policing in Scotland, and said he remained "absolutely committed" to backing staff. The Scottish Conservatives opposed the plans, with MSP Oliver Mundell describing the merger as "an ill-judged and ill-thought out idea". He added: "The list of those with concerns is almost as long as the Scottish government's list of excuses on policing matters." Image copyrightBRITISH TRANSPORT POLICE MSPs have passed legislation aimed at merging railway policing north of the border into Police Scotland. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill is the first step towards the national force taking on the role of British Transport Police (BTP). There had been a lengthy debate over the plan, with police bosses warning it could be "massively complicated" and "a real challenge". The bill passed by 68 votes to 53, with the Greens backing the SNP. Labour and the Conservatives have opposed the merger and the bill throughout, and the Lib Dems - who had supported the legislation in the stage one vote in order to pursue amendments at committee stage - also voted against the bill. Look back on the stage three debate and vote on Holyrood Live The Scottish government has long wanted to integrate railway policing services into the single national force, and tabled a bill to that end in December 2016. The Railway Policing (Scotland) Bill confers extra powers on the Scottish Police Authority and the Police Service of Scotland, but further legislation would be needed at Holyrood and Westminster to transfer staff, properties and cross-border policing functions. The Scottish government insists the integration will provide "efficient and effective" delivery of policing. However, there has been debate over the plan, with concerns ranging from how cross-border services would be affected to the potential dilution of the special skills of transport officers. Image captionTransport Minister Humza Yousaf said the government had "listened closely" to concerns about the plans The BTP wanted to continue providing railway policing in Scotland, but with oversight from Holyrood rather than Westminster. Chief Constable Paul Crowther warned MSPs that a merger could present a "real challenge" in replacing officers amid a "significant outflow of expertise". However, Police Scotland's Assistant Chief Constable Bernard Higgins told the justice committee the move was not a "land-grab" by his force, saying the transition would be "complicated, but not insurmountable". 'Absolutely committed' After a series of votes on amendments during the stage three debate, Transport Minister Humza Yousaf said the "primary objective" of the move was to "maintain and enhance high standards of safety". He said the bill would improve accountability of railway policing in Scotland, and said he remained "absolutely committed" to backing staff. The Scottish Conservatives opposed the plans, with MSP Oliver Mundell describing the merger as "an ill-judged and ill-thought out idea". He added: "The list of those with concerns is almost as long as the Scottish government's list of excuses on policing matters." Image captionThe bill was passed by 68 votes to 53 Labour's Claire Baker also spoke out against the plan, warning of a loss of expertise and saying: "The Scottish government have ignored concerns of staff and unions". Her colleague Neil Bibby, who moved a series of amendments to the bill, said it was "shocking" that the government was "ignoring the views of our police officers". Lib Dem MSP Mike Russell said the merger was the riskiest of three options put forward, saying that ministers had decided that the majority of those in the policing sector who opposed the move were wrong. However, Green member John Finnie said his party would support the bill on the condition there was no detriment to staff. Commenting after the bill was approved, Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said: "With this move we are ensuring that policing on Scotland's 93 million annual rail journeys is fully accountable to the people of Scotland and our parliament. "Making this change gives our railway officers access to the specialist resources of the UK's second largest police force including, crucially, counter-terrorism capabilities." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-politics-40404532
  21. Just thought I would update people and ask a question. So I sent off my application for police scotland specials on 22nd of august, I received a e-mail today to say that I had been invited to attend an initial fitness test up in Jackton on the 3rd november at 9 am lol. I was hoping if someone who has done it up in Jackton could tell me what to expect? They also request that I bring photo id is there like lockers there, since I dont really want to be jogging/running with my drivers licence in my pocket in case it comes out. Thanks
  22. sierragolf95

    Police Custody & Security Officer

    Hi folks, have just applied for the above position, while I know it is similar to a detention officer type role in England, could anyone give me a bit more information about it? I'm currently event security and nightclub door staff looking to explore new opportunities.
  23. RANK-and-file cops have hit out amid threats they’ll be fired unless they declare any contacts to journalists and politicians. Full Story - ScottishSun
  24. Police Scotland has outlined plans to cut officer numbers by 400 as part of its 10-year policing plan. Chief Constable Phil Gormley said recruitment levels would remain unchanged in the current year, but would begin to slow between 2018-20. He said resources would be re-directed to frontline operations, amid big financial challenges. Last December, the spending watchdog said Scotland's police service was facing a £188m funding gap by 2020-21. Mr Gormley said officer numbers had been at historic highs but said some staff had been used for corporate, rather than community roles. As part of a new strategy, Policing 2026, he said police officers would be released from corporate and backroom roles, with priority given to frontline operations and a more visible community presence. Some corporate roles will also be cut. Mr Gormley said that changing technology meant that not everyone involved in fighting crime would be a serving police officer. And he added that the workforce would be given new training to fight cybercrime. Fighting cybercrime Andrew Flanagan, chairman of the Scottish Police Authority, said action must be taken but said police officer recruitment would only be cut if approved by the SPA. He told a press conference at the launch of the new strategy: "We are anticipating a small reduction in police officer numbers through to 2020. "It would be around 400, but that would come towards the end of the period, rather than early on. "We expect police officer numbers to remain at their current level through the coming year and only gradually reduce thereafter." He added: "I must stress - we will not reduce police officer numbers until we see these productivity gains coming through. "So, actually, we are anticipating the amount of operational policing will actually increase through the period through to 2020." As part of the new strategy, people across Scotland are being invited to give their views on how Police Scotland should be shaped over the next 10 years in a 10-week consultation. Police Scotland has pointed out that patterns of crime are changing - often enabled by new technologies. The population profile is also ageing and becoming more diverse and the duty to protect the vulnerable is becoming ever more complex. It said the police service must adapt and develop its capacity and capability to maximise public safety and remain operationally and financially sustainable. Add most value The force said the new strategy would create a workforce of police officers and staff who are focused on where they can add most value to protecting and serving the public. It suggested that technology and new ways of working would lead to greater productivity and more time tackling crime and addressing issues around vulnerability. The workforce mix would also evolve as new skills and capabilities were developed. The strategy would recognise that police are dealing increasingly with vulnerable people who need medical or social care rather than law enforcement officers. Key areas in the new strategy: Prevention - tackling crime, inequality and critical problems facing communities Protection - based on threat, risk and harm Communities - focused on localism, diversity and the virtual world Knowledge - informing the development of better services Innovation - becoming a dynamic, adaptable and sustainable service Mr Flanagan and Mr Gormley announced the consultation in Edinburgh. Mr Flanagan said: "The SPA and Police Scotland have spent many months assessing the changing nature of communities and their demands on policing as well as analysing the changing nature of crime. "From a position of strength, we need to ensure that Police Scotland adapts to these changes and has the range of skills and capacity to deal with growing demand and that we do so in a financially-sustainable way." 'Must transform' He added: "Policing is a vital public service and it is essential that we listen to those we wish to serve to ensure we meet their expectations. "Through this consultation we are asking for everyone to provide their views on the approach outlined today and I would urge as many people as possible to take part." Mr Gormley said: "Policing in Scotland has gone through significant transition; it is proudly one of the oldest public services in the world. "Now the service must transform to realise and release the full benefits of being a single organisation. "Local policing will remain at the heart of what we do, supported by a wide range of specialist capabilities. "In an ever-changing world, people will continue to turn to the police service for a myriad of reasons, which means it's never been more important to understand our demand, both current and future, in order to be able deliver a service which is relevant, has legitimacy and above all maintains the trust and confidence of the public." Officers on the beat Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said Police Scotland must "embrace new approaches" and said the Scottish government had provided an enhanced £61m reform budget for 2017-18 to support the changes. "While our Programme for Government is clear about the need to consider the right mix of skills and not just overall numbers, the public will always be interested in the number of police officers on the beat," he said. "We will pay particular attention to these issues before approval of the final strategy. In all circumstances, I would expect to see the number of police officers remaining significantly above the number we inherited in 2007. "Indeed, our enhanced funding gives police the platform to invest in the wider workforce, technology and other resources to keep communities safe." He added: " I urge all those with an interest to have their say on this next phase of policing in Scotland." Anyone who wants to contribute to the consultation should submit their comments by 8 May. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-39097972
  25. Fadsz

    Vetting appeal

    Hello Just wondering if there's anyone else out there in a similar position to myself. I've recently been successful throughout the whole recruitment process until the final stages of my vetting. They said due to "3rd party associations". I am so disheartened and I am going to appeal. Just querying if there was anyone else with a similar situation or (hopefully!) some success stories with appealling? It's so frustrating to get to the end and be told this.

About us

Police Community was originally founded in 2014 by two serving Police Officers.

In 2016 it was incorporated as a limited company called RAW Digital Media Limited and then purchased 3 other forums; Police Specials, UK Police Online and Police UK to form the largest policing discussion forum network in the UK.

Get in touch

  • 20-22 Wenlock Road, London N1 7GU
  • contact@rawdigitalmedia.co.uk
  • 0844 357 0111
  • Forums In Our Group - Police.Community - UKPoliceOnline.CO.UK - PoliceSpecials.COM - PoliceUK.COM

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    Meet The Team

  • Chief Bakes
    Chief Bakes Management
  • Chief Rat
    Chief Rat Management
  • Chief Cheetah
    Chief Cheetah Management
  • Rocket
    Rocket Global Moderators
  • David
    David Global Moderators
  • Fedster
    Fedster Global Moderators
  • Devil
    Devil Global Moderators
  • MindTheGap
    MindTheGap Global Moderators
  • blakey
    blakey Global Moderators
  • Techie1
    Techie1 Global Moderators
  • Sir Penguin
    Sir Penguin Global Moderators
  • PCW
    PCW Global Moderators
  • Hoofing
    Hoofing Global Moderators
  • XA84
    XA84 Global Moderators
  • Remmy
    Remmy Global Moderators
  • job_done
    job_done Global Moderators
  • Sapor62
    Sapor62 Global Moderators
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