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Found 85 results

  1. Before the MPS, murderers, thieves and rioters ran amok with citizens taking the law into their own hands. Victorian police uniform complete with high-necked collars for protection again stranglers. (Twitter - @KentOfInglewood) London was a grim place in the 1800s, with poverty prevailing in the backstreet slums of the big smoke it Is not surprising that many turned to petty thieving in order to live. Children used to pick a pocket or two while women engaged in a spot of shoplifting from time to time. But there was a more sinister side to petty thieves, with notorious conmen called ‘sharpers’ who would go to extreme measures by dipping a hanky in chloroform to subdue their victim before robbing them. Sometimes a man's hat might be tipped over his face to facilitate the crime - a trick called bonneting. Another ruse was to lure men down to the riverside using prostitutes as decoys. The dupes would then be beaten up and robbed out of sight of passers-by. Murders were also on the rise along with riots where mobs of unhappy Victorians would gather at Hyde Park and Trafalgar Square to air their grievances. Although there were foot patrols - whose main role it was to protect property - there was no overall organised policing unit. Many prosecutions were not carried out by police and were taken into the hands of the victims. The victim would have to apprehend the criminal themselves or employ a ‘thief-taker’ to drag them by the ears to the parish constable or magistrate. Sir Robert Peel, who was Home Secretary in 1829, decided things were getting a little out of hand so persuaded Parliament to provide a new police force for London, excluding the City and the Thames, who already had their own uniformed patrols. He tasked a committee to investigate the current system of policing. Peel immediately acted upon the committee’s findings and created ‘Peelian principles’ that involved the payment of police officers who were organised along civilian lines. Peel’s ideas for the system of policing were approved by Parliament in the Metropolitan Police Act with Royal Assent being granted on June 19 1829. The 895 constables of the new force, nicknamed ‘Peelers’ or ‘Bobbies’ after their founder, were responsible for law enforcement and public order within a seven-mile radius of Charing Cross. (Twitter - @MarshallGroup) They were overseen by a progressing hierarchy of Sergeants, Inspectors, Superintendents and two Commissioners who reported directly to Peel himself. On September 29 1829 – 188 years ago – the Metropolitan Police Force was officially formed. It would have eight Superintendents paid £200 a year, 20 inspectors paid £100 a year, 88 sergeants paid 3s 6d a day and constables paid 3s a day. There were considerable problems with those recruited, many were drunks, unfit and unruly and in the first six months just over 50 per cent were required to leave the service. Each officer was issued with a warrant number and a divisional letter which denoted where they worked. The first headquarters was 4 Whitehall Place, with a back entrance for special visitors via Scotland Yard. The bobbies were given blue uniforms to distinguish them from the red used by the military and sent out on the beat with only a wooden truncheon and a ratcheted rattle to raise the alarm. (Twitter - @Chindiazindabad) High-necked tunics protected officers from strangulation – it was popular back then to garrotte people from behind - and top hats were reinforced as Peelers were likely to be attacked in the street - and penalties for violent crime were more lenient. After PC Robert Culley was stabbed to death at a riot in Holborn in 1833 a coroner's jury returned a verdict of "justifiable homicide". At first the public did not embrace the new force, it was paid for from local parish monies and some members of the public argued the Met was a threat to civil liberties. Some members however remained hostile, numerous reports say the first traffic police risked being run down and horse-whipped by irate coachmen. Eventually they warmed to the idea of a police force and officers became better skilled at the difficult job they had to do. “The police are the public and the public are the police; the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence.” – Sir Robert Peel. View on Police Oracle
  2. The Met currently has two trial BCUs (Basic Command Units) at the moment replacing the old BOCUs (Borough Operational Command Units): Central North (Camden and Islington) and East Area (Havering, Redbridge and Barking & Dagenham). Rumour has it that the new Commissioner has said that the BCUs are staying no matter what and the One Met Model are now refereeing to the 'trials' as 'pathfinders', clearly indicating that they aren't trials, but the mergers are here to stay and are coming to a Borough near you in the foreseeable future. So, I thought it would be a good idea to create a mega thread for BCUs, so we can talk about how the trials are going, what your experience is like, rumours about who's going next and so on.... So, add your questions and tell us what you know and what your experience of the BCUs is like.
  3. Rashan Charles death: Met police officer investigated for gross misconduct Press Association the Guardian | Wednesday 13 September 2017 14.38 BST A Metropolitan police officer is being investigated for gross misconduct over the death of Rashan Charles, a young black man who was restrained after a police chase in north-east London, the Independent Police Complaints Commission has said. https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/sep/13/rashan-charles-death-met-police-officer-investigated-for-gross-misconduct WHY AM I NOT SURPRISED!
  4. Chief inspectors and commander posts will still exist beyond 2018. Commissioner Cressida Dick has cancelled plans to abolish two ranks in the Met. Last year Police Oracle revealed the force planned to do away with chief inspector and commander posts in 2018. But its subsequently-appointed force leader has called a halt to the idea. A spokesman said “removing two ranks is not the best approach to achieve the outcomes we need”. Police Oracle also revealed that the force had already spent more than £27,000 on the promotion process for potential future chief inspectors before deciding to drop the ranks – with more than 229 officers having applied. The force spokesman said: “The commissioner has signalled very clearly that the Met will introduce flatter management structures and that she is increasing the pace of reform. "However, after extensive consultation, and due to the step-change to our operational context in recent weeks, she has concluded that removing two ranks entirely is not the best approach to achieve the outcomes we need at this time. “In the coming months we will see flatter leadership structures that empower officers to use discretion and make decisions in different units across the Met. “We will also continue to work closely with the NPCC lead on reforms to leadership structures and maintain our place at the forefront of this work.” Reducing the number of ranks in policing was a key recommendation from the College of Policing’s leadership review and the UK’s largest force appeared to be leading the way in implementing it. Met Fed branch chairman Ken Marsh welcomed the change of heart. “It wasn’t thought out very well to begin with, now the Commissioner has given it proper thought I think what will happen will be planned far better,” he said. On the potential for inspectors to gain promotion to chief inspector ranks again, he added: “They were in the process when it stopped, I’m pleased for them and inspectors will now be able to become chief inspectors.” View on Police Oracle
  5. Scotland Yard officers have used force against a disproportionately large number of black people in recent months. Official figures released on Tuesday showed that the number of people of every other ethnic group against whom force was used was relatively low. Full Story - Guardian
  6. Force is pressing ahead with scheme which some officers say is turning them away from the job. The mergers have already pushed control room staff to threaten strike action. A Metropolitan Police pilot scheme to merge London boroughs into single command units will continue despite it causing some officers to “hate” going to work. Towards the end of last year Barking and Dagenham, Redbridge and Havering all merged into one with Camden and Islington also combining. These Basic Command Units (BCUs) are overseen by a chief superintendent, with four superintendents each working under them. Vehicles, technology, personnel and buildings are shared between the boroughs within the units in an attempt to save the Met money. Back in November last year before the scheme was launched Deputy Assistant Commissioner Mark Simmons, who is in charge of the pilot, said: “Change is important for the Met to remain operationally effective in the changing policing landscape.” The chairman of the London Assembly police and crime committee expressed concerns about the mergers and insisted the measure should not be “driven by cost cutting”. Now a number of officers working under the new arrangements appear to be unhappy about their new working conditions, voicing their concerns via social media. At the beginning of July a leaked paper appeared to imply the full programme of the controversial mergers will go ahead despite the pilots not yet being fully assessed. Later the same month control room staff threatened to go on strike during the Notting Hill Carnival over the stresses Pathfinder was putting them under and dangers it posed to the public. The PCS union said at the time: “We have been pushing for months for improvements to new ways of working that we feared would compromise the safety of staff and members of the public. “Members had been telling us about the increased stress of working the new ‘Pathfinder’ system and the risks they posed to the public.” The strike was eventually avoided after the Met provided “assurances” to increase the amount of staff by 135 and invest in new computer systems. Despite the issues and controversy caused by the pilot the force is determined to press ahead and denied rumours they were rolling back any of the units. A spokesman said: “The Basic Command Unit pathfinders, or test sites, in Camden and Islington (North Central Area Command Unit) and Barking & Dagenham, Havering and Redbridge (East Area Command Unit) are ongoing, after going fully live at the end of April 2017. “The pathfinders are a genuine test and the Met continues to learn from the way they are operating. “Each of the pathfinders have thrown up different challenges, and the Met are adapting the model to overcome these challenges. “Neither pathfinder site is being rolled back but we are making changes to make the model more efficient. “The purpose of the pathfinder sites is to test the model and make changes as necessary before we roll it out more widely. “The Mayor and the Commissioner will together, towards the end of 2017, consider the evidence from the Pathfinders and the views of stakeholders, before determining the manner of any further roll-out across London.” View on Police Oracle
  7. Hello all!   Welcome to the 31st October 2014, and the day that we are opening the doors on Police Community to you all, at some point in the next 12 hours!   Please use this topic as the general MetChat thread within this area of the forum!   Looking forward to seeing some new / old user names posting in here!
  8. Home Visit

    It's been a while since I've posted on this blog, mainly because nothing's been happening. I attended my medical which went smoothly, but involved waiting for 4 hours with other candidates in the piping hot waiting room of a converted semi detached. Aside from that it's just been chasing up references and trying to extend my son's vocabulary past "dog", "mum", "dad" and "gone" (which is apparently now a noun used to refer to a bin) Late this morning I got a call from my local Neighbourhood Sergeant asking for a home visit. Nearly an hour later and the kettle was on and I was panic shaving the mess that I haven't bothered to touch since my interview at the start of the month. The home visit was the part of the process that really intrigued me, having not made it to this stage before it was a complete unknown although some of the saints on here gave me at least an inkling of what to expect. The first test was a fairly simple one - white tea none. I didn't get any feedback on that but there was no vomiting so I'm taking it as a pass The visit essentially consisted of an ID check, around 20 questions designed to find out my attitudes towards drugs, binge drinking and right wing political groups as well as making sure that there was nothing that I hadn't failed to declare on my vetting forms. The questions were fairly formal, but after they were out the way I had an opportunity to sit and have a cuppa with a serving supervisor who could answer any questions about the job in a formal setting. Just the vetting to wait back on now so hopefully this time next week I'll have a final offer of employment Hopefully...
  9. Recruitment drive is aimed at individuals inside and outside policing. There are 32 different roles available as part of the initiative The Metropolitan Police Service is set to recruit 100 “change professionals” to help “transform” delivery of service. It says the force is “ever evolving” and needs “talented” people to help it adapt against a “backdrop of ever changing crime patterns and a challenging budget.” As such the force is advertising 100 vacancies across 32 different roles and is looking for people from inside and outside policing. Director of people and change in the Met’s human resources department, Robin Wilkinson, says the type of work being undertaken is unrivalled. He said: “The breadth of work our new Transformation Directorate will undertake is unrivalled in any industry. The work impacts on how the Met safeguards the most vulnerable people in society, how the Met tackles and disrupts crime, through to ensuring we have the right people available to respond quickly and professionally in times of need. "We are looking for change professionals from a variety of disciplines working in Portfolio and Programme Delivery, Integrated Design and Delivery and Business Change roles. Professionals with experience in communications and engagement, risk management, operating model design and project management are just a few of those we need to ensure our team is complete. "In joining the Met you will be part of our Transformation Directorate. You will work in a professional change role which will face the challenge of delivering complex change right across the Met without risking operational delivery." Sam Upton, a blueprint and insight manager at the transformation directorate described the work the department does as ‘hugely rewarding’. He said: “I have always been a passionate problem solver and was initially attracted to the Met by the prospect of tackling some of London's most challenging issues. "That passion has taken me on a hugely varied and rewarding journey over the last 12 years to include supporting operating model design work covering virtually all the Met's local policing services in London. "I can't think of many organisations where you can take that professional journey whilst at the same time having so much fun, making so many lifelong friends and being so regularly humbled by the dedication and professionalism of others." View on Police Oracle
  10. Lord Ian Blair warns the Met will be a quarter less in size than when he left the force. Lord Ian Blair A former Metropolitan Police commissioner says it would be "an absurdity" to further cut the force's funding after recent events in London. Lord Ian Blair called for a rethink over plans to cut hundreds of millions of pounds from the force's budget, saying this would leave the Met a quarter of the size it was when he left office in 2008. London Mayor Sadiq Khan has warned the city has lost "thousands of police staff" since 2010, while the current Met Commissioner Cressida Dick said she would "obviously" be seeking extra resources. "I think the crucial point now is to understand the cuts being considered, certainly for the Met, need reconsideration," Lord Blair told BBC Radio 4's Today programme. "As far as I understand it they're supposed to lose a further £400 million by 2021, on top of £600 million in the last few years. "That means the Met must be a quarter less in size than when I left." Lord Blair, now a crossbench peer, went on to call for "no cuts", adding: "Looking at what is happening, the idea of continuously cutting the police service's budget seems an absurdity at this stage." Deputy Commissioner Craig Mackay has said the Westminster and London Bridge attacks had put a "lot of stretch" on the Metropolitan Police. The Metropolitan Police Federation has also warned that officers are fatigued and "stretched beyond belief" after a string of major incidents. Lord Blair said these incidents would put extra pressure on specialist officers such as counter terrorism, adding: "It just seems a very strange time to be reducing the capabilities of a service which is holding the line against some terrible events." The former commissioner said neighbourhood policing is crucial to building trust with communities, but is very difficult to maintain when major incidents happen and officers are needed elsewhere. Lord Blair said it was "no surprise" Monday's attack at Finsbury Park Mosque had happened. "There is this kind of new landscape of terrorism, which the new commissioner Cressida Dick described, where the weapons are knives from kitchens or just hiring a van," he said. "It does create a very difficult problem for the police." View on Police Oracle
  11. Hello there. I have noticed that the Met are using strange white shirts that seem to appear normal when the tac vest is worn but when the vest is removed it is clear that the middle section seems to be wicking. I have also noticed that they do not have radio loops which seems to be a bit weird to me why they don't have loops. I think these new designs are only for short sleeved. Are the original short sleeved shirts still worn or issued or have they been totally replaced by this new design. Are there any wicking style shirts for long sleeved as well? also been wondering what if someone wanted to clip their radio onto the shirt?? cheers guys
  12. A Metropolitan Police officer who has been crawling the London Marathon in a gorilla costume since the race began on Sunday morning has completed the 26-mile route. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/29/mr-gorilla-met-police-officer-finally-finishes-london-marathon/
  13. Six officers were surrounded and attacked as violence erupted during an arrest in north London. Full Story - Evening Standard Sign of things to come? Hot weather, gangs of youths attacking police officers? The goodwill from the public after the Westminster attack has not lasted long, alot of comments on social media asking why the police needed to send so many resources to deal with officers being attacked.
  14. Idea is not being ruled out at present. Following the appointment of Cressida Dick as the new Commissioner of the Metropolitan Police speculation has turned to which issues take priority in her burgeoning in-tray. One which the government has hinted previously could be removed from the force is national responsibility for coordinating counter-terrorism. The Home Affairs Select Committee has previously called for this change to happen, and although the government said in 2015 it would not imminently change anything, the Home Office is currently not ruling out such a change. Terrorism analyst Dr Dave Sloggett was formerly opposed to the idea of transferring responsibility, but he now thinks there is a “good case” for it. He said: “I was against the idea some time ago when the National Crime Agency was struggling. Since that time it has improved. “When you consider the overlap which exists between terrorism and organised crime, you can see an emerging argument for the idea and that it should be given to ‘Britain’s FBI’. “While Cressida Dick has expertise on terrorism, she actually has a very good understanding of the many challenges the Met faces other than terrorism, which is a national issue dealt with across the entire country, and which it could be better for a Commissioner to do without.” But retired head of the National Counter Terrorism and Security Office Chris Phillips disagrees. He told PoliceOracle.com: “We’ve got an arrangement under which things have worked for many years as they are, I can understand why they might want to change it, it’s a cross-border role, but the system we’ve got is tried and tested, we’ve had it in place for many years and we’ve not had a major terrorist attack for years.” Former Thames Valley deputy chief constable Brian Langston said community relationships must be preserved, whatever the model. He said: “Whilst shifting the responsibility for counter-terrorism to the National Crime Agency is worthy of serious consideration, it must be remembered that the seeds of terrorism often lie within disaffected communities. “Misguided and vulnerable young people are often targeted for radicalisation and groomed to carry out acts of violent extremism. “There would need to remain a strong bond between any national agency charged with this responsibility, and local neighbourhood teams to ensure that community intelligence is not lost. Terrorism is both a local and global issue." When asked if changing the national responsibility for counter-terrorism to the National Crime Agency was on the agenda, a Home Office spokesman simply replied: “This government is committed to do doing everything we can to keep our families, communities and country safe, so will always look to ensure that collaboration between police and the agencies working on counter-terrorism and organised crime is as effective as possible." Last week the NCA announced five new appointments to its leadership team including the hiring of Essex Deputy Chief Constable Matthew Horne as a deputy director and Merseyside Assistant Chief Nikki Holland as director of investigations. Current deputy David Armond has announced his retirement from the organisation. Read on Police Oracle
  15. Hi all, So I'm through the paper sift and have my assessment on the 27th March and have a quick q for anyone who might have been through the MET Special Assessment recently. In the documentation I've been sent it says there is a written test and interview. Can anyone tell me if the written part entails a numeracy test? Numeracy has always been a weak point of mine and if it is included I'd like to try my best to remember all of that wonderful maths I hated at school 12 years ago... Thanks, sim
  16. Start date 2017

    Anyone on London Met start date April 2017? I am starting my internal CKP in March.
  17. I'm joining on 30 Jan. Any one?
  18. Start Date

    Any tips on what to study before starting?
  19. Can someone please tell me the pass mark for the interview for the Met Police?? and if you do bad in the interview would it be a fail?
  20. Evening, so I've received an email from Enlighten the company running the Internal CKP, giving me my login details for the course etc and then it says this... *** Don’t forget to bring your printed and signed student contract (this is supplied to you by the MPS so if you have not received it please contact MPS Recruitment as we cannot assist with this) So we're meant to bring these signed contacts but I haven't received anything. Anyone else received their contract yet? Or is the met just being the met?
  21. Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe is retiring in February 2017. What do people think of his time in role? https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/sep/29/sir-bernard-hogan-howe-to-retire-as-met-police-commissioner
  22. Hey, I was hoping someone could share some light. I have done my day 2 8 weeks ago and I have heard nothing. My current specials force have told me the met have contacted them, so I'm guessing I'm going through vetting. How long does this take and what are peoples experiences in this stage? Thank you
  23. Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-37762369 The Metropolitan Police Service could struggle to recruit 600 extra firearms officers within two years, the Met Police Federation has warned. It represents rank and file officers and said many are reluctant to become firearms specialists, subjected to long investigations after a fatal shooting. In the wake of the Paris attacks Met Police Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe said there would be 600 more firearms officers to protect London. The Met has 100 new officers to date. Image captionDeputy chief constable Simon Chesterman said about 50 of the Met Police's new recruits had come from the Sussex and Essex Police force areas About 1,000 applicants have applied to be trained in the use of firearms and a force spokesman said it was "more than satisfied not only with the quantity of the applications, but also with the quality." However, the national lead for armed policing, deputy chief constable Simon Chesterman, said he only expected to get about half of the suitable applicants through the rigorous training process, which hampered speedy recruitment. He added: "I think the greatest threat to delivering the uplift [extra officers] is officers' fears about what they will face in the event they have to discharge a firearm and they are really concerned about what will happen to them post incident." Retired Met Police officer Anthony Long was cleared in 2015 of the unlawful killing of suspected armed robber Azelle Rodney whom he shot dead in 2005. Mr Long said: "I am the worst case scenario. "Non-firearms officers, who might be considering a position as a firearms officer, are rightly saying to themselves, why would I put myself and my family through that, what is the gain, because you don't get paid any more for being a firearms officer?" Image captionEx-Met firearms officer Anthony Long said: "I went out on over 1,000 operations and opened fire on three separate occasions." Home Office figures show the total number of armed officers has fallen in the Met Police by about 717 people since March 2010 when there were 2,856 firearms officers compared to 2,139 in March 2016. The reduction was largely due to cuts in police budgets, the Met Police Federation said. Federation chairman Ken Marsh said: "We really are struggling to recruit. "I think at the moment the commissioner said [he wanted] 600, we are not even halfway there yet. "I think the next batch is going to be far harder because there is only a certain pool that you are taking these officers from." The increase in firearms officers for the capital was part of a national plan to increase the UK's armed response teams, mainly funded by the government. The officers were due to be deployed within two years of the announcement in April. Image captionAn increased number of firearms officers has been promised at some of the capital's most famous locations Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) deputy chair Sarah Green said "We recognise the challenging and dangerous circumstances in which firearms officers operate but it is right that when there is a fatality there is an independent investigation. Our independent scrutiny should not cause any officer to be concerned about taking on a firearms role." In the past six years the IPCC has completed 23 investigations into the use of police firearms, of which seven cases involved fatalities. It said in 21 of those cases, including six fatal shootings, no firearms officer involved "was at any time treated as a suspect by the IPCC". "We are working hard to reduce the amount of time our work takes but many firearms investigations involving a fatality are complex and the public rightly have an expectation of thorough scrutiny," Ms Green added.
  24. This is the shocking moment a police officer appeared to drag a terrified 13-year-old girl in handcuffs across the ground 'like a piece of meat' Full Story - Daily Mail
  25. I've been emailed saying I start my CKP on Saturday, every Saturday and Sunday for 10 (or 12 weeks), however I was under the assumption doing the internal CKP it would be full time Monday-Friday. Weekends I can't do it as I work, and I have to give 3 weeks notice to my workplace, and I've JUST been notified of the CKP today which starts THIS saturday! I've already spoken to my workplace and I cannot get time off for 10 weekends. Any help guys?

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