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  1. Rank: Inspector Length of Service 13 Years Role Duty Officer Shift 0700-1600 hours I've not written one of these for years. In part, this is because between 2015 and 2020 I worked in a unit where most of the work was relatively secretive and not suitable for writing up. However, I have since moved back out into uniformed policing and have gone up two ranks to Inspector. I am now a "Duty Officer" in an inner-city location. Essentially, I am the officer responsible for a whole shift of constables and sergeants, the most senior person on duty who takes charge of an incident in its initial stages and ensures everything is done properly. I am also responsible for lots of other things: complaints, reviewing serious threats to life, hate crimes, and the HR needs and development of 50-odd officers. I also try and spend as much time as possible out on patrol and turn up to incidents to support officers and pitch in as and when I can. (I surprised an officer who was guesting on my team recently when I was first on scene at an incident and took all the statements and arrested the suspect.... I'm still a copper, just about!). I felt it would be interesting to cover the sorts of things a Duty Officer does; most accounts on this website often seem to be of those young in service and I've not seen much input from officers who have supervisory responsibilities. It may serve to give some people an insight into what promotion may involve - there are many specialisms in the police, and I see leadership as a distinct specialism in itself. That said, I have the greatest respect for those who spend their whole careers at constable or sergeant rank: these are the backbone of the service, and the most specialised officers, experts in their fields, are those who have spent their careers dedicated to investigating the most serious crimes, using the most specialist kit, or being up-to-date in respect of the latest developments in policy, procedure, or technology. As a leader I can't know as much as the officers under me - I don't do case files every day, nor do I arrest people as often as I would like. My job is to ensure that my officers can do their job as best as possible, and to underwrite the risks that they take on. So what does a "typical shift" look like. Well, as any uniformed police officer would tell you, there is no such thing. What follows is an account of a real shift that took place a couple of months ago. It is not embellished in any way. I arrived at the station at about 0620 hours, got changed, and was in the supervisors' office about 10 minutes later. I always arrive on duty early, this is so I am not in a rush, can take the handover from the earlier shift - letting the previous shift's inspector go off duty, have a cup of tea, check my emails, and generally not be in a rush. I walk in and have a chat with the night duty inspector. I find out what has gone on during the night, and what is on my place this morning. Today, there are a couple of complaints against police that need looking at: people who are not happy. I need to research the basic circumstances of the complaint and establish what needs doing. Sometimes just explaining police policy and powers, or getting an update for a victim will suffice. Sometimes the complaint needs to be formally recorded and sent to the Professional Standards Department. Communication skills, knowledge of law and policy, and a good ear are key to dealing with these effectively. I will ring the complainants at a more sociable hour - time allowing. Apart from that, not much has happened in the past 24 hours that is still ongoing and that requires me to take any action. After a bit of small-talk with the outgoing inspector he leaves to go home to bed. I turn to the sergeants, who are having their own handover with the night-duty sergeants, and ask them what the numbers look like today: it is a sad fact of modern policing that we often seem to be under strength all too often. There are often abstractions due to events, protests, training, court, sickness, and leave (if they can get it!), but today doesn't seem to bad. I have three sergeants on duty today (out of five) and that is pretty much my minimum strength for supervisors. They are a very capable bunch, and I consider myself luck that I can rely on such a well-gelled bunch of great skippers. If I didn't have them I couldn't run my team. After a bit of small talk we head over to do the morning briefing with the team. It is 0655 hours. The duty-sergeant for the day always leads the briefing, they give the PCs the postings for the day and gives any particular taskings out. I will give any updates that I need to give and try and say something inspirational, funny, (I fear I come across like someone making "dad jokes" in the main, or mention something that happened on a previous shift - which is often something more serious). Today, literally as we were walking away from the briefing and officers are inspecting their cars the radio crackles to life: "The ambulance service has been called to a baby in cardiac arrest at Flat B, 43 Birch Street. Unit for immediate attendance please" It is 0703 hours. I don't have to say anything. Already, officers are diving into cars and telling the control room that they will run. I run back to the Supervisors office: "Are you going guv?" "Absolutely. Have you got the car keys?" The sergeant and I jump into our car and race to the scene. What is going through my mind? So much.... Have we got paramedics running? Who is at the scene? Is this purely a medical situation or has a crime been committed? How will the officers deal with this? What does the policy say? I can't imagine a more horrendous call. Briefly I think about my own baby daughter and feel emotion rising. I push that thought to one side as quickly as it arises, I can't go down that path now. As we race to the scene there are sporadic updates: the mother is hysterical and has said "I smothered her". I'm the second police unit on scene. A paramedic has also arrived. I activate my body worn camera and run into the house. Officers are doing CPR on the tiny body of a two month old child in an upstairs bedroom. A paramedic is setting up their equipment. The mother is hysterically screaming: "I killed her, She's dead, she's dead!" She is, running around and getting in the way of those doing their best to save the baby. I feel that whatever I do it will be the wrong thing. I grab her and pull her into another room: "let them do their job. The best chance she has is for them to do their job". I try and get mum's name and baby's name. For a minute or two I try say woefully inadequate platitudes as I block mum from he baby. I'm conscious of more paramedics arriving, and I call up on the radio that I need more police officers. Not because I want to be relieved from dealing with the mother, but because I know that I need to coordinate the response to this incident. Even as I'm grappling with mum, I'm wondering if this is a crime - even if it is not, I will need to secure the scene, I am thinking about getting the officers doing CPR rotated out, I need to get the Ops Room to be doing intelligence checks. It feels like an hour, but it is probably only 2 or 3 minutes before the next police car arrives and I thrust a PC into the room to deal with mum. At that point I walk out of the address and sit in the car. This often makes me feel guilty. My instinct is to be in the thick of it and be dealing directly with those involved. However, that is not my job. My job is to coordinate the response. To this I need to understand what everyone is doing, what needs doing, and get those tasks completed. A sergeant is in the house coordinating the actions there, I am one step back and calling up to get intelligence checks done, I am speaking to the ambulance service incident commander about the information that they have, ensuring I have sufficient officers on scene, and so on. The baby is pronounced dead. So many questions arise: intelligence suggests that there was a child protection plan in place, there was a comment about smothering the baby on the call, where are the other children? I have to ensure the correct tone is set - on the one hand this is a terrible tragedy and we have to deal with the matter sensitively. On the other, this could be a crime scene. I try to establish as much information as possible. I coordinate numerous tasks and brief the CID. I am also concerned about my officers. As soon as first aid has finished I call out those that were directly involved: two PCs come out looking shell shocked. As they walk out one breaks down in tears and I sit them both in a police car outside. What can I say? "It's the worst thing you can deal with as a copper. It's ok to cry" and rather uselessly place my hand on her shoulder. I arrived with one sergeant, and I task one of the remaining two to take accompany the officers directly involved to a short debrief with the ambulance service; I ask her to offer the officers involved in the CPR to go home (getting them a lift home) if they so wish. One clearly can't continue working, a short time later they get taken home, the other wants to roll onto the next call - I make sure he goes out three-up in a car, so has some space and capacity to "tap out" should he need to. Mum and baby go to hospital (not the mortuary), I remain at the scene. The next hour or so is something of a numb blur as I make phone call, take notes, brief senior officers, and speak to colleagues. But by about half past nine I'm ready to leave the scene, intending to head back to the station to do paperwork. However, it wasn't to be: literally as I'm getting back into the car the radio crackles to life again - "there is a man standing on the wrong side of the railings nine stories up in a block of flats". A police car races to the scene and within a couple of minutes the officer, with a sound of slight panic in her voice, confirms that a man is standing in such a precarious position. She asks for a negotiator. The control room state that only the duty inspector can call a negotiator. The attending officer is one of my most experienced officers and who is the epitome of calm and professionalism. However, I can hear a hint of panic in her voice. "Control, if PC 4312 need a negotiator, she needs a negotiator. On my authority, please call one". I'm already racing to the scene. Ten minutes later I arrive at the base of a large urban tower block. I look up and I can see a man hanging off the edge nine stories up. He looks like he is ready to jump any second. A couple of other police cars have arrived and I instruct them to put cordons around the block. I am with a sergeant in my car, so I instruct them to coordinate the cordons. I head up to the ninth floor. I am conscious of too much chatter on the main radio channel. I don't want to spook the man with comments on the radio, so I get the channels "split" so we are on a spare channel and instruct all officers to turn their radios down. As I arrive on the floor I come across two PCs trying to speak to the man from about ten metres away. I stand out of sight in the stairwell and get a PC to come back to give me a briefing. Can we grab him? No, he could jump long before we got to him, does he want anything? No, he isn't saying anything meaningful? What do we know about him? What could we use to emotionally appeal to him? Not much.... It is a really hard situation to be in. How do we persuade him to come back over? I try and formulate a plan in my stairwell, but my options are limited. I request for the ambulance to be on standby, and request that the fire brigade attend with their rescue equipment. However, it soon becomes apparent that the help that either of them could offer was limited. After about an hour the negotiators arrive. In the meantime I have been hiding just around the corner listening to my officers attempting to get through to the man. I have also ensured officers have cordoned off the building and are ushering away any residents that come out. In a busy inner-city borough this is really no mean feat. Some of the officers from the previous call had rolled straight onto this call. Thankfully, most haven't. I brief the negotiators - interestingly, the decision to deploy them, and how to deploy them, is mine. They are a tactical option. I take their advice - obviously - but it is up to me how they are used. There have been other incidents when I have withdrawn them and resort to other tactics. As the Duty Officer, the buck stops with me. In this instance, there is very little that I can do apart from use negotiators. I don't have the time or space here to divulge the blow-by-blow account of how the negotiators engaged with the man, or the numerous considerations I made, however, the incident continued for another four hours. The initial PCs that attended, and I, remained behind the man - on the balcony and in the stairwell just behind - throughout. Thankfully, he eventually decided to come back over the balcony, the incident was resolved successfully and he was detained under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983. Obviously, once he came back over there were various other administrative things to do before I left the scene - I am virtually always last to leave. As it should be. I got back to the police station at about 4pm. Suddenly it hit me, that I had not eaten or drunk since I had woken up that morning. I was exhausted and faint. One of the late-turn sergeants was going out for food and I gratefully put in an order with him. I spent an hour and a half writing briefing notes and ensuring all the paperwork was done, before I eventually left for work. Before I left I spoke to my counterpart inspector at a neighbouring station. I agreed with him that for the first two hours of the next shift he would cover any calls on my section. The following day, I told all officers involved in the incident with the baby to remain behind after parade. They needed a debrief. I took their breakfast order and went to McDonalds and bought them each a breakfast, took it back to the nick, and we sat down for an hour just going through what happened. The point I repeatedly made to them, and I make regularly to whoever will listen frankly, is that the amount of trauma we are exposed to as police officer just isn't normal. What a normal person may experience in a lifetime we will experience in a year or even a month. It is ok to be affected by this and help is available - be that informally, having a laugh with your colleagues or a beer with your mates, but also more formally through counselling or health referrals. We talk through what we all did and why (one officer who just arrived had a dead baby just thrust into their arms unexpectedly, others did CPR, others dealt with family). We discuss how we felt. I think it's a healthy thing to do: it is important to take a break from the radio - even for an hour - to just take stock. The officer who had to go home is in a worse state and had gone sick: I ensure that a proper package of support is put in place and I keep in contact with her. I then move straight into debriefing the officers involved in the second incident. The first officers on scene got a glowing email from the head negotiator, but, again, I am more concerned with whether they are OK. They seem alright, and are reassured that the incident ended well and the negotiators were happy with their efforts. I put them up for a commendation and the superintendent soon calls them in for an award. ............and that's it. Just one day. A horrendous day, no doubt, but I've got a couple of dozen similar stories form the past year to recount. Thankfully we don't normally have more than one of these on a single shift. But, one thing is for certain - when it comes to trauma, what we police officers deal with, certainly in the quantity we do, isn't normal. To understand this is key, and it there is nothing shameful about seeking help if you need it. As I came out of the debrief one of the probationers came up to me and said: "Can I ask, are you OK sir? It's just I don't imagine anyone thinks to ask you." Look after each other.
    7 points
  2. What if they don't want to identify as a cow at all? The vehicle didn't look like it was going very fast, I would have thought he'd have been leathering it. Anyway, this thread is rapidly heading toward the locker room material, I'd steak my reputation on it.
    7 points
  3. We can all have differing opinions but, in the end of the day we are all, or have been part of a big family. May I wish everyone as Merry a Christmas as far as is possible. All please stay safe and stay well and let us all hope for a better 2021. 🎅🎅🎅🎅🎅🎅
    7 points
  4. I really don’t see a problem with recruits getting something out of their training, my time in the PSNI depot earned me an HND in Policing. It only took 6 months. There was talk of being able to top it up to a full degree but that never came to fruition. There are two massive problems in terms of police recruitment and training for me at the moment. One is the length of time it will take for cops to land on shift and be useful and two is the training they’re receiving. Training now happens in corporate, stuffy classrooms that are deemed safe spaces and come with “trigger warnings”. Nobody can possibly be told they’re wrong, or get bawled out for being insubordinate to staff. Staff aren’t staff, they’re on first name terms with their students. They don’t parade, they don’t do drill, there’s no PT. OST is a leisurely chat about some techniques and what kit you’ve got on your belt and some lack lustre scenarios. Bring back proper police training, bring back staff, standing up when they enter the room, the recruit canteen, intake/squad seniority, drill, inspections, breaking people down and building them back up, PT sessions, rig runs and milling in OST (I’ve still got a chipped tooth!). Then and only then will we have probies that have been punched in the face (with boxing gloves and head guard mind), sworn at, screamed and shouted at, told they need to get things right or there will be consequences and with a bit of team ethos, organisational pride and a sense of accomplishment in themselves and squad mates. Police training has gone from being difficult and challenging to essentially turn up and pass. The problem isn’t the caliber of applicant, it’s the training regimes. It’s too soft and it’s not sorting the wheat from the chaff.
    6 points
  5. The story has already gone AWOL from the Guardian website which is odd given how much attention they paid to the chorus of demands that our response was OTT and for the Commissioner to resign. I also not the lack of politicians coming out and eating their words. Where is the young Labour MP who immediately condemned the police response yet a week later wanted time to assess what had happened in Bristol? The HMIC have had two weeks to assess and reflect and have not found the police response to be wanting so where is that MP or even Sadiq Khan now?
    6 points
  6. Do you think anti lock down protesters are being gunned downed in the street with their civil democracy suspended for a military junta? No. Some people in the UK do not know what real oppression or a police state actually looks like, yet they kid themselves that they are living in one.
    6 points
  7. I think it is forgotten that we are not the moral guardians of society. Each citizen has the obligation to speak out against injustice and take action where they see discrimination or ignorance. Too much onus is placed upon us to educate and guide people, what are the department for culture doing, what are schools doing, what’s the local council doing......what is society as a whole doing to promote decency and harmony? Our core role has been eroded almost beyond repair, we constantly step up where other organisations shy away, shrug their shoulders and say “I dunno”. We spend more time dealing with mentally ill people and missing people than we do with crime. We fail victims every day because other agencies fail us, dumping their work loads on our doorstep. That to me is why public perception of the police is so poor, because we are failed by our colleagues in social care, the health service, Highways Agency, the local council.....the list is almost endless. 99.9% of us joined to deal a blow to crime and protect the vulnerable within society, let us do it, and we will relish in it. Keep tying our hands and bogging us down in a quagmire of other agencies work and we simply cannot. As for standards in the police, my god have they dropped. On Monday I watched as an intake of new students walked through the doors of the training centre.....being mollycoddled, calling staff by their first names, rather than “STAFF”. Laughing and joking with them and gradually introduced to the force. Where’s the shock of the capture, where have the proper “STAFF” gone? Why are we doing these new officers a disservice and easing them into to life as a police officer? It’s not a job in a call centre, you don’t need an induction, you need to be instructed, you need to be told in no uncertain terms what the job is and what it expects of you, you need to know you could leave your house and never come home.
    6 points
  8. The issue isn't whether racism exists, it always has and always will, the issue is whether racism exists at a legal, political, educational and economic level in the western world, and it simply DOESN'T, at least not against the black communities in the UK and US. The argument however can be made that it does exist against the white community when there are racial/diversity quotas in favour of minority communities that openly, directly and unapologetically discriminate against white candidates/students/employees etc. The concept that because one community represents a certain % of a population, it should also only represent the exact same % of police encounters, arrests and imprisonments is moronic. These figures aren't driven by any conscious design, they are the result of a multitude of socio-economic factors, most usually coming down to factors such as 'culture', education and income. These factors are universal when looking at ANY country's representation of offenders. I policed Scotland, which is 98% white and ALL of these where the exact same as they are in the black neighbourhoods of London, so why isn't anyone marching for equality of white council estate residents in Easterhouse, Drumchapel, the Gorbals, Govanhill and Drumchapel, who overwhelmingly represent the disproportionately highest percentages of low income, less education and *SURPRISE SURPRISE* most offending? Short answer: they 're white, so it doesn't matter. I'm a pretty left-leaning person in my ideologies. I'm in favour of high-taxation for the wealthy and corporations, free education at ALL levels, free healthcare, social benefits and housing, the allocation of public funds to underprivileged communities to promote investment, I support equal legal rights for same-sex relationships and I support the legalisation of certain drugs (among many other leftist views). This doesn't mean however that I also support the complete and utter abolishment of personal responsibility. If you want 'equality' you need to recognise that with all the rights you have in a civilised society, you also have obligations, one of these being to not commit crime. In my opinion, NOT committing crime is one of the easiest obligations to fulfil that anyone has ever had: simply do NOTHING and you won't get in trouble. The fact that this is viewed as 'oppressive' and part of 'systemic racism' when people are expected to not offend is pure lunacy. In what fantasy utopia do these people live in where stabbing, murdering, stealing, robbing and violently assaulting people ISN'T a crime? I certainly wouldn't want to live in such a society. BLM and other woke-based ideologies are not the least bit interested in equality. They want dominance; to dominate the narrative and the decision-making. They openly accuse anyone of wanting to engage in conversation as 'oppressors' and that 'words are violence'. Does this sound like rational, balanced people that ought to have ANY political power? Not to me they don't, and I'm actually a mixed-race immigrant who spent a good chunk of time LIVING in one of the aforementioned Glaswegian council estates! They have formed a dangerous religion and dogmatic narrative and I genuinely believe them to be a serious threat to national stability.
    5 points
  9. Am I the only one wondering how he trained the cats to pee in the water pistol?
    5 points
  10. I do wish the national service calls would finally go away. No idea why stuffing our military with a bunch of reluctant criminal children is supposed to be good for anyone. Properly funded education and social care? Likely to have a far greater impact. Our care homes are stuffed with children who the state have entirely failed across the board. They are just waiting to become victims or offenders and no one seems remotely appalled.
    5 points
  11. As @BizzieBeesays, policing has been in disarray since long before 2010. I joined in the early 1980s when policing was in disarray, but not as in as much disarray as it was in the more corrupt days of the 1970s and 1960s. Here are some ‘rules’ about policing that I have learned - you won’t find these in books: everyone knows how to police better than the officer doing the policing; it was better 10/20/30 years ago - this applies in any era; people support the police until they are engaged with the police; what is happening to me at this time is the most important and urgent thing that the police should be dealing with; the police should spend more time dealing with speeding drivers; the police should spend more time on nuisance youths and not so much time stopping people driving their cars; the police should spend more time on ‘real’ crime and not harassing bored teenagers; the police should spend more time dealing with speeding drivers; If the offender for my crime is not caught, charged, convicted, given a severe enough sentence then it is the fault of the police; the police should turn up and resolve my problem within half an hour, even though my problem has been years in the making and at least 50% my fault.
    5 points
  12. I think you and they mistake inconvenience for oppression.🤦
    5 points
  13. The hypocrisy in the media coverage has been staggering so far. Anyone would think that the likes of Kier Starmer, Jess Phillips or Ed Davey didn't all vote for the current coronavirus restrictions on the 6th January - in fact not a single Labour or Lib Dem MP voted against them. Yet now, apparently those same rules should be abridged for a cause they support? In case there was any doubt about this cause and its legality, someone actually found the time to go to the High Court ahead of time where Mr Justice Holgate refused to put the right to protest, which we may remind ourselves is a qualified right, above the current restrictions. Yet hundreds of people felt entitled to go ahead and do it anyway, rather than hold the doorstep vigil the Met suggested. Hundreds of people who did not stir for any of the other 22 murders London has seen so far this year. At that protest, four people were arrested at least a couple of whom are very obviously actively resisting in the videos shown on the BBC. Four out of several hundred is not what strikes me as a chilling assault on collective rights, in fact it sounds like light-touch policing. This has been reported in an entirely one-sided fashion, wheeling out the usual empty vessels like Vera Baird and Sadiq Khan who generally appear when there's something critical to be said, and entirely without irony on a day when it was also reported that Russian police had detained 200 opposition figures in Moscow on the grounds that they were part of an "undesirable organisation". Maybe a sense of perspective about our own police is required here?
    5 points
  14. Be a professional witness, not a professional victim, unless you really need to go hands on and get involved. Clearly 999 is going to be the quickest way to get people to you, without PPE and an airwave. The international disco pass isn’t some sort of magic piece of plastic that is going to stop you getting battered sadly. Even the uniform isn’t enough to prevent that anymore.
    5 points
  15. I have been in long enough to see the wheel turn a few times and its currently, certainly in my area, at the bottom. I'm tired, lack any form of genuine leadership, we have dozens of new specialist units that don't do anything but have been taken from response numbers. Populated by sergeants who didn't have to apply, just got a golden handshake. I'm thinking about changing role, but I'm not sure which blazing skip I should jump into. I think I'm too institutionalised to break out elsewhere, especially after this year. I tell command we are short of staff, tired, overworked and things are unnecessarily difficult. They nod. I make a mistake and they are horrified and demand answers. Constantly being asked to do 20 things with resources to do 5 tears you down.
    5 points
  16. It was a convertible and he came out over the top!
    5 points
  17. This is part of the problem though. We are people who make it work even when it’s broken. Teams at minimum staffing?….it’s okay we will run about like headless chickens to meet demand and oh so important target times. No vehicles?……it’s okay, we will send someone to another nick to pick some cars up. File needs sorting?…..it’s okay, we will stay late, in our own time to get it done because otherwise it won’t happen. The Cons tell their Sgts that their at breaking point, their workloads are too high, they don’t get clerical, they can’t possibly do all this disclosure nonsense, the vehicles are all shagged, the IT is so broken they cant do their jobs, they can’t get leave and that civvie street during a global pandemic seems like a better option. The Sgts pass it on to the Inspector who pass it on and on and on. It eventually reaches the Chief Con, his bagman says “Sir the moral on the frontline is a bit low, maybe send out a patronising email to cheer them up next week” and that’s the solution to the problem. Nothing is ever addressed properly. It only works because we make it work, no other reason. If we stopped, it would fail. Every single year our earnings in real terms are reduced, I think since I joined, I have lost 16% of my salary or something daft because of inadequate increases. To my knowledge, they have always been below the rate of inflation. Im deskilled and indoctrinated, I simply cannot leave. It’s like an abusive relationship.
    4 points
  18. This happens pretty much every year, our wages never go up beyond inflation and we inevitably lose purchasing power. There is no appetite to pay us more, the politicians don’t want to, the public already think we’re paid enough and the federation are a toothless dragon that doesn’t push hard enough for us. It’s just the way it is. Nothing will ever change!
    4 points
  19. This thread has gone way off topic to the point that I am not sure what is being discussed. Topic closed
    4 points
  20. If you're casting stones, you need to see a doctor asap
    4 points
  21. They want to completely ignore the facts of history. Yes, our ancestors did do some awful things but they also got many things right. They took education, learning, engineering and many other things. Australia was formed by those who were transported as punishments for crimes. They formed Australia but in doing so they abused the native population. They took a culture to many parts of the world, they did a lot of good but in doing so did much harm and took great advantage of indigenous people. In South America the Portuguese and Spanish did exactly the same, as did the French and Germans in Africa. The origins of the slave trade had existed for centuries before the Roman Empire. It continued with the Arab nations and flourished in Africa when African tribes conquered and enslaved other tribes selling them to the highest bidder in the form of the British, French, Germans and a multitude of other countries. Africans enslaved by other Africans and nothing to do with race. Now as Radman says many people in this country completely confuse British history with American history and the emancipation of Slavery came from this country to, all too slowly spread around the world. Perhaps the most understood topic is history.
    4 points
  22. We've eroded British identity and imported an American one, kids grow up thinking British cops carry guns, we've somehow integrated their frankly shameful modern history into our own (I once had to correct a student on the history of Britain and how we never had government sanctioned policies on segregation i.e different buses or cafes for black people and that they're confused with US policy, they didnt believe me.) Were we perfect? No... No nation has been, especially one that led the world in the form of an empire/superpower, every modern nation has made mistakes but I hate the notion that because I am white my ancestors are somehow guilty for events they had no control of or influence over - whilst the British slave trade was underway my ancestors were sending their youngest down the coal mines of Yorkshire, living in absolute poverty as I'm sure most peoples ancestors around my way were, the vast majority of us didn't come from the 'ruling class' yet this frankly racist narrative that I am somehow 'privileged' because of my skin colour is utterly wrong - my mother was the first person on her side in the family to go to university... in her 40's... My dad who is an extremely intelligent man couldn't go to university and instead had to take an apprenticeship in electrical engineering. Most of the lads I grew up with didn't go to uni, most have ended up working trades, some have become career criminals (one I see on a frequent basis at work sadly enough consumed by drugs.) Yet lets keep pushing this stupid narrative as a society, I firmly believe one of the reasons Labour have done so poorly and lost favour with their 'traditional working class voters' is that the above narrative they've adopted simply doesn't wash with them, the middle class urbanites who have become the core of the party and are extremely privileged sure, I can see them buying into it but a working class bloke from a council estate in Rotherham certainly isn't going to swallow the narrative, their family likely had very little growing up.
    4 points
  23. Black people don’t commit crime. They don’t carry knives, so they shouldn’t be searched. They aren’t dying in their troves on the streets of the capital, at the hands of other black men, so there’s nothing to see here. It’s the fault of the racist Police. If you think any different, then you’re a racist. and you need to be cancelled. Cycle, rinse, repeat ....
    4 points
  24. I dunno, most people would draw the line at calling for the hanging of people who hold different views to their own alongside calling for people of a different race to be made slaves. What's happened is awful, this young lady was a mother of two children and I feel nothing but sadness for the impact this crime has had. I do think the BLM movement need to really take stock though and look at what has happened, reassess their view points and work out just what primary problems afflicting inner city London, largely black communities are, is it police taking knives off of people or is it the criminal element exploiting hatred, divides etc that gives criminals the freedom to intimidate and operate freely within communities that ultimately leads to shootings such as these? I know I'm likely asking too much but then again the female leader of the most prominent race rights group has been shot in the head by a bunch of cowardly gangsters, the problem obviously isn't the police... It's the criminals.
    4 points
  25. This has nothing to do with the degree apprenticeship and those of you claiming "I told you so" are just desperate to find something to support your bias. GMP has recruited over 2000 new cops over the past 4 years on the IPLDP and is STILL recruiting and delivering that training and will be till next year. However, all the issues that were raised in the article (which started in Police Oracle not the DM) are rife here too. This has more to do with how younger generations think rather than anything to do with academia. If anything from personal experience those who already have a degree when the join usually have a much better understanding of what is expected of them and subsequently perform much better than this who still think it's like Life on Mars. The issue lands mainly on the toes of training and their move to a more academic style of managing new recruits. It's all about mentoring and supporting people rather than sitting them down and having frank conversations about their underperformance and suitability for policing. It has now got to the point we are recruiting people whose English is so poor their initial training is extended to allow them to take English lessons or change their shifts so they can go to night school, when they're challenged about their behaviour they make bullying complaints that are taken seriously, BAME officers threatening to leave are removed from frontline duties to keep the BAME numbers up and as for the recruiting process. We've had people with disabilities so severe they were unable to get off the floor during PST and after 18 months of support were finally required to leave. They were clearly unable to complete the training from the very beginning. We've recruited people with PTSD who went off with stress a week into independent patrol, people with epilepsy triggered by blue flashing lights, devoutly religious officers praying in victims houses or leaving crime scenes unattended to go and pray and god knows how many who are unable to work nights despite being told several times it's part if their role BEFORE being offered the job. Not to mention incidents like this (Trainee GMP cops fined for Covid rule-busting illegal party (msn.com)) are a weekly occurrence and none ever lose their job. But, the one thing they have in common is that none were on the degree program. This is not a 'degree' issue, its an organisational failing which has been slowly happening for years.
    4 points
  26. See....it’s because they’ve never had DS an inch from their face screaming and shouting, questioning their parentage, threatening to drive a swagger stick between their ears and ride them around the square like a motorcycle! 😬
    4 points
  27. No **** Sherlock! Another foregone conclusion ? What did they expect? Most of them aren’t joining to be police constables, they’re joining to be managers!
    4 points
  28. It's an hour here. If you have to retake it is 4 hours. I think they should make the A-B 2 hours and spend an hour on "this is how you should leave the car", including how bin bags work and how to put fuel in!
    4 points
  29. Things like, "I'll need you to provide a statement sir"... "Oh sorry mate, I'm too busy / clocking off now" etc don't help.
    4 points
  30. Retailers may make large profits but they are still entitled to protection. Sadly the legislation is not the answer. Any legislation would be of no use as it is in the Courts hands to make sentences have an impact. They must stop accepting "Bleeding Heart" stories from the lawyers, not breast fed as a child, abused as a child, they have turned their lives around, they are no longer on drugs, etc, etc, etc. They must also stop giving different leniency to female offenders over male offenders. Treat them all the same.
    4 points
  31. I personally keep a very large chip pan simmering away beside my bed at all times. Should I feel like a snack in the night I deep fry something tasty. Of course it also has the advantage of being a vat of boiling oil to repel intruders. Cooking chips during the night surely can't be illegal.
    4 points
  32. As a former Army Non Commissioned Officer, I can assure you that there is no appetite whatsoever for national service from anyone currently serving. Trust me, it can be challenging enough to lead and motivate people who actually want to be there, when things are going wrong. Especially on operations, when you might be on one end of a two way shooting range. Now, imagine trying to lead a section or platoon full off individuals who don't want to be there. I will however concede that the Armed Forces do provide invaluable life experience, and qualifications for motivated individuals, who may not have achieved these through more traditional means.
    4 points
  33. So EROing case files then? Any public servant, especially medical staff should have offences committed against them highlighted and the court take appropriate action against offenders. That isn't the problem, the problem is a lack of adequate people in place to protect staff to begin with. Security at the NHS is woeful, they're often not even security but glorified parking wardens with a security uniform who refuse to intervene at the slightest hint of aggression let alone violence. I've been banging on about this for years, the railways has BTP, the Civil Nuclear industry has CNC and the Ports have their own historic constabularies, the NHS staff and patients deserve to have that added layer of protection in place. If NHS staff don't deserve it who does? Train people up properly, equip them properly and put them in place just as Hospital Police exist across the world including the commonwealth.
    4 points
  34. I bet politicians and journalists would be happy with a 58% approval rating let alone 75%, but no instead that is seen as something particularly bad, where we are vilified for doing our jobs and trying to disrupt criminal activity. I'm sure that there are some things that we can do better but equally we wouldn't need to stop and search so many IC3 males in inner city areas if young black men weren't being killed by other young black men at a disproportionate rate.
    4 points
  35. Should've cleared the street like the police told everyone to do.
    4 points
  36. If I found two or more of them there, I'd give the ringleader a £10,000 fine for organising a gathering. Much more than he'd get for the burglary.
    4 points
  37. They object because they don't want to be searched or because they had done something wrong so they were trying to distract me by causing a scene to stop me finding illegal items.
    4 points
  38. I'm sure the response from SLTs will be to get more funding and invest in officer morale by adding a TV and PlayStation 2 in the refs room for that one occasion every 9 months when front line cops get a chance to sit down for their 5 minute break and scoff a packaged sandwich whilst simultaneously doing a concern report for a verbal domestic and trying to link the 7 children and all their respective fathers to the report.
    4 points
  39. This was the biggest culture shock for me when I transferred down south as the model I worked under in Police Scotland was much better defined and implemented. Community Policing Teams were deployed to ALL calls that were not Grade 1s or 2s and handled all diaries/appointments, ASB, neighbour disputes and all non-ongoing crimes that were for 'slow-time enquiries. Response was purely for Grade 1s and 2s, to lock up, get statements, process prisoners at the station, get them charged and complete the case-file for their court appearance the next day. I worked both roles up there and enjoyed them both for different reasons. But response in England seems to be every other department's 'bitch' who gets shafted doing all the unpopular work.
    4 points
  40. In some forces, yes. As is ‘Neighbourhood policing’ and ‘proactive’. I’m aware of both factions (and served with both). I can only talk from my own experience in that Neighbourhood policing was nearly one of the laziest areas of policing. It could have been so much more, but the mentality was tea, toast, more tea, quick mooch, tea, sandwich, tea, home. Response officers weren’t able to be pro-active as they were dealing with the jobs Community teams should’ve - and woe-betide the thought of Neighbourhood policing going to shoplifting or ASB calls. Not their job, apparently. Again, an opinion which will vary greatly country-wide. Unfortunately, to this day, I cannot tell you the ‘remit’ of Neighbourhood policing officers. It’s one of life’s mysteries. Other than tea. And toast.
    4 points
  41. @Javissdaviss * Thats a sixty four dollar question if ever I heard one, but its a good one . A long time ago in the eighties sometime we had a special who was in a similar predicament. He was in his garden doing a bit of weeding when a group of youths ran into the road outside his house and started fighting .He stopped what he was doing and went to try to restore the peace as best he could . He told them straight away that he was a special constable, presumably hoping that telling them that would carry a bit more sway. Unfortunately he was assaulted and was off work for quite some time. To cut a long story short he initially had some difficulty getting compensation for loss of wages from the force. After it was looked into by someone that he had declared himself to be a special constable from the very outset there was no further problem. He was actually very well looked after by the force for quite some time, i was his section officer at the time so i heard all about it from him, i knew him very well actually and was one of our very best specials. I heard much later that had he not said/told them initially that he was a “special constable” he would have received nothing. I have no idea whether or not that situation still exists today in force policy Talking about “policy” obviously there was no National Decision Model [N.D.M ] as such to follow then and written down in every particular detail with the code of ethics/human rights etc,etc, as it is today, we just assessed the situation usually in seconds when we were there or from info given from the control room or other officers who offered info over the radio. I am retired now after a number of years in the specials, had i been in his situation i would like to think i would have done the same thing but keeping myself at six feet or a least arms length as a minimum from the protagonists so i could bring into play my best cross arm block should i need to. If i had passed by on the other side of the road so to speak how could i have shown my face in the police club that night for a pint [smiley face here] So just for what its worth, my advice would be to sum up the situation by doing a quick NDM if you are unsure.or as that green cartoon character used to sing years ago “Always let you conscience be your guide” i always did. regards, Rich.
    4 points
  42. Do it, but don't get sucked in to doing massive hours. Be aware you might be first on scene for something awful, you're going to spend entire shifts on bed watch. You'll Get hit, sworn at, injured and some regulars won't like you. You're going to be first on the list for scene guards too! I've been to drowings, stabbings, active DVs and bodies that have been in a chair for over a month in summer. I've had to stick my head inside a car that had rolled to check if anyone else was in it (there was) One of my SCs was with an air ambo doc as they cracked someone's ribs on the roadside. Another found a body in the boot of a burned out car. You will spend literally hours putting investigation files together, then you'll likely give them to a regular who will want it to be perfect (they have to be, or they'll complain about The Bloody Special did it wrong). You're also going to help people in ways you don't yet grasp. Those are the payoffs. The nice jobs, or the ones you do some genuine good make it worthwhile. I don't say this to put you off. I say these because I don't believe in painting a lovely picture. When I joined they painted it as fluffy with some great action in between. Coming from a police family I knew It wasn't the case, but watching it dawn people who expected lots of blues and action was interesting. These days we actually tell people what we do, and our retention rate is far better. We do take less on, but they stay.
    4 points
  43. Well if you searched the forum Christopher you'd have seen the reality of the situation. A rural constabulary saw a mass influx of people into the area amounting to extra thousands on top of what they usually expect, you were effectively talking about an extremely small number of response officers and a couple of PCSOs going up against hundreds of people who were determined to enjoy the sun and breach the lockdown legislation. What exactly did you expect them to do? A better question would be why can't hundreds of people take some personal responsibility for themselves and their families? Oh I know why because we eradicated the concept of personal responsibility as a society some years ago.
    4 points
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