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  2. Sounds like a good system. Volunteer leaders are just as important in, as you say, bringing on others in the areas they need to improve. That reminds me of a senior RUC/PSNI chap I met who said something to the effect of - the best weapon was the voice and if you had to reach for your weapon, you’d lost the argument. What’s PDP? Career progression type thing?
  3. Quartermaster

    Police signalling stick

    When I was a senior CCF cadet, I had a drill cane with a large silver looking top with the school crest. It was rather dented in some areas and knowing my school, it had probably been used to great effect on some new boy’s head!
  4. Beaker

    Police signalling stick

    Yeah. Also the operational cane I have is weighty. Likely better than a truncheon in a street confrontation. The ceremonial one is back with my Grandmother, but that's got a cane top on the shape of a rose that weights a couple of pounds...
  5. We can do the basics yeah, and we're constantly being reviewed and assessed. I'm currently working with one IP SC as what he needs more than anything else is to learn how to speak to people. He credits the amount if aggro he ends up in on 'being proactive'. He gets smacked because he gives people attitude. Another is struggling to complete her PDP, but I'm trying to engage her in to working with the right people to complete it. Meanwhile my actions with my SCs are being constantly reviewed to make sure I'm fulfilling my role requirements. Meanwhile I'm always keeping on top of my SCs to make sure they're following up where they need to, doing their cases and not carrying a caseload. People assume S/SGTs do nothing, but we do (or should be doing) a lot of training and welfare. These days about 30% of my time is admin, 30% operations and 40% being a cop. I kind if miss the roll up and just book kn, but I can bring some value to the role doing all the other stuff too.
  6. Quartermaster

    Police signalling stick

    I see, so a less sweet version of the whistle.
  7. Beaker

    Police signalling stick

    Yeah. The foot on the cane makes a loud noise when you bang it down. You can even tell what direction it is coming from.
  8. Today
  9. https://royalmarinesassociation.org.uk/news/operation-broadshare-overseas-support/
  10. Total lack of awareness by the officer is depicted in the video, there may of course be unknown factors, but it’s hard to justify the actions of kneeling a persons neck for a prolonged period of time when they are no longer resistant. The officer ignored the suspects plea’s and that of the public, I suspect his ego got in the way of his common sense and his colleagues should have had the integrity to step in when they saw it was going wrong. In the US Law Enforcement have a great following and appreciation that we don’t in the UK, but it only takes a small number of these incidents to totally change that. I suspect there will be running disorder for weeks now.
  11. Cop had his knee placed directly on the mans neck for over seven minutes... Complete procedure and training failure, the video was hard to watch but this is one of the rare cases where you can place the blame entirely on the officer at scene. The death was totally avoidable.
  12. Quartermaster

    Police signalling stick

    Great piece of their identity there. Shame when decent traditions are messed around with or left behind. I read somewhere that they were also used for some sort of signalling on night patrol?
  13. An insightful comment, thanks. I suppose a 'conversion course' could be the best way? Similar to the way the military has the 'tarts & vicars course', i.e. for professionally qualified officers who are doctors, priests etc. They need only a bit of basic military training, not the whole hog. Bit different, but the Specials have already done lots of the basics, so could as you have already said, been officially been assessed and ongoing unofficial assessing I imagine by their peers. At a time when they need all the right people, it seems very odd to treat them equally with a no-police experience candidate.
  14. I both partially agree, and partially disagree with this. I agree after all the training and investment they shouldn't be putting us in the same pool as the general intake if we're IP with experience working on our own. They can already find out what we're like, and some consideration should be given. Talk to the regulars Supervision at the station they're based to see if they're any good or not. They could also do the shortened training like they do for people with a policing degree and no actual experience. I don't however think the "I do it for free, so it should be automatic entry" helps anyone. A lot think they could just slide in to IR with no problems, usually the ones I'm sweeping up after and telling them to do stuff because they missed it. I was speaking to a reg inspector a while back who had worked in the training school previously. His estimate was that due to the way we treat our SCs we could be upskilled in 6 weeks, and rolled out on to IR with little fuss.
  15. Ether

    Police signalling stick

    Great bit of tradition, it’s a shame so much had been lost.
  16. BlueBob

    Special colleague left homeless

    Pretty essential really if they want to continue “staying” in a police station!!
  17. Murtaugh

    Police signalling stick

    Merseyside police are unique in that they still issue Sergeants with a signalling stick. It is a tradition that goes back to formation of the Liverpool Constabulary Force. The stick is a Wooden Victorian walking cane; it measures over 3 foot long with a metal ferrel on one end. This stick is a badge of office of the rank. Many of the old Sergeants, who had worked the docks would ask the dock board carpenters if they would make a stick from lignum-vitae. This is the same material that dock gates are made of. It is an extremely hard wood.
  18. Murtaugh

    Fireman’s key

    Drop keys don't trigger an alarm they just release the door lock. The idea is that it allows emergency services at scene to enter the building, the locking mechanism just flicks back into place after use.
  19. Murtaugh

    Fireman’s key

    It's bad how there is nothing in place. The amount of time critical jobs we go to. Looks like I will just have to rely on good neighbour's or force entry if powers permit to get in.
  20. Yesterday
  21. Insightful book on arming the British police: here Bit dated, but arguments still in use today, plus some examples of murders of unarmed police officers and the opposition to arming, as well as documenting the armed officers and the largely unfounded fears of dead bystanders or burglars.
  22. Yoshay

    Fireman’s key

    I take it these do not trigger any form of alarm or mechanism associated with the fire alarm etc ?
  23. bigboyblue

    Fireman’s key

    Some local authorities / housing providers wont put the drop key boxes on their developments, simply because anyone can get a key from ebay. fob correctly on the system is the only way I'm afraid for those doors. It a shame as in ambo land, we love to use drop keys, especially as those who are 'nan down' calls, as most live in blocks of flats.
  24. Quartermaster

    Special colleague left homeless

    Yes. Exemplifies service.
  25. Ether

    Special colleague left homeless

    Couldn’t agree more, horrendous position to be in and to keep on being a Special during this is commendable.
  26. Chief Cheetah

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

  27. Quartermaster

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Thx. Not seen, but will give it a go. She is rather good.
  28. Fedster

    Coronavirus: Multi Merged Thread

    Internal. Not sure if you watched Newsnight yesterday but her opening monologue was fantastic
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