Jump to content
Account Notice
  • To post a recruitment query in the "Recruitment Areas" or in the "Force Specific Areas" you will require a Recruitment Pass or a Membership Package. Click HERE to read more.
  • Your Account Is Currently Limited

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Past hour
  2. Thanks for this, Billy. It goes to explain some of the delay as well - in October 2018 a report from a pathologist was still awaited. As you say, lazy (or perhaps sensationalist) journalisms. The headline could have equally have said, ‘Cops face murder charge after use of police car’ as they used a car to get to the scene.
  3. Today
  4. I imagind the fact that Potts has 21 previous convictions for 39 offences may have something to do it. https://www.forces.net/news/man-jailed-16-weeks-after-setting-fireworks-remembrance-event
  5. I think the male's actions were incredibly ill-advised and deserves all the censure he gets, but somehow 16 weeks in prison seems excessive when compared to other crimes, arguably more serious, that don't attract that. I'm not saying he doesn't deserve the sentence, but then other crimes should then reflect their severity.
  6. Unbelievable. Even putting this 'prank' aside, whatever the 'prank' was, in this day and age any sergeant should have known better. He should be making sure such behaviour does not occur within those under him, let alone undertaking it himself.
  7. This appears to be yet another example of sensationalist, and sloppy, reporting by the main stream media. If they deigned to do a bit of research they would have found this from the horse's mouth: "The investigation gathered evidence which indicates that police contact with Mr Atkinson involved the use of a Taser, followed by a period of restraint and other uses of force." https://www.policeconduct.gov.uk/news/dalian-atkinson-file-evidence-referred-crown-prosecution-service There is always more to these things than meets the eye.
  8. Beaker

    anyone here?

    Cheers. I've sent a couple of emails, but not had any response.
  9. Chief Cheetah

    anyone here?

    Sorry you are having some problems. I shall flag this to our finance department for their attention.
  10. Beaker

    anyone here?

    Trying to pay my subs, and have been for months. Anyone got contact details for someone who can actually let me pay? Can't seem to do ot through the portal.
  11. Cuddles

    Lost Property

    Saying that police have a duty to accept property handed in and then saying that if they dump it and run the police are stuck with it were two distinct and separate scenarios. If you had made your point amicably and accepted that the way you worded your post didn't quite reflect what you meant, I wouldn't have called you out on it. Instead, you continued to argue. I make no apologies if you don't like what I've said. I have a duty to ensure that discussion on this board is not disrupted and unfortunately that means that your contribution to this thread has now been curtailed.
  12. Reasonable Man

    Lost Property

    ⛏♠️
  13. Zulu 22

    Lost Property

    Come on I have not claimed that you must accept property full stop, that is accepted. I posed the question what would you do if someone came in with found property and refused to retain it and walked out. Something must be done with it. It would depend on what your Force policy was as it could differ from Force to Force. I gave a link to the Cheshire web site which categorically stated what property you were obliged to accept. That property must be recorded, for record purposes, and for your own protection. Sly comments about you understanding that I retired when Captain Cook was a Sea Cadet, are grossly wrong and may I say out of order. I will post AGAIN, wjhat is a copy and paste from the Cheshire Constabulary Web site, which clearly lays down categories of property that you must accept Quote: " What should I do with property I have found? Property that should be reported / handed in to the Police for recording and retention: Firearms, Shotguns, Ammunition and Explosives Poisons, Toxins, Chemicals This category of items should not be retained by the finder / member of the public under any circumstances, and should be handed in to a Police station. If you believe that the item is too dangerous to handle, or poses a risk to yourself or members of the public, please report it to the police immediately. Computers, Laptops, Cameras, Smart Mobile ‘Phones or anything with an internal data memory Documents containing personal information e.g. passports, ID cards, birth/marriage certificates, driving licences etc. These items cannot be retained by the finder or members of the public under any circumstances, as they could contain personal or sensitive information. Please hand in to a police station or a Police Officer/Police Community Support Officer as soon as possible. Cash and Jewellery Please hand in to a police station or a Police Officer/Police Community Support Officer as soon as possible. If these are not claimed within 28 days they can usually be claimed by the finder. Property that should not be retained by the public, and should be reported to other organisations: Bank Cards / Cheque books If you find a bankcard please follow the instructions on the back of the card / cheque book or return to the issuing bank/building society. Prescribed Medication or Drugs If you find prescription medication/drugs please make reasonable enquiries which could include asking people nearby, or in nearby premises. If still unidentified then please take to the nearest hospital, GP surgery, pharmacy or police station so that they may be safely destroyed. Property that does not need to be reported: Bicycles We do not normally take receipt of bicycles, however if the finder believes that it may stolen or linked to a crime, for example it is new, then it can be reported to us. Unidentifiable Low Value Items There is no need to submit found property reports to the Police for unidentifiable low value items, including luggage, empty purses, empty wallets, umbrellas, spectacles, used or soiled clothing, perishable goods, rubbish, or similar. It is highly unlikely that the loser of any such unidentifiable low value item will approach the Police to find the lost item of property, and therefore we do not take receipt of these". End Quote. That does not alter the fact should a member of the public refuse to retain property. Now if you disagree with that then take it up with the Cheshire Constabulary. I cannot speak for the Instructions for all Forces. If you wish to search through them then you could always do so. Accept that different Forces will have different policies. Like it or not there would have to be a record of found property for the safe guard of the finder and, perhaps, more importantly for the protection of the officer against any allegation of impropriety. I presume that a officer would have to be clairvoyant to know that the property is not simply found property but could be stolen property the proceeds of crime.
  14. The head of an international pharmaceutical firm has been jailed for heading up what is believed to be the world’s biggest ever illegal anabolic steroid distribution network. A National Crime Agency investigation identified around 42 tonnes of importations of illicit anabolic steroids into the UK. Investigators were able to directly link Jacob Sporon-Fiedler, 38, the CEO of Indian-based company Alpha Pharma, to around 16 tonnes of those imports with an estimated value of around £12m. Sporon-Fiedler worked with a network of UK-based fixers, including Gurjaipal Dhillon, 65, and Nathan Selcon, 44. Dhillon and Selcon were responsible for arranging dozens of unlicenced shipments of drugs from India into Europe, and then distributing them. The NCA investigation began in 2014, following a seizure of around 600 kilos of the class C regulated drug by Border Force officers at Heathrow Airport. The load was destined for an address in Belfast. Following that, NCA investigators began to piece together the movement of dozens of unlicenced shipments of drugs, many of which were organised by Dhillon. The illegally imported drugs - made by Sporon-Fiedler’s pharmaceutical company in India – were shipped using Dhillon’s contacts. Once in the UK they would be distributed by Selcon to be sold to body builders and fitness fanatics on the black market. Selcon also had links to two other men, Alexander MacGregor and Mohammed Afzal, who had set up a purpose built illicit steroid laboratory to manufacture their own branded drugs. Inside the labs raw powder would be converted into a liquid solution that could be injected and sold in vials. Two such laboratories were identified. One operating on an industrial estate in Harmondsworth was raided and shut down by the NCA in March 2015. Sporon-Fiedler had visited the facility shortly after being released on bail following his arrest at Heathrow airport. Evidence indicated it had been running for around four years, and officers found packaging and labelling for around £43m-worth of anabolic steroids. NCA investigators were also able to prove links between the gang and another site in Slough which had produced steroids worth around £10m before it was raided by Thames Valley Police in Slough in 2009. Selcon, Afzal and MacGregor were found guilty of conspiring to manufacture steroids on 4 April 2019, following a two month trial at the Old Bailey. Dhillon was found guilty of conspiring to import steroids on 5 June 2019 following a separate trial. Sporon-Fiedler and Selcon had already admitted the charge. On 14 November 2019 Selcon and Sporon-Fiedler were sentenced to six years and five years and four months respectively. On the same day, Dhillon was sentenced to five years and Afzal to two years in prison. MacGregor will be sentenced at a later date. NCA branch commander David Cunningham said: “This organised crime group was the most prolific of its kind ever uncovered, likely the biggest global players in the illicit anabolic steroid market. “They had the ability to move tonnes of steroids into Europe where they would be sold on the black market, making tens of millions of pounds in profit. “At the heart of the network lay Jacob Sporon-Fiedler, the CEO of the pharmaceutical company manufacturing the product itself. Text messages found on his phone indicated he wanted to ship around four tonnes a month into Europe, which demonstrates the scale of this enterprise. “Sporon-Fiedler thought that by orchestrating this network from abroad he was untouchable, but following his arrest he found we had so much evidence against him he felt he had no choice but to plead guilty. “We have managed to directly link him to 16 tonnes of illegal steroids imported into the UK, however it is likely this group were responsible for far more. Intelligence supplied by the NCA has triggered multiple seizures and criminal investigations by law enforcement partners across Europe. “The important thing to remember is that all of these drugs were completely unregulated and unchecked, therefore they posed potentially major health risks to those who used them.” The NCA investigation drew on assistance from 30 different agencies in 26 different countries. In the UK that included Border Force, UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) and the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). The Danish police and German customs service also supported. Speaking following the sentencing UK Anti-Doping’s (UKAD) Director of Operations, Pat Myhill said: “We are very pleased with the outcome of this investigation. Our congratulations go to the team at the NCA for a successful resolution to this complicated case, which has identified significant distribution of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs). Not only are these drugs a threat to clean sport, but they pose a very real danger to health. “We were very happy to support the NCA in the investigation, especially in the early stages. The case demonstrates why excellent working relationships with law enforcement agencies are required to combat the varied threats to clean sport.” MHRA’s Head of Enforcement, Mark Jackson said: “Medicines purchased outside the regulated supply chain cannot be guaranteed to meet standards of quality, safety and effectiveness and can present a real risk to public health. Some may contain dangerous ingredients which can have devastating consequences for patients who use them. “The MHRA’s intelligence-led enforcement operations proudly assisted the NCA in this operation and will continue its work in collaborating with partners to help to stop medicines from illegally entering the UK.” 14 November 2019 View the full article
  15. Unbelievable that in the 21st Century such behaviour goes on in a disciplined service. Sadly there will be those who will defend this as ‘banter’ and consider the Sgt is being ‘thrown under a bus’, or some other metaphor.
  16. Cuddles

    Lost Property

    How did I know you were going to claim that!? The subsequent text does not change the context at all. You said that police were duty bound to accept property handed in at a police station. I left response two years ago and already my knowledge on response policing matters is woefully out of date. I understand that you retired when Captain Cook was a sea cadet, so how much do you think things have changed in the intervening years? You seem very keen on dishing out 'advice' to people, so I hope you don't mind if I dish out some of my own... you have been told time and time again by people who know better (and have backed it up with current policy) that we have no duty to accept property, and what the current guidance is. You continue to argue and twist things to suggest that you actually meant something else. Any more contrarianism from you and you're getting a thread ban.
  17. A police sergeant who allegedly dangled a pepperoni pizza over the food of a Jewish officer is facing a disciplinary hearing. https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/police-officer-to-face-disciplinary-hearing-over-pepperoni-pizza-prank-on-jewish-colleague-a4286611.html
  18. Masked burglars stole £300,000 of gold from a jewellery shop after smashing a hole through a wall from a neighbouring barbershop and then crawling through. https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/masked-raiders-smash-through-wall-in-300k-jewellery-heist-in-lewisham-a4286886.html
  19. Seventeen people were arrested today as police smashed a suspected global sex trafficking gang in east London. https://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/police-arrest-17-after-romanian-sex-trafficking-gang-busted-in-east-london-a4287066.html
  20. Richhamdo

    Handcuffs

    @Beaker, Up until my retirement we were only ever allowed one set of cuffs. When we changed from the chain cuffs with the big key to the next incarnation with the small key, [ not the quick cuff] i was given a cardboard box full of cuffs to dish out to our specials in town and get the old ones back of course. In this box, mixed in with the normal steel type were two sets of aluminium alloy chain cuffs, never seen them before or since, no idea where hey came from. of course i kept a set for myself. When the rigid cuff came out i asked someone in the corridors of power if i could keep my chain cuffs to use as a spare and the answer was an emphatic no, only carry that which is issued i think they said, or words to that effect. It was a shame because they weighed nothing at all, you could put them in your trouser pocket and not know they were there, they were a work of art. Anyway to cut a long story short they remained in my locker for a few years, as they were too good to be handed in and scrapped. I may have told you this before as to the end of them, but this is what happened. I was having a pint in the police bar one night when one of the CID guys came in and asked me if i had any spare cuffs as he needed them for a job he was going to. I think he knew i had a spare locker with various uniform i had saved for our specials, ties, hats,caps, jackets all that sort of thing. I gave him my good set and another set i had with the strict proviso that i wanted the alloy set back. Never saw them again,[ i wasn't surprised]ha. At least they were put to good use. Rich.
  21. Beaker

    Handcuffs

    I like the MOLLE vests, which I'm told will be standard issue once they run out of stock with the current covers. They make some sense, but I can't wait to see what some people load them up with. When I see a 19 year old in a TacVest saying they have a bad back I find it difficult to believe.
  22. cheese_puff

    Lost Property

    Again, you still haven’t got this right. You are not duty bound to accept ALL property. You are only required to accept property if it falls into a certain category. Hazardous, valuable, identifiable or containing data - then nothing much has changed. Everything else, (generally the bulk of lost property that’s handed in) then no action is taken. Your post suggests that this applies to all property, when this clearly isn’t the case. As we keep repeating, unidentifiable property should not be accepted. If the finder doesn’t want to retain it then they should be told to dispose of it. To take your example, if someone comes into the station with an item that has some value (but is unidentifiable and is not on the above list – let’s say a watch) and they leave it at the station and walk out, then there is little you can do since you can’t physically force them to take it, but instructions are that NO record should be made and it should not be retained by the station. There is no definitive list but examples are given of bicycles, watches, jewellery, clothing, cases, bags, wallets, purses, dogs (and other animals), keys etc etc. (Interestingly, Dorset Police include cash under £1000 on that list!) In terms of lost property, then it’s a lot simpler – Police do not take any reports of lost property – other than firearms really.
  23. Buck

    Handcuffs

    Oh yeh totally agree, I just get frustrated being tarred with the same brush as I'm one of the exceptions... It does only help with certain types of bad back as you've learnt so it is a poor excuse in general. They'd actually solve the problem by just making it an option like in most forces. The only reasons it's seen as Gucci here is it's not that easy to get hold of a tacvest, if it was just uniform there would be no issues...
  24. Beaker

    Handcuffs

    Problem is that I find it VERY difficult to believe most of them. Especiaily when they then throw so much kit on them (including the name and number badges). I found the one I borrowed made my back worse.
  25. Zulu 22

    Lost Property

    You are of course quoting out of context. At least you could quote the whole post, not just one early sentence. The part you chose to omit was: "If someone hands in lost property at a Police Station you are duty bound to accept it. If the owner is not traced or the property claimed the finder has a claim to it. If this does not happen then under the Police Property Act it can be disposed of at Auction. You would try and persuade the finder to retain the property but they are under no obligation to do so. They bring it to the office, report it, and walk out leaving it in your possession. You then have a duty to preserve and protect it".
  26. Buck

    Handcuffs

    Or one of the ones with an actual bad back who get's grouped with the others 😎
  27. Shmook

    Handcuffs

    Probably, but won't...!
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...