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Found 776 results

  1. Hello guys, About to start my PC training next month and just wondering what ideas people have for a patrol bag? Not too expensive, one to have that is durable but good value for money. I will be intending to use it during training to fit all my books, lunch etc generally day to day stuff, and then using it once training has finished and onto the real thing! Any suggestions, or previous experience with any would be great.
  2. A police helicopter base serving Cambridgeshire is closing - but residents will now see fixed wing aircraft chasing criminals for the first time. http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/criminals-chased-police-aeroplanes-cambridgeshire-12758419
  3. This dramatic video shows the moment a police officer smashes a car windscreen after a driver refuses to get out of his vehicle. Full Story - Mirror This video is doing the rounds on social media, many people including Lee Jasper using it as a propaganda video for their own agenda. Many people trying to imply the officers are behaviour is racist, not sure how that is? Buzzfeed are trying to find the driver to make an article about it.
  4. All footwear questions and advice welcome.
  5. I'm a little over half way through 25 weeks training and sat in my hotel room thinking about what's to come next. We've completed our Traffic legislation, which spanned over 2 weeks, and had a consolidation day full of role plays which was really good fun. We get closer to our Driving Course every week and I can't wait to be out in the cars and away from the classroom for 3 weeks, especially after meeting the driver trainers today on our Road Traffic Collision awareness day. I think I'm more excited about driving than anything else we've done on the course so far, and I'm sure I'm not the only one, doing things practically rather than listening to a power point about them feels so much more real. After today, traffic is definitely something I'm interested in just from the stories we were told and the under-representation of women in the role, and of course getting to drive the faster cars just that little bit faster.. I think a few people on the course are nervous for our driver training, and I'm really nervous to be a passenger to be honest, because that's just how I am, but I'm so excited to get behind the wheel myself. I'm going to be honest and say that the last couple of weeks I've struggled the most since we started training, not in terms of the lessons and legislation etc, but the routine of it. A long drive on a Monday morning to stay in a hotel where often the rooms aren't even big enough to get the ironing board out, and do the week of training with nothing to look forward to when the end of the day arrives because it just means heading back to the hotel. Then Friday comes around and I'm so excited for the moment I step back through the door of my home only to rush around the whole weekend juggling spending time with my family and my boyfriend along with the work we're set and spending the whole of Sunday washing and ironing all my shirts and tunic for our weekly parades as well as making sure I've packed all I need to live away from home for the week. It's all just getting to me a bit. And I think it's difficult for anyone back home to have a true understanding of what it is we've signed up for, training sounds like all fun and games and a breeze but recently I've been thinking well, I've worked so hard to be here, and worked so hard for a job that I know will mean having no clue what will happen from shift to shift, not knowing if one day I'll be walking down a street on patrol and someone decides to take their frustrations with the Police out on me. Not knowing if the first person to bite me in a scuffle is going to have Hepatitis, never knowing what's around the next corner or what someone has in their pocket, or whether an assault on me will be taken seriously or just considered 'part of the job', or who's watching you make a mistake and who will be there to pick up on it as soon as you do, what will be the first mistake you make that lands you in trouble and will you end up like the countless officers I see everyday hung out to dry by the media and criticised for the decisions they made in a situation most people will never have to face in their lives. I'm so excited to get out there and see the real world, and I'm so glad we have a tutor to stand beside us through the first few months, but man I'm nervous about what's waiting out there. I'm sure it's all just the fear now that we're getting closer, and I'm not saying I can't handle it at all, I think I've become a much stronger person just from these few short months of training, but it's definitely a fear of the unknown. Anyway, I think I've been having my 'mid-course' wobble and hopefully when our interviewing and driving course starts I'll feel a little bit more excited to come here every Monday. Thanks for reading, hope you're all well!
  6. Reality Check: Did the government protect police funding? 1 hour ago From the section UK Share The claim: Failing police forces have "no excuse" because their budgets have been protected. Reality Check verdict: Overall the police budget in England and Wales has been protected in real terms, but not every individual force will feel the benefit because the money is being targeted at specialist areas of policing. This relatively small funding boost comes off the back of five years of deep cuts. In 2015, the government announced that overall police budgets would be protected. This meant the amount of money the police receive from the government would increase each year in line with inflation for the following five years. The Minister for Policing, Brandon Lewis, flagged this in response to a report by the independent inspector of police forces, which found a "worrying" variation in the quality of policing across England and Wales, despite improvements overall. Police funding in Scotland is devolved and Northern Ireland has different funding arrangements so they were not included in the report. 'No excuse' The report was compiled by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC) and Mr Lewis said: "This Government has protected police funding, through the 2015 Spending Review. "There can be no excuse for any force that fails to deliver on its obligations - those identified as inadequate or requiring improvement must take HMIC's findings very seriously and I expect to see rapid improvements." The inspectorate had warned that some police forces were "struggling to respond to shrinking resources". It is true to say that the overall policing budget was protected in real terms in 2015 but this figure disguises some regional variation. Part of the £900m extra funding over the following five years is going on specific areas of policing like cybercrime and tackling child sexual exploitation which are often dealt with regionally, so not every individual force will see the benefit of this uplift. Austerity cuts A Home Office statement at the time of the announcement said that it would provide funding to maintain individual police force budgets at current cash levels. Not every police force will necessarily receive enough money to keep up with inflation. Spending on policing had been rising steadily for at least 15 years until austerity cuts began to kick in from 2010. It rose particularly rapidly in the 10 years to this date, going up by more than 30%. Following the 2008 crash and the swathe of cuts to public spending that followed, the part of police forces' budgets that are paid for by central government shrunk by 22% on average. Click to see content: Police_funding Before the 2015 announcement there was already regional variation. This is in large part because of the two main ways policing is funded: through a grant from central government and council tax. Different areas rely to different extents on the central government grant; for example last year Northumbria and the West Midlands police forces raised 12% of their revenue through council tax while Surrey raised almost half (49%) of its revenue in this way. This often corresponds to how well-off an area is - generally poorer areas have lower tax takes and rely more on government grants. As these grants have reduced, a larger proportion of budgets is coming from council tax. Since the grant was cut by the same percentage around the country, areas that lean most heavily on central government money, and are the least able to raise money through council tax, will have felt those cuts most sharply. Lean years You can see this in the real-term reductions to funding in different police forces. Between 2010 and 2016 Northumbria suffered a 23% cut while in Surrey it was only 12%. The areas that raised funding by the smallest amount during the previous good years have also experienced the biggest cuts in the lean years. However, it is also worth noting that the variation in quality raised in the HMIC report does not correspond directly to how much budgets have been cut. Bedfordshire, the only force to be rated inadequate, experienced a cut over the last five years that was about average for the country - a 17% fall compared with a fall of 18% across England and Wales. Durham, the only force to be rated outstanding, suffered an above average 20% cut. Demographic differences Of course, simply comparing budget cuts to performance does not take account of demographic differences and crime levels. So while it is true to say that policing is being protected at least to some extent, this comes off the back of five years of deep cuts - cuts which feel larger relative to large increases in spending in the preceding years. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-39144620
  7. On the old forum there was a topic on how you laid out your belt kit, and what you had where. Stepping it up a notch I thought I'd start one where you'd upload a picture of it instead. All kit belts welcome from UK police officers and PCSO to you guys abroad and in other jobs How do you feel about this? If not I'd be interested to know what you put where and of its personal issue kit/holders or from stores. Il post mine when I can figure out how (Tav vests welcome) Edit: I did it!:
  8. I am now officially going in to week 12 of training school after an annual leave week with only 14 weeks left - nearly half way! It's gone ridiculously fast that I can hardly believe we're in double figures already. It's been a fair few weeks since I last posted an update here, and after a bit of prompting I've decided now is probably a good time. We've been doing a lot of legislation over the past few weeks, and had two consolidation role plays days to practice what we'd learnt. These days consist of getting fully kitted up including high vis jackets and roaming around in pairs/threes until you are deployed over the radio to an 'incident', where an assessor and several students from the local college act out a scenario. The hardest part of these, for me, has definitely been the radio stuff. It's a whole other language to me and I've never experienced anything like it before, I still even get a bit stumped over Phonetic Alphabet, the other day I was spelling out 'JONES' and 'October, November' came out of my mouth, much to the amusement of the assessor. Like I said, we've had two of these consolidation days so far and I hated every second of the first one, despite the scenarios themselves not being too much of a disaster, the worry and pressure made me soo nervous. For example, we completely forgot to search a shoplifter who we transported to (fake) custody only for the assessor to pull a massive knife out of his hoodie, schoolboy error!! But to be fair to us, we had only just covered searching so I think we were worried about how much it had been drilled into us that searches can so easily be unlawful. But, the second time around, I enjoyed every single scenario we attended as I really felt that I had grasped how to achieve the best outcome, and I especially enjoyed the ones that involved talking to people rather than going straight in with legislation, but actually really enjoyed the satisfaction of getting them right. We also spent a week visiting the stations we'll be working at and those in the same area as us as well, so for me that was my station and the station that has the custody suite, which are a fair distance apart. Although not the most exciting week ever, it was really great to get to meet some of the people I might be working with and familiarise myself with the station. We spent a day in Court which was also quite interesting, and it was a lot different to when I visited several years ago on work experience with a journalist who I'll never forget being so angry at as he laughed someone crying as his case was heard in court. One officer took us for a tour around the area I'll be covering in a marked car, which to me was really, really cool, having never been in one before. The area that we cover is so huge though, and the stories of a small number of people being on shift at the same time and the amount of time it takes to get from one end of the area to another has made me a bit nervous!! I definitely payed a bit more extra attention in PST after knowing how far away backup could be and how often I'll be single-crewed. Since I last posted, we have started and pretty much finished our Personal Safety Training (PST/OST) which was so much fun from beginning to end. I woke up the morning after each session with plenty of bruises but really enjoyed having practical lessons and being shown how to defend myself. I think for a lot of us on my course it made it all seem quite real, as we joked around pretending to stab each other with plastic knifes, that in just a few months time we'll be out there and may well have to use these techniques from the very start. I've started engaging a lot more in Police news lately, and reading posts by UK Cop Humour on Facebook, and every post that is dedicated towards a fallen officer makes me feel so much different now that I am one of them. I've gained so much respect for the job through the stories from our trainers and understanding the daily struggles that officers face, even just leaving their family for a shift and not knowing what is going to happen in the hours that follow. I think it's really hit me just how dangerous this job can be, but that the work I will be doing will be so personally rewarding that it makes it all worth it (I hope!). Files, files and more files have been thrown at us left right and centre and on Friday we had the whole day to complete a GAP (Guilty Anticipated Plea) file which was hard enough, let alone learning what needs to be included in an NGAP file. To be honest, this has confused me quite a lot, and although I really enjoyed doing the file, it was really just because we had all the information in front of us, and I can't bear to think how hard it'd be to build one of these up completely from scratch! It has, however, made me really excited for our Interviewing course which is just around the corner. We recently went on a training night out to a nearby city which was so much fun, and really bonded us as a team even more than before. It was great to let our hair down for the night and, for me, get dressed up and look like a normal human being again rather than having my hair all scraped back and barely any makeup on. Following this we've had a week off for annual leave, which has been nice, but I'm itching to get back to it tomorrow as we start on Road Traffic stuff for the next two weeks before our Driving course which comes in March. I think the highlight for these past few weeks for me was our individual review that happened at the end of last week where I really began to feel like I was actually headed towards where I'm meant to end up. My trainer said that he loved the way I spoke to people during consolidations and thought that my humour would get me far, which was so encouraging for me as all this time I've been a bit worried that this job might turn me into a robot. The knowledge that I might actually be doing OK has given me so much more motivation and confidence for the remainder of the course and I think it came at just the right time for me. Other than that, my boots still aren't shiny and my tunic still has dodgy creases, but every day that I put on my uniform and walk up to HQ I feel more and more proud of how far I've come and more and more excited for what is to come next. Thanks for reading, sorry this was a long one!
  9. Chief says attacks on officers should attract appropriate sanction from the criminal justice system. A chief constable has said he is increasingly concerned about the “terrifying circumstances” officers are finding themselves in. Wiltshire Chief Constable Mike Veale said that those who put their own safety on the line to protect the public should not have to deal with unacceptable assaults or attacks. Latest figures by the Police Federation of England and Wales suggest there are potentially more than two million unarmed physical assaults on officers over a 12 month period and that an assault happens every four minutes. Data for Wiltshire revealed that 72 per cent of respondents to the Police Federation's Welfare survey had been a victim of unarmed physical violence at least once in the last year, while 36 per cent said someone had used a deadly weapon against at least once in the same time period. “Every day, brave and dedicated officers and staff face difficult, demanding and sometimes dangerous situations that the majority of the public thankfully may never have to witness or deal with,” said cc Veale. “While those in public services may run towards danger when others run away, that is no reason to believe that assaults are an accepted part of the job, or an occupational hazard of being a police officer or police staff member. “They are criminal assaults which should attract appropriate sanction from the criminal justice system which should be delivered swiftly and commensurately with not just the injuries sustained, but the incredible fear my colleagues can sometimes face.” CC Veale said that he personally speaks to any officers and staff who have been assaulted or inured on duty and that at the time of writing he had six emails in his inbox notifying him of officers and staff injured in recent days. He added during his time as chief, resources and capacity within occupational health facilities has increased and he delivers compensation directly to any officer who is awarded it by the courts following an assault, instead of them waiting months to receive it from the attacker. “I have also made a commitment to increase officers and staff protective equipment so they can protect themselves better. I now have 800 body worn cameras which will be deployed to my operational officers and staff so that we can more accurately capture evidence of criminality, which includes abuse and threats to my officers and staff,” he said. View on Police Oracle
  10. Lydia Lauro seduced colleague and used his login to look up confidential reports to trace witness in boyfriend’s murder trial https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/feb/10/police-worker-jailed-over-plot-to-leak-trial-witnesss-identity
  11. Looking at the number concerns raised around the quality/quantity of PST I start to wonder what is actually being delivered by different forces. Within the cathedral constabularies we receive two full days annually of PST, which generally covers unarmed techniques, rigid handcuffs and tactical baton training. Although these are repeated on every occasion they occasionally include cell/vehicle extraction (not that we have any), leg restraints etc. We do not have PAVA so don't cover this. We also have a written knowledge check test which must be passed along with competency assessment. We receive separate first aid training so this does not form part of PST. From some Home Office force colleagues I have spoken to it appears some officers only get one day annual refresher and in one force this includes first aid. Now the quality of instruction we receive is excellent, however, I think two days annually is insufficient, never mind one. I just wondered what the picture was nationally, and if officers are receiving only one day training annually isn't it any wonder injuries to officers are sky high. I know some posters are PST instructors so I would particularly welcome hearing from them.
  12. http://metro.co.uk/2017/02/05/policeman-dressed-as-giraffe-takes-down-shoplifter-fleeing-from-tk-maxx-6428702/
  13. Police have defended their actions after footage emerged of a man being Tasered in a Cheshire street. Full Story- Daily Mail
  14. A police inspector responsible for destroying seized drugs was found with £700,000 of cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and cannabis at his home, a court heard yesterday. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4133560/Police-inspector-11-kilos-cocaine-home.html#ixzz4WC52ShzM Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
  15. Police Hour Holding image This image is displayed when we don't have an image of the incident we are reporting. Around 6pm this evening (Tuesday January 2), during a pre-planned policing operation near to the M62 in Huddersfield a police firearm was discharged and a man has died. The slip roads east and west bound at junction 24 of the M62 remain closed. An immediate referral has been made to the Independent Police Complaints Commission who are in attendance in West Yorkshire and West Yorkshire Police are fully cooperating with their investigation. More Follows. Visit Police Hour to read more
  16. I know this will probably vary depending on what kind of team you're on/role etc. When I was on response I used to carry a kit bag that could fit my hat/coat etc., along with various bits of paperwork. Being cheap, I just used a £15 holdhall from JJB, which kind of worked. Unfortunately, as it was just a holdall, paperwork and things did get tatty and now the whole bag has pretty much fallen apart after 2 years of being thrown around, so I'm looking for a replacement. What do people use as a kit bag? I know people use things of niton999 and patrol store, but from looking at some colleague's they seem to be quite huge, and looking at those websites, a bit pricey. In my current role I only spend about half my time in a vehicle, so I'm looking for something cheap and that I can just quickly grab. I was looking at something along the lines of http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004LSBYV6 Anyone with any ideas?
  17. Approaching the remains with caution, officers called for an ambulance an put a cordon in place. http://metro.co.uk/2016/12/28/naked-dead-body-reported-to-police-turns-out-to-be-a-discarded-blow-up-doll-6347757/?ito=twitter Awkward.
  18. Afternoon all, I'm hoping to get some clarification on the D1 category. I understand that this is this required for the larger PSU vehicles like the typical IVECO ones: I understand that this can be taken as a course through your own force but how does it work. Does the force teach you and then you go to the DVLA for an test or is there an approved examiner working with the police. I only ask as with every other vehicle it's just a case of whether you can drive a car unless your a motorcyclist Thanks in advance. XA84
  19. Politicians got a ten per cent hike two years ago, while officers’ pay barely changed The Home Office has recommended that police officers receive a one per cent pay rise next year. The department’s submissions to the pay review body states both Federated ranks and senior officers in England and Wales should receive rises in line with the public sector wage cap. Any measures introduced to address local issues should also be balanced by moves to keep the overall budget rise at no more than one per cent, it argues. The National Police Chiefs' Council and Met Police have also called for a rise of one per cent. The submissions have been made the day after the MPs’ review body said politicians should get a 1.4 per cent rise – which is well above the cap they impose on public sector workers. The rise from £74,962 to £76,011, due to take effect in April 2017, follows another cap-busting increase of 1.3 per cent earlier this year. And it comes two years after a large ten per cent hike from £67,000 to £74,000 in 2015, recommended by the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority. Under a system designed to take the issue out of political control, MPs' salaries rise in line with the Office for National Statistics' calculation of average overall increases in the public sector. The increase is automatic and not subject to approval in Parliament. The figure is higher than the one per cent cap because it is calculated on the basis of all payments on public sector payslips, including items like bonuses and promotion-related rises. Ipsa confirmed that the ONS had issued a preliminary estimate of this year's figure of 1.4 per cent. However, this may change when the statistic is finalised nearer the date of the pay-rise. Ministerial salaries have been frozen until 2020. In its submission to the police pay body, the Home Office says there is no compelling evidence of any recruitment issues in policing – including for chief constables. PoliceOracle.com has previously highlighted that last year the majority of chief constable vacancies only received one application. This year two PCCs attempted to attract candidates from abroad to fill the roles. Outlining its rationale that pay should not go up by more than one per cent, the Home Office states: “Public debt stands at its highest share of GDP since the late 1960s, and the deficit remains among the highest in advanced economies. “It is vital that the government continues with its intention to reduce the budget deficit over an appropriate timeframe. “Public sector pay restraint continues to play a key role in fiscal consolidation. It helped save approximately £8bn in the last Parliament and is expected to save another £5bn in this Parliament.” UK inflation hit its highest level for more than two years in October. The Police Federation and Superintendents Association of England and Wales are asking for a 2.8pc rise for all officers. Andy Fittes, General Secretary of the Fed, said: "This year’s pay and morale survey, the largest ever undertaken, once again shows that morale continues to be low. Alongside how officers are treated, pay and benefits remains one of the most significant contributory factors to this. “Continuing austerity measures, exacerbated by inflation, have seen police officers hit hard by way of a real terms pay gap. The ability to recruit strong candidates, or recruit full stop, may be impacted if this is not addressed. “Whilst directed to limit any pay award at 1 per cent, the independent PRRB must be free to draw their own conclusions based on the evidence presented.” A final decision on police pay is expected next summer. View On Police Oracle Just thought I cheer everyone up with some good news..... what's that old saying we're all equal it's just some are more equal than others
  20. West Midlands Police closed part of Stratford Road after device was found at the West Midlands Police Museum http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/police-closed-down-commuter-road-12345946
  21. Disturbing footage has emerged of a policeman repeatedly punching a suspect in the back as 3 other officers hold him down. Full Story - Daily Mail
  22. All your questions regarding torches can be found and answered here.
  23. Major disturbances have been reported at Winston Green Prison. Full Story- Birmingham Mail
  24. Sorry if this has been posted before but i heard it on the radio today Thoughts? Agree? Disagree?