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Found 85 results

  1. A Muslim-born restaurateur has told how he fed hundreds of emergency service workers for free in the aftermath of Wednesday's terror attack. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/restaurant-owner-fed-police-emergency-workers-free-troia-ibrahim-dogus-a7650031.html Amazing. Fed 300-500 emergency services workers - offered them a place to warm up and get drinks & food for free.
  2. The website running a fundraising campaign to raise money for the family of murdered policeman Pc Keith Palmer is refusing to waive its five per cent fee, The Telegraph can disclose. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/24/justgiving-pockets-30000-fund-raise-money-family-pc-keith-palmer/ I'm in two minds about this - it is quite a lot of money (although they have donated £10,000 of their fee) However it presumably costs a lot of money to keep such a service up and running, especially at times of high demand, plus keep it secure too. On top of that, their website (and similar ones) have made giving to charity easier.
  3. The original target of £250,000 for the family of heroic PC Palmer was smashed inside 24 hours. A fundraising page for the family of fallen police hero PC Keith Palmer has raised more than £500,000 in less than a day. The JustGiving page was set up by the Metropolitan Police Federation on Thursday and quickly received thousands of donations. Originally the target had been to collect £250,000 for the family of PC Keith Palmer, who was killed on Wednesday in a knife attack near Parliament, but within hours that target was smashed. On Friday afternoon, just 24 hours after the page was set up, it had reached £572,838 and counting from almost 27,000 donors. Chairman of the Met fed Ken Marsh described the ten of thousands pouring in as ‘overwhelming’ and was grateful for the public support. He said: “We set it up quickly on Thursday and we are overwhelmed with the generosity of the public and police family but we are not surprised because we have seen how everyone has come together to support the police (since the attack). “I think that is because we police by consent in this country and the public are aware of the danger we face. “Every day, all over London and the rest of the UK, Police Officers risk their lives to protect and defend us. In the wake of this tragedy our thoughts are with Keith’s family and all the people who are injured have lost their lives. “I would not think for one minute that money is the answer for the family of PC Palmer and what they are going through but hopefully it can help in some small way.” View on Police Oracle
  4. Robot police were once sci-fi fantasy, but soon the real thing will be patrolling the streets of Dubai. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/03/20/real-life-robocops-will-soon-replace-human-police/
  5. Devon and Cornwall Police advertised for a "drone team manager". A police force is to launch a round-the-clock drone unit to help tackle crime. Devon and Cornwall Police advertised for a "drone team manager" to set up and manage an "operational and dynamic drone response" from nine policing centres across the two counties and Dorset. The force began trialling drones in November 2015 to test their operational effectiveness, using four DJI Inspire 1 devices with high-definition cameras to assist officers with police matters such as looking for missing people and taking crime scene photographs. Assistant Chief Constable Steve Barry, National Police Chiefs' Council lead for drones, said forces were "committed to embracing new technologies to deliver high-quality, cost- effective services and protection to the public". "Drones are one of a number of options that can deliver air support both now and in the future. "They have the potential to change the way we police by working with other technologies and updating traditional methods of foot and aerial patrols. "Trials and consultations are ongoing to develop more guidance for how the police service can use drones to help keep people safe." Mr Barry added: "Deploying drones is a decision for individual chief constables who ensure that they are used appropriately in the interest of public safety and efficient allocation of police resources." Around 21 police forces are experimenting with the technology. Chief Superintendent Jim Nye, strategic alliance commander for operations in Devon, Cornwall and Dorset, said the drones would be a "significant piece of kit", which would provide an "opportunity to improve technology available to police to better do what we do". Earlier this year, Labour MP Nick Smith said police should consider using drones to track down off-road bikers who are "vandalising" the mountains of Wales. During Home Office questions in the Commons, he said: "Because off-road bikers often go where the police cannot, can the Home Office look into providing resources, agreement and licencing on the use of drones to help us tackle this problem?" View on Police Oracle
  6. HMIC has raised red flag over the issue. Working as a detective needs to be restored as an attractive proposition again if chiefs want to address the national crisis in investigation skills, the chairman of the Police Federation National Detectives' Forum believes. Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary recently warned that there is a critical shortage of investigators in many forces. Martin Plummer, who is also chairman of Cumbria Police Federation, told PoliceOracle.com: “It’s frustrating when you get the HMIC stating the obvious that we have been saying for a considerable length of time. “[But] it’s a very simple equation, if you have 10 people on a team carrying a workload and you reduce that down to six and you increase that workload and something, somewhere is going to give. “We’re now seeing ridiculous workloads, detectives trying to spin so many plates while everything is combusting around them, there’s no financial backing for protracted inquiries. “We still investigate the most serious crimes, still deal with the worst criminals, the burden of proof in courts rightly remains as high as it ever was. But detectives are increasingly being told 'sorry you haven’t got the time to do that', 'sorry we haven’t got the budget', or 'something else has come up and there’s simply no one else to do it'.” He said the days of most officers wanting to become detectives were long gone, with what he calls “the hardest job in policing” becoming one which people know they will be under increasing pressure from management, as well as CPS, other partners and potentially the IPCC. In its report, HMIC identified the excessive workloads of those remaining in detective roles as a problem for policing. Chiefs have asked the independent remuneration body to allow them to give specialist bonuses to detectives in order to address the issue. The Met’s submission to the body states: “We know that monetary reward is not the only lever available but to have no reward options to attract officers into a particular career path remains deeply problematic, particularly as the operational structure becomes flatter with decreased opportunity for rank progression.” Mr Plummer says he would support extra payments, but points out that the issue is not primarily about personal finances. “The way you can solve this is simply that you need a career as a detective to become once again popular and attractive,” he said. “If you look back to the day where we had a mainstream CID that mainstream CID had their specialisms, they weren’t asking for extra payments for added responsibility they loved what they did. They had the time and resources to get the results. “Where we are now is that the good will has been eroded over the years. Detectives saying they’re not prepared to take on extra cases I’ve got the IPCC knocking on the door, victims, witnesses wanting to know how their cases are going, the CPS wanting things done yesterday. The support and backing is not there. “I’m not saying they want a pat on the back, what detectives have always wanted is to bring criminals to justice,” he added. Responding to the HMIC report, the NPCC pointed out that having 32,334 fewer officers and a 22 per cent budget cut had been difficult as crime “changes”. National lead for crime operations CC Mike Barton said: “Difficult decisions are being made between resourcing neighbourhood teams, response units, specialist investigations, and digital and cyber-enabled crime. “Police chiefs around the country will be looking at their local assessment to consider the impact of resourcing decisions, which may have been hidden from view.” View on Police Oracle
  7. A police helicopter base serving Cambridgeshire is closing - but residents will now see fixed wing aircraft chasing criminals for the first time. http://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/cambridge-news/criminals-chased-police-aeroplanes-cambridgeshire-12758419
  8. Transport workers union leader accuses railways force of 'turfing staff onto the streets'. British Transport Police PCSOs are considering strike action over changes to their shifts. The TSSA union is balloting the force’s community support officers ahead of the imposition of a 1am shift finish which it says “jeopardises [their] safety” in London. According to a statement from the union, the force is attempting to save money by changing shift patterns – but the workforce wll not be able to get home by public transport as a result. The force employs 330 PCSOs, with half of them London-based, but the union says: “because they can't afford London housing, London PCSOs themselves depend on trains in and out of home counties to the commute to work.”. PCSOs voiced their concerns that the new rosters are not practical during BTP's staff consultation process, but the TSSA says a proposal to finish the shift at midnight to enable members to make the last train home was rejected and PCSOs will now finish at 1am on one in three of their shifts. General Secretary Manuel Cortes said: "BTP have made a sham of their own consultation process by ignoring the valid concerns of their staff who simply can't get home at 1am. Are they supposed to sleep at the station? “No employer should turf their staff out at 1am onto the streets of London with no way to get home. But that's what BTP, the very people charged with ensuring the public travel safely, are now doing to their own staff. Frankly, it beggars belief and it's causing a lot of unnecessary upset." The new rotas will be introduced from April. The union is calling for shifts to be put back to midnight or to end at 7am instead, and will be balloting members over the issue. Mr Cortes added: "Our PCSO members are professional police support staff dedicated to keeping commuters safe. So a failure by their bosses to protect them is insulting as is their unwillingness to negotiate with our reps over this easily resolvable issue.” He added he will be calling on London Mayor Sadiq Khan to intervene to help the PCSOs. BTP Deputy Chief Constable Adrian Hanstock said: “It is disappointing to learn of this proposal by TSSA to ballot our PCSOs on plans for industrial action, which feels somewhat premature and excessive when we are still engaged in discussions with those few employees affected by our planned shift changes. “I must also contradict the suggestion that this is an exercise in cost-cutting by ruthlessly cutting shift allowances.” He added that the shift patterns were last reviewed in 2009 demand on the force has changed, and that staff had asked for a more reliable and consistent shift patterns. “In addition we have sought to ensure fewer officers and staff are working on their own across the national network, as well as build in sufficient capacity to minimise the impact of abstractions when officers are absent through training, court appearances, sickness and annual leave. “As the demand has changed, invariably it means the times of day we must be available to respond to incidents and manage large volumes of people travelling around the country must also change,” he said. There have been claims in the past that warranted police officers in London have resorted to breaking into property because of their shift patterns and inability to get to their homes outside the capital when they have gone off duty. View on Police Oracle
  9. Students at Cardiff University had their group chat interrupted by a police officer as he sent a selfie using Facebook Messenger http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/16/police-officer-goes-viral-sending-selfie-group-chat-helping/
  10. Addicts would be given the drug to inject under supervision. Drug addicts could be given heroin paid for by the police under plans put forward by one police and crime commissioner. Durham PCC Ron Hogg, who along with Chief Constable Mike Barton has spoken out in support of decriminalisation, said he has now asked the region’s public health departments to examine ways to introduce Heroin Assisted Treatment. Although plans for a “fix room” are being developed in Glasgow, this would be the first of its kind in England following similar schemes in a number of European countries. “The aim would be to enable people who have become addicted to heroin to follow a programme that would stabilise their addiction in a controlled environment, and reduce their dependency on heroin until they stop taking it,” said Mr Hogg. “The aim of the initiative is to save the lives of addicts, shut down drug dealers and reduce acquisitive crime. Instead of stealing in order to fund their habit, and money flowing the organised crime gangs, addicts will be helped to recover.” The scheme would focus on the most prolific at-risk offenders who would be provided with pharmaceutical heroin, with Mr Hogg adding that it would save money in the long run through reduced costs to courts, prisons, the police and wider society. The number of reported drug misuse deaths involving opioids including heroin rose by 58 per cent in England over the last four years, with the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs recommending last December that the government should consider the provision of medically supervised drug consumption clinics in locations with a high concentration of injecting drug use. View on Police Oracle
  11. Policing Minister says officers will have best and most appropriate technology. Police forces have been given approval to use a new taser model rather than the existing obsolete devices. Policing Minister Brandon Lewis announced today the Home Office has authorised use of the X2 model, which forces can replace their old X26 tasers. He said: “This government is committed to giving the police the tools they need to do their job effectively, and where modern specialist equipment like CEDs [conductive energy devices] are used, to ensure our officers have access to the best and most appropriate technology. “The decision to authorise the taser X2 follows stringent consideration of strategic, ethical, operational and societal issues, including an assessment of environmental factors.” While the X26's work sufficiently, they are no longer manufactured or sold. SACMILL, the scientific advisory body which assessed whether the less lethal weapons should be approved for use, have recommended that body worn video cameras should be worn by all officers using the devices. Matt Spencer, managing director of Taser UK, said: “We are confident that the X2 can help to make police officers more effective at dealing with the increased threat that they face on a daily basis. "More than 20 years of science and research has gone into Taser technology to make the X2 the most proven and most tested less-lethal technology available in the UK. “This announcement demonstrates the important contribution our technology is making to help the police keep the public safe. “With the X2’s improved internal accounting logs and ability to work hand-in-hand with body-worn video it can deliver extra layers of accountability that the public and the police rightly expect and deserve. "We’re proud of how we have adapted and improved our technology to meet the needs of the police and those who hold them to account on behalf of the public." The company has previously said that the X2 has a 25 per cent chance of working as intended first time than the X26. A new data collection system for use for any time “significant force” is used by police is also to be introduced from April. This will mean that forces should publish the ethnicity, age, location and outcome of the individual it is used on. Mr Lewis said: “The information should report on the situations when physical restraint is used, as well as the type of equipment, such as handcuffs, batons, sprays and conductive energy devices.” View on Police Oracle
  12. Sergeant Julia Martin-Jones had just watched her daughter tie the knot. An off-duty officer showed her dedication to her role when she detained a suspected burglar on her daughter’s wedding day. Gloucestershire Sergeant Julia Martin-Jones was returning home after watching her child – who is also an officer with the force – tie the knot when she spotted someone leaving a neighbour’s house acting suspiciously. Without hesitation she leapt into action to apprehend the figure and called colleagues to the scene. “It was around 1am on Sunday morning and I’d just returned home from the wedding with family and friends,” she said. “I saw a youth in dark clothing emerge from a neighbour's driveway and I didn't recognise him. I knew there had been burglaries in the area so went and stopped him. My colleagues later found my neighbour's garage had been broken into. “There I was in my sparkly dress, high heels and all my finery - I think he thought I was some kind of crazy woman!” A 15-year-old boy from Manchester arrested on suspicion of burglary in connection with the case has been bailed to return to police on March 25, pending further inquiries. View on Police Oracle
  13. An inquest found the woman, who was found hanged, died before the police were called. A pair of Met PCs have been found to have committed misconduct when they failed to immediately attend a suicide incident. PCs Tony Stephenson and Gavin Bateman were on duty together on April 15, 2015, when a call came in for a vulnerable woman who was classed as a danger to herself and others. The 22-year-old woman had sent suicidal texts to a friend and was not answering her door, the call was graded 'S' for 'significant risk' meaning officers are required to attend as soon as possible and in a maximum of 60 minutes. Instead of going straight to the call, PCs Bateman and Stephenson went to a nearby branch of McDonalds and bought cups of tea before heading to Leamouth Road Roundabout in east London. Whilst there they completed paperwork from an earlier incident and made a call to the informant to obtain more detail about the vulnerable young woman. At a misconduct hearing at the Empress State Building today a panel chaired by Akbar Khan found the officers had committed misconduct, rather than the more serious charge of gross misconduct, increasing their chances of remaining in the service. Mr Khan said: "The officers accepted that they breached standards of professional behaviour. "From the outset the panel wishes to state that it accepts that the late attendance must not be conflated with the sad death (of the vulnerable woman). "Both officers did not adequately or properly asses the information on the CAD in terms of the risk posed to her. "The delay in attending was not justified and was not in accordance with the guidance, you should have proceeded (to the incident) straight away. "It was accepted that the IPCC concluded that the call should have been graded as an 'I' call but the panel noted this has no bearing on its findings in this case. "It was submitted by both representatives that the basis of their clients understanding of the grading was the MDT user manual of guidance policy and their training in it. "Accordingly the panel finds that there was an absence of evidence to find that both officers were trained adequately. "Given the inconsistencies between the NCTS and the MDT guidance the panel finds there was a gap in their knowledge in that they should have understood they should have attended within a maximum of 60 minutes rather than up to 60 minutes. "The panel accepts that the delay was 22 minutes rather than 33 minutes. "The panel has also accepted evidence of good character on behalf of both officers and has taken into account their conscientiousness to their duties since the incident and that this was an isolated incident. "The panel finds on the balance of probabilities that the officers have breached the standards as alleged by the appropriate authority. "In all of the circumstances the panel finds the breaches of standards by both officers amount to misconduct only and not gross misconduct." The panel is due to make a decision on sanctions, if any, against both officers tomorrow. The hearing continues. View on Police Oracle
  14. Police Federation says it has worked to ensure the form is beneficial for officers and the service. A new form which must be used by all officers will help ensure they are not placed in a difficult position after a use of force incident, the Police Federation says. The Home Office says from April 1 2017, all officers must record any use of force in the same way, regardless of where they work. During the consultation process for the new form the Fed adds it has worked to ensure the burden on members is as minimal as possible. “We also wanted to make sure that once all this data is collected, it will be used as constructively as possible for officers across the country,” said Simon Kempton, the Federation’s lead for operational policing. “For the first time, we will have robust data from all forces demonstrating which techniques and equipment really work and which do not. “We will make sure that this information is used to change things like Officer Safety Training to reflect what we – the members – need to do our job properly. At the same time, if certain equipment isn’t up to the standard we need, we will now have an evidence base to show this.” Changes to the form made by the Federation included ‘were you injured during the incident?’ being amended to ‘do you believe you were injured during the incident?’ which it states protects officers if they subsequently learn they were injured but it wasn’t apparent at the time and they have a potential claim which could be undermined. It also insisted changing ‘was the subject suffering from a mental illness at the time of the incident?’ to ‘do you think the subject may have been suffering from some form of mental illness?’ as officers should not be expected to make such an assessment. The new form asks whether the officer is authorised to carry Taser, whether it was being carried at the time and whether the officer was single crewed, questions which the federation states will provide “invaluable evidence” when they argue that single crewing and a lack of Taser is dangerous for both the public and the officer. “When refuting accusations levelled at us of using excessive force, we will now be able to argue, with solid evidence, that in comparison to the huge numbers of incidents we attend, we rarely have to resort to using force,” said Mr Kempton. “Furthermore, the Federation will be able to use this data to demonstrate that if we are placed in a position when we must use force that we always try to use the lowest level of force available to us.” HMIC will be measuring whether the forms are being completed as part of their inspection schedule. View on Police Oracle
  15. Lydia Lauro seduced colleague and used his login to look up confidential reports to trace witness in boyfriend’s murder trial https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/feb/10/police-worker-jailed-over-plot-to-leak-trial-witnesss-identity
  16. Ilford turned into 'war zone' as police storm town centre and find injured man in car http://www.standard.co.uk/news/crime/ilford-turned-into-war-zone-as-police-storm-town-centre-and-find-injured-man-in-car-a3458801.html
  17. Commuter films moment an innocent woman breaks her LEG after an aggressive police dog pushes her onto train tracks http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4179646/Woman-breaks-LEG-police-dog-pushes-tracks.html Probably why we have the "stay behind the yellow lines" - best not to get too close to police dogs and don't go round them on the platform side!
  18. Officer's wife had told Court of Protection that her husband should be allowed to die. Doctors should stop providing life support treatment to a policeman who was left in a coma after a road accident, a judge has ruled. Merseyside PC Paul Briggs, who also served as a soldier in the Gulf War, suffered a severe brain injury in a motorcycle crash while on duty in July last year. At a hearing in the Court of Protection earlier this month, PC Briggs’ wife Lindsey had told Mr Justice Charles that he should be allowed to die – and wanted life-sustaining treatment to end. But doctors said the judge should be cautious and that there was “potential” for Mr Briggs to emerge from a minimally conscious state. Mr Justice Charles announced his decision on Tuesday and said Mr Briggs would go on to a palliative care regime at a hospice. Mrs Briggs said: “The court case was the hardest thing we have ever had to do but we did it for Paul, to honour his wishes. “We are grateful that Mr Justice Charles has shown compassion towards Paul, has respected his wishes and values and has understood what Paul would have wanted. “He has been able to place himself in Paul's situation, and for that we will be forever thankful.” View on Police Oracle
  19. Modernisation requires debate over what forces should prioritise in face of changing crime, says Sara Thornton https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/jan/13/police-need-to-drop-boss-knows-best-leadership-says-met-contender
  20. Nigerian jet 'kills at least 50' civilians in accidental attack 17 January 2017 From the section Africa A Nigerian air force jet has accidentally killed and injured many civilians in the north-east of the country, the military has said. International aid agency MSF says at least 50 people have been killed and more than 100 injured in the incident. Aid workers are among the casualties - the Red Cross says six of its workers are confirmed dead. The attack took place near Nigeria's border with Cameroon where the army has been fighting Boko Haram militants. Army spokesman Maj-Gen Lucky Irabor said the jet's pilot mistakenly believed he was attacking insurgents. Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari has sent a message expressing his dismay at the loss of life. View the full article
  21. Search for MH370 suspended 17 January 2017 From the section Asia Search for Malaysian plane MH370 that disappeared in 2014 with 239 on board is suspended This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. If you want to receive Breaking News alerts via email, or on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App then details on how to do so are available on this help page. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts. View the full article
  22. Japan has one of the lowest rates of gun crime in the world. In 2014 there were just six gun deaths, compared to 33,599 in the US. What is the secret? If you want to buy a gun in Japan you need patience and determination. You have to attend an all-day class, take a written exam and pass a shooting-range test with a mark of at least 95%. There are also mental health and drugs tests. Your criminal record is checked and police look for links to extremist groups. Then they check your relatives too - and even your work colleagues. And as well as having the power to deny gun licences, police also have sweeping powers to search and seize weapons. That's not all. Handguns are banned outright. Only shotguns and air rifles are allowed. The law restricts the number of gun shops. In most of Japan's 40 or so prefectures there can be no more than three, and you can only buy fresh cartridges by returning the spent cartridges you bought on your last visit. Police must be notified where the gun and the ammunition are stored - and they must be stored separately under lock and key. Police will also inspect guns once a year. And after three years your licence runs out, at which point you have to attend the course and pass the tests again. This helps explain why mass shootings in Japan are extremely rare. When mass killings occur, the killer most often wields a knife. The current gun control law was introduced in 1958, but the idea behind the policy dates back centuries. "Ever since guns entered the country, Japan has always had strict gun laws," says Iain Overton, executive director of Action on Armed Violence and the author of Gun Baby Gun. "They are the first nation to impose gun laws in the whole world and I think it laid down a bedrock saying that guns really don't play a part in civilian society." People were being rewarded for giving up firearms as far back as 1685, a policy Overton describes as "perhaps the first ever gun buyback initiative". The result is a very low level of gun ownership - 0.6 guns per 100 people in 2007, according to the Small Arms Survey, compared to 6.2 in England and Wales and 88.8 in the US. "The moment you have guns in society, you will have gun violence but I think it's about the quantity," says Overton. "If you have very few guns in society, you will almost inevitably have low levels of violence." Japanese police officers rarely use guns and put much greater emphasis on martial arts - all are expected to become a black belt in judo. They spend more time practising kendo (fighting with bamboo swords) than learning how to use firearms. "The response to violence is never violence, it's always to de-escalate it. Only six shots were fired by Japanese police nationwide [in 2015]," says journalist Anthony Berteaux. "What most Japanese police will do is get huge futons and essentially roll up a person who is being violent or drunk into a little burrito and carry them back to the station to calm them down." Overton contrasts this with the American model, which he says has been "to militarise the police". "If you have too many police pulling out guns at the first instance of crime, you lead to a miniature arms race between police and criminals," he says. To underline the taboo attached to inappropriate use of weapons, an officer who used his gun to kill himself was charged posthumously with a criminal offence. He carried out the act while on duty - policemen never carry weapons off-duty, leaving them at the station when they finish their shift. The care police take with firearms is mirrored in the self-defence forces. Journalist Jake Adelstein once attended a shooting practice, which ended with the gathering up of the bullet casings - and there was great concern when one turned out to be missing. "One bullet shell was unaccounted for - one shell had fallen behind one of the targets - and nobody was allowed to leave the facilities until they found the shell," he says. There is no clamour in Japan for gun regulations to be relaxed, says Berteaux. "A lot of it stems from this post-war sentiment of pacifism that the war was horrible and we can never have that again," he explains. "People assume that peace is always going to exist and when you have a culture like that you don't really feel the need to arm yourself or have an object that disrupts that peace." In fact, moves to expand the role of Japan's self-defence forces in foreign peacekeeping operations have caused concern in some quarters. "It is unknown territory," says political science professor Koichi Nakano. "Maybe the government will try to normalise occasional death in the self-defence force and perhaps even try to glorify the exercise of weapons?" According to Iain Overton, the "almost taboo level of rejection" of guns in Japan means that the country is "edging towards a perfect place" - though he points out that Iceland also achieves a very low rate of gun crime, despite a much higher level of gun ownership. Henrietta Moore of the Institute for Global Prosperity at University College London applauds the Japanese for not viewing gun ownership as "a civil liberty", and rejecting the idea of firearms as "something you use to defend your property against others". But for Japanese gangsters the tight gun control laws are a problem. Yakuza gun crime has sharply declined in the last 15 years, but those who continue to carry firearms have to find ingenious ways of smuggling them into the country. "The criminals pack the guns inside of a tuna so it looks like a frozen tuna," says retired police officer Tahei Ogawa. "But we have discovered cases where they have actually hidden a gun inside." http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-38365729 Probably too late for the police in the UK and US to take this approach, but certainly an interesting article.
  23. Jerusalem 'lorry attack' injures 15 8 January 2017 From the section Middle East Police in Jerusalem have shot a suspected terrorist who rammed a lorry into a group of pedestrians, injuring at least 15, reports say. The attack occurred on a popular promenade overlooking the walled Old City of Jerusalem. "It is a terrorist attack, a ramming attack," a police spokeswoman said on Israel Radio, which reported that bodies were "strewn on the street". The attack comes weeks after 12 people died in a lorry attack in Berlin. View the full article
  24. Israel PM backs pardon for soldier 4 January 2017 From the section Middle East Israeli PM Netanyahu calls for pardon of soldier convicted of manslaughter for the killing of wounded Palestinian This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. If you want to receive Breaking News alerts via email, or on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App then details on how to do so are available on this help page. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts. View the full article
  25. Five arrests after fatal hit-and-run 1 January 2017 From the section UK Five men arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving after girl aged 12 killed in Oldham hit-and-run This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. If you want to receive Breaking News alerts via email, or on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App then details on how to do so are available on this help page. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts. View the full article